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Full text of "Town of Cohasset (Mass.) Annual Report"

TOWN OF COHASSET 




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ANNUAL REPORT 
1969 



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cntoriant 



JUANITA (JONES) OLIVER 

Died March 1, 1969 



PHILIP L. TOWLE 

Died March 26, 1969 



ROBERT V. ANDREWS 

Died July 9, 1969 



ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

Board of Selectmen 

Of the Financial Affairs 

OF THE 

TOWN OF COHASSET 

Reports of The School Committee 

AND THE 

Reports of Other Town Officers 




FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31 



1969 



Denison Press, Inc., E. Weymouth 



TOWN OFFICERS 
1969 - 1970 

Elected By Ballot 

Moderator 

David E. Place Term expires March 1972 

Selectmen 

Helen E. Scripture Term expires March 1970 

George W. McLaughlin Term expires March 1971 

Arthur L. Clark Term expires March 1972 

Assessors 

Helen E. Scripture Term expires March 1970 

Louis A. Laugelli Term expires March 1971 

Warren S. Pratt Term expires March 1972 

Treasurer 

David E. Truesdell Term expires March 1970 

Town Collector 

Gordon E. Flint Term expires March 1970 

Tree Warden 

Howard Bates Term expires March 1971 

Resigned May 31, 1969 

Louis C. Bailey, Jr Term expires March 1970 

Appointed May 31, 1969 

Highway Surveyor 

Louis C. Bailey, Jr Term expires March 1972 

School Committee 

Lot E. Bates Term expires March 1970 

Paul M. Donovan Term expires March 1970 

T. Gerard Keating Term expires March 1971 

John P. Reardon Term expires March 1971 

Ellen P. Smith Term expires March 1972 

Sumner Smith, Jr Term expires March 1972 



Trustees Of Cohasset Free Public Library 

Barry T. Hilderbrandt Term expires March 1970 

John Bishop Term expires March 1970 

Richard B. Singer Term expires March 1970 

Emily B. Gleason Term expires March 1971 

Phyllis P. Godwin Term expires March 1971 

Lloyd C. Trott Term exphes March 1971 

Sheila S. Evans Term expires March 1972 

Donald R. Hammonds Term expires March 1972 

Bettina H. Pratt Term expires March 1972 

Board Of Health 

Rene G. Chiasson Term expires March 1970 

Edward A. McCarthy Term expires March 1971 

William J. Montuori Term expires March 1972 

Planning Board 

Norman W. Brown Term expires March 1970 

John H. Barrett Term expires March 1971 

Nathan W. Bates . . Term expires March 1972 

Gilbert S. Tower Term expires March 1973 

Lawrence D. Ainslie Term expires March 1974 

Water Commissioners 

Rocco F. Laugelle Term expires March 1970 

Alan S. Murphy, Jr Term expires March 1971 

Henry W. Ainslie, Jr Term expires March 1972 

Recreation Commission 

Norman Delany Term expires March 1970 

Dennis W. Kuntz Term expires March 1971 

Hamilton T. Tewksbury Term expires March 1972 

Harold F. Barnes Term expires March 1973 

Resigned September 1, 1969 

William G. O'Brien Term expires March 1974 

South Shore Regional School Committee 

John A. Geary Term expires March 1972 

TOWN OFFICERS APPOINTED BY SELECTMEN 
TOWN ACCOUNTANT UNDER CIVIL SERVICE 

William S. Signorelli 

REGISTRARS OF VOTERS 

Dorothy Wadsworth Term expires March 1970 

Qarence M. Grassie Term expires March 1971 

Louise E. Conroy Term expires March 1972 



ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

Appointed By Chairman Of Selectmen, Chainnen Of Advisory Committee 

And Moderator 

William W. Nason Term expires March 1970 

Joseph Perroncello Term expires March 1970 

Jerome R. Tosi Term expires March 1970 

Robert S. Pape Term expires March 1971 

Oliver W. Park Term expires March 1971 

Danforth B. Lincoln Term expires March 1971 

Arnold N. Weeks Term expires March 1972 

John Patrolia Term expires March 1972 

L. Emmett Holt, III Term expires March 1972 

CHIEF OF POLICE UNDER CIVIL SERVICE 

Randolph A. Feola 

POLICE LIEUTENANT UNDER CIVIL SERVICE 

Thomas B. Kane 

SERGEANTS OF POLICE UNDER CIVIL SERVICE 

Richard P. Barrow 
Charles E. Stockbridge 

PATROLMEN UNDER CIVIL SERVICE 

Louis J. Simeone 
Frederick L. Huntwork 
Carmelo Conte 
Brian Cogill 
Joseph M. Kealey 
Clifton B. Jones 
Robert A. Goyette 
John J. Rhodes, 3rd 
David J. Moir 
Bartholomew P. Winn 
Randolph A. Feola, Jr. 

SPECIAL POLICE OFFICERS ASSIGNED TO THE POLICE 

DEPARTMENT 

Peter G. Laugelle 
Edward J. Figueiredo 
Benjamin F. Curley, Jr. 
Arthur J. Dixon, Jr. 
Rocco F. Laugelle 
Joseph S. Laugelle 
Paul L. Migliaccio 
John E. Kenney 

SPECIAL POLICE OFFICERS 

Harry H. Ritter, Harbor Master and Shellf.sh Constable 
Clifford J. Dickson, Assistant Harbor Master 



William G. Stone, Assistant Harbor Master 

Louis C. Bailey, Jr., Highway Surveyor 

Charles Piepenbrink, Fire Chief 

Edward P. Malley, Superintendent of Wires 

Edwin H. Pratt, Superintendent of Water Department 

T. Gerard Keating, Director of Civil Defense 

Robert V. Andrews, Deputy Director of Civil Defense, Died July 9, 1969 

J. Nelson Patrolia, Gas Inspector 

Benjamin F. Curley, Jr., Sealer of Weights & Measures 

James M. Hurley, Custodian, Town Hall 

Clifford J. Dickson, Cohasset Yacht Club 

Theodore O. Macklin, Cohasset Sailing Club 

Richard Lincoln, Cohasset Golf Club 

Arthur Washburn, Cohasset Golf Club 

Austin L. Ahearn, Jr., Private 

Charles E. Butman, Private 

Ralph S. Enos, Private 

Norman G. Grassie, Private 

George E, Haley, Private 

David C. Place, Private 

Robert B. James, Private 

Frank E. Jason, Private 

George S. Jason, Private 

Manuel A. Marks, Private 

D. Bruce McLean, Private 

Stephen H. Rooney, Private 

John W. Trayers, Private 

Richardson White, Private 

Joseph A. Silvia, Private 

Harold W. Litchfield, Private 

Eric G. Pearson, Wheelwright Park 

LOCKUP KEEPERS 

Randolph A. Feola Thomas B. Kane 



DOG OFFICERS 



Randolph A. Feola 
Thomas B. Kane 
Richard P. Barrow 
Charles Stockbridge 
Louis J. Simeone 
Carmelo Conte 
Frederick L. Huntwork 
Robert A. Goyette 
Brian Cogill 
Joseph M. Kealey 
David J. Moir 
Clifton B. Jones 
John J. Rhodes, 3rd 
Bartholomew P. Winn 



FOREST WARDEN 

Charles Piepenbrink 

LOCAL SUPERINTENDENT OF INSECT PEST CONTROL 

Howard Bates, resigned May 31, 1969 

DIRECTOR OF CIVIL DEFENSE 

T. Gerard Keating 

DEPUTY DIRECTOR OF CIVIL DEFENSE 

Robert V. Andrews, Died July 9, 1969 

AGENT FOR GROUP AND HEALTH INSURANCE FOR TOWN 

EMPLOYEES 

Paul Blackmur 

TOWN COUNSEL 

J. Blake Thaxter, Jr. 

SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 

Benjamin F. Curley, Jr. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF WIRES 

Edward P. Malley 

MEASURES OF WOOD AND BARK 

Louis C. Bailey John W. Trayers 

Howard Bates Richardson White 

VETERANS' BURIAL AGENT 

Gordon E. Flint 

CONSTABLE 

Robert N. Rooney 

INSPECTOR OF PUBLIC BUILDINGS 

Charles Piepenbrink 

CARETAKERS 

Edward L. Smith, Superintendent, Woodside Cemetery and Caretaker 

Veterans' Lots, Woodside Cemetery 
Frank Infusino, Town Commons and Small Parks 
Clifford Studley, Wadleigh Park and Green Gate Cemetery 
Ralph Enos, Norman Todd Park 

DIRECTOR OF VETERANS' AFFAIRS 

Gordon E. Flint 
FENCE VIEWERS 

Anthony Emanuello John Winters Burtram J. Pratt 



HARBOR MASTER 

Harry H. Ritter 

ASSISTANT HARBOR MASTER 

Clifford J. Dickson William G. Stone 

SHELLFISH CONSTABLE 

Harry H. Ritter 

PUBLIC WEIGHERS AND WEIGHERS OF COAL 

Walter C. Wheelwright Dorothy C. Wood 

GAS INSPECTOR 

J. Nelson Patrolia 

CUSTODIAN OF TOWN HALL 

James M. Hurley 

TOWN ENGINEER 

T. Clark Perkins 

COMMISSIONER OF SOUTH SHORE MOSQUITO PROJECT 

Howard Bates — Resigned May 31, 1969 

BOARD OF APPEALS 

Roger B. Coulter, Chairman Arthur L. Lehr, Jr. 

Elmer H. Pratt 

ASSOCIATE MEMBERS 

Robert Cleaves, Jr. Robert S. Booth, Jr. 

ORGANIZATION OF BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

Arthur L. Clark, Chairman Helen E. Scripture 

George W. McLaughlin Estelle H. Fandel, Secretary 

ORGANIZATION OF BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

Louis A. Laugelli, Chairman Dorothy V. Graham, Clerk 

Warren S. Pratt Mary F. Kavaney, Assistant Clerk 

Helen E. Scripture 

SCHOOL FACILITIES COMMITTEE 

Under Article 42, March Meeting, 1960 

Appointed By The Moderator 

Lot E. Bates David C. Whipple Alexander Boyt, Jr. : 

Appointed By The Board Of Selectmen 

Albert P. Buckley Barbara M. Power Sheila S. Evans 

Appointed By The School Committee 

Austin L. Ahearn, Jr., Chairman Sumner Smith, Jr. 
John P. Reardon 

10 



PERSONNEL COMMITTEE 

Appointed By The Chairman Of The Board Of Selectmen 

The Town Moderator And Chairman Of The Advisory Committee 

Under Article 5, March Meeting 1957 

Edwin C. Lincoln, Jr Term expires 1970 

Eli Manchester, Jr Term expires 1970 

G. Hey ward Howkins, Chairman Term expires 1971 

Ira B. P. Stoughton, Jr Term expires 1972 

William F. McDermott Term expires 1972 

COMMITTEE TO STUDY, INVESTIGATE AND CONSIDER THE 

SUBJECT OF DREDGING, IMPROVEMENT AND 

ENLARGEMENT OF COHASSET HARBOR 

Under Article 27, March Meeting, 1957 

Harry H. Ritter, Harbor Master 
Arthur L. Clark, Chairman, Board of Selectmen 
Donald J. Evans, Commodore of Yacht Club 
John H. Barrett, Chairman, Planning Board 

AT THE REQUEST OF THE MASSACHUSETTS 

TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION TO REPRESENT THE TOWN 

OF COHASSET IN THE GREATER BOSTON REGION 

Appointed By The Board Of Selectmen 

Arthur L. Clark, Chairman, Board of Selectmen 
John H. Barrett, Chairman, Planning Board 
Louis F. Eaton, Jr. 

PUBLIC SEWERAGE SYSTEM STUDY COMMITTEE 

Under Article 30, March Meeting, 1960 

Rene Chiasson, Chairman 

Edward A. McCarthy, M.D., Chairman, Board of Health 

Helen E. Scripture, Board of Selectmen 

William J. Montuori, Board of Health 

Nathan Bates, Planning Board 

Bronson H. Waterman 

John A. Calabro 

William Morton 

Rocco F. Laugelle, Board of Sewer Commissioners 

CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

Under Article 34, March Meeting, 1961 

Edward F. Woods Term expires 1970 

John K. Bryant Term expires 1970 

Herbert B. Marsh Term expires 1970 

George W. Benedict Term expires 1971 

John H. Barrett Term expires 1971 

Mary Jane E. McArthur . Term expires 1972 

John F. Hubbard, Chairman Term expires 1972 

11 



HONORARY ASSOCIATE MEMBER 

Charles L. Smith, Jr. 

COMMITTEE OF FIVE MEMBERS ON TOWN LAND AND 
WATER SUPPLY REQUIREMENTS 

Under Article 35, March Meeting, 1967 

Herbert B. Marsh John E. Keiiney 

Yolanda I. Baccari Alan S. Murphy, Jr. 

John E. Souther 

COMMITTEE OF FIVE CITIZENS TO SURVEY THE 

ADMINISTRATIVE FUNCTIONING OF THE VARIOUS TOWN 

OFFICES, BOARDS, AND DEPARTMENTS 

Appointed By The Moderator, The Chairman Of The Board Of 
Selectmen And Chairman Of The Advisory Committee 

Under Article 46, March Meeting, 1967 

Louis N. Simeone, Chairman Margaret R. Charles 

Edwin A. Young Philip N. Bowditch 

BICENTENNIAL COMMITTEE 

Appointed by the Moderator 
Under Resolution, March 1967 Annual Town Meeting 
Burtram J. Pratt, Chairman 
Carlo Lagrotteria, Jr., Vice Chairman (Resigned) 
Mary Jane E. McArthur, Secretary 
Prescott T. Cumner, Treasurer 
A. J. Antoine Jr., Director 
Sheldon N. Ripley, Director 
Arthur Taft Mahoney, Director 
Paul Blackmur, Vice Chairman 
Austin L. Aheam Jr. Robert P. Coyne 

D. Bruce McLean Mary E. Fleming 

Jeanne T. Gormley (Resigned) Osbom F. Ingram 

George Warren Bates Francis W. Hagerty 

George F. Hinchliffe Mercie V. Nichols 

Dorothy N. Wadsworth Donald F. Qark 

Edward A. Mulvey Earl R. McArthur Jr. 

Harry H. Ritter Eleanor S. Marsh 

Eleanor T. Downs William S. Signorelli 

Gilbert S. Tower Frank S. Wheelwright 

Philip L. Towle (Deceased) Eric G. Pearson 

Nathan W. Bates Herbert L. Jason 

James E. Sullivan Mary M. Shuebruk 

Appointed by the Committee 
Arthur W. Hunt Louis N.. Simeone 

Harold E. Coughlin Peter G. Laugelle 

Robert N. Fraser Charles G. Fink 

Kenneth L. Jason Jean Fink 

12 



Donald J. Evans Gifford R. Dean 

Frederic H. Wood, Jr. Frank J. Pattison 

Senator William D. Weeks Jane Porter 

Everett I. Montague Robert B. James 



BUILDING CODE COMMITTEE 
Appointed By The Board Of Selectmen 

Charles T. Patrolia, Chairman Irwin D. Matthew 

William R. Hooper Earle W. Higgins, Jr. 

Joseph E. Wood 



COUNCIL FOR THE AGING 

Appointed By Board Of Selectmen 

Arlene S. Qine, Chairman 
Cornelia H. White 
Albert Livingston 
Thomas Twitchell 
Fred Dellorfano 
Catherine B. Sanders 
Rev. F. Lee Richards 
Frank Giuliano 
Kathleen Smith Conte 
Frances Antoine 

MEMBERS OF THE HOUSING AUTHORITY 

Under Article 36, 1969 Town Meeting 
Appointed By The Board Of Selectmen 

W. Chester Browne, Chairman 
Samuel Hassan 
Margaret Lynch 
James R. DeGiacomo 

HOUSING AUTHORITY 

Mary Jeanette Murray, appointed by the Governor for three years 

COMMITTEE TO MAKE A STUDY OF TOWN OWNED BUILDINGS 

Under Article 42, March Meeting 1969 
Appointed By The Board Of Selectmen 

Philip G. Facey, Jr., Chairman 
Brian R. Wilken 
Lawrence S. Gates 
James A. Litchfield 
Orin E. Huston 



13 



ZONING BY-LAW COMMITTEE 
Appointed By The Board Of Selectmen 
Under Resolution, March Meeting 1969 

Robert B. James, Chairman 
Roger B. Coulter 
James R. DeGiacomo 

WAR MEMORIAL COMMITTEE 

Appointed By The Moderator 

Under Resolution Special Town Meeting, December 1969 

Glen A. Pratt, Chairman C Arthur McCarthy 

Brian Cogill, III John L. Mello 

Leo J. Fiori Norbert Reardon, III 

Clarence M. Grassie Rev. F. Lee Richards 

G. Lawrence Keating Gerard Stanton, Jr. 

Robert B. Laney James E. Tyeryar 

Rocco F. Laugelle Brian R. Wilkin 
James A. Litchfield 

COMMITTEE TO STUDY THE 
GOVERNMENT ISLAND PROPERTY 

Appointed By The Board Of Selectmen 

Gerard Stanton Mary Jane E. McArthur 

Edward Figuerido A. Fred Petersen 

Richard C. Tousley Prescott T. Cumner 

Clifford J. Dickson 



JURY LIST FOR 1969 

NAME ADDRESS OCCUPATION 

Alexander, Arthur D., 24 Rust Way Executive 

Anderson, Francis X., 44 Ash Street Sign Painter 

Ayer, Alexander P., 20 Bayberry Lane Salesman 

Berry, Jack R., 30 Windy Hill Rd Vice President 

Bobo, Stephen N., 1 1 Sheldon Rd Manager 

Brown, Norman W., 7 Windsor Rd Director of Development 

Canterbury, George W. Jr., 2 Sheldon Rd Manufacturing 

Carlson, Paul A., 64 Summer St., Manager 

Cherry, Jay L., 50 Summer St Advertising Manager 

Coblentz, Abraham S., 46 Brewster Rd Manager 

Cowdry, Robert S., 812 C. J. Cushing Way Maintenance Engineer 

Devlin, James P., 16 Rustic Drive Contract Manager 

Dillon, Edward J., 217 Jerusalem Road Personnel Manager 

Dockendorff, Hazel, Ledgewood Drive Housewife 

Duncan, Bruce A., 24 Hammond Ave Claims Manager 

Facey, Patricia G., 4 Woodland Drive Housewife 

Oilman, Walter G., 20 Brewster Rd Chauffeur 

Djesteby, Ame, 81 Old Pasture Rd Importer 

14 



Golden, Doris C, 2 Boundbrook Lane Housewife 

Goodwin, Gordon L., 15 Buttonwood Lane Mechanic 

Gimviile, Francis D., 55 Pleasant St Retired 

Hassan, Peggy W., 15 Arrowwood St Housewife 

Hood, Paul E. Jr., 23 Border St Program Development Consultant 

Howe, John F., 20 Hobart Lane Manager 

Huck, David D., 79 North Main St Agency Manager 

Jaeckel, John E., 20 Fairoaks Lane General Manager 

James, Robert B., 12 Ripley Rd Retired 

Joyce, William B., 22 Virginia Lane Telephone Installer 

Kautz, George W., 23 Schofield Rd Manager 

Leonard, John J., 53 Elm Street Superintendent 

Lincoln, Edward C. Jr., 17 Sohier St Shoe Manufacturer 

MacLure, Laurens, 183 Sohier St Vice President 

Mahoney, Mary Ann, 28 Otis Ave Housewife 

Maichle, Henry R., 16 Wood Way Engineer 

Matthew, Irwin D., 33 Stanton Rd Architect 

Meyer, John H., 181 Border St Executive 

Miller, Albert D., 11 Bailey Rd Optician 

Orr, George W., 8 Sankey Rd Draftsman 

Orton, Samuel T., 17 Windy Hill Rd Real Estate 

Park, Christine W., 30 King St Housewife 

Parker, Constance W., 36 Parker Ave Housewife 

Railsback, Marita M., 184 Atlantic Ave Housewife 

Ripley, Sheldon N., 63 Sohier St Advertising 

Rosano, Rocco W., 121 Jerusalem Rd Contractor 

Sampson, Kenneth A., 32 Hill St Rubber Worker 

Sands, Arthur F., 20 Church St Retired 

Sanders, G. Stewart, 70 Black Horse Lane Merchant 

Sawchuk, Michael, 302 North Main St Electrician 

Simonds, Henry G., 62 Whitehead Rd Investment Counselor 

Sirois, Richard A., 22 Rustic Drive Stockbroker 

Smith, Donald W., 9 Woodland Drive Insurance 

Sokolowski, Chester, 33 Sohier St Actuary 

Thomas, Gordon C, 58 Old Coach Rd Chemical Engineer 

Thompson, Leslie G., 56 Oak St Foreman 

Tilden, William E., 31 Pleasant St Crane Operator 

Watson, William A., 244 King St Salesman 

Wetzler, Robert T., 61 Highland Ave Vice President 

White, John J., 62 Church St Machinist 

White, William H., 123 Pleasant St Newspaper Man 

Whitley, Roger S., 1 1 Cedar Lane Architect 

Wilson, Robert I., 2 Spindrift Lane Commercial Artist 

Wright, John A., 6 Restrvoir Rd Engineer 



ELECTION OFFICERS AND TELLERS APPOINTED FOR 

THE YEAR 1969 

Manuel A. Marks, Warden Marjorie Wilbur 

Anthony J. Rosano, Deputy Warden Margaret Stoughton 

Edward E. Tower, Clerk Louise A. I^lint 

Irma M. James, Deputy Clerk Frances R. Antoine 

Thomas M. Healy, Jr., Inspector Domenic M. Baccari 



15 



Mary N. Grassie, Inspector Jeanne M. Sullivan 

Grace E. Bowser, Deputy Inspector Rosalie Fitzpatrick 

Robert A. Leonard, Deputy Inspector Margaret C. Hernan 

Thomas J. Silvia, Alternate Inspector Marjorie J. Emanuello 

Arthur L. Lehr, Jr., Alternate Inspector Virginia F. Huntwork 

Ann E. Leonard, Alternate Deputy Frank E. Jason 

Inspector Joseph N. Patrolia 

Samuel Hassan, Alternate Deputy Dorothy C. Bjorkgren 

Inspector Geraldine McEwan 

Frances L. Marks Dorothy C. Morse 

Marjorie E. Antoine Barbara B. Williams 

Margaret E. Buckley Eileen M. Buckley 

Mamie F. Keegan Janice K. Woods 

Teresa M. Perroncello Mary Isabelle Ainslie 

Mary D. Migliaccio Jane B. Tilden 
Helena F. Enos 

TOWN CLERK'S REPORT 
Report Of The Annual Town Meeting Held March 1, 1969 

At the Annual Business Meeting held at the Joseph Osgood School 
at 2:00 P.M., the following articles were contained in the Warrant and 
acted upon as recorded. 

Checkers previously appointed for entrance by the Selectmen and 
sworn in by Town Clerk Charles A. Marks at 1:15 P.M. were Margaret 
Buckley, Mary Isabelle Ainslie, Barbara Williams, Marjorie Wilbur, Mar- 
garet C. Hernan and Mary N. Grassie. 

Tellers appointed by the Moderator and sworn in by the Town Qerk 
at 1:55 P.M. were Frank F. Jason, Edward F. Tower, Arthur L. Lehr, Jr., 
and Thomas J. Silvia. 

The number of voters present as checked on the incoming voting 
lists was 543. 

The meeting was called to order at 2:15 P.M. by Moderator Robert 
B. James and the Town Clerk proceeded to read the call of the meeting. 

The invocation was given by Reverend Joseph T. Brennan. 

ARTICLE 1. VOTED, unanimously by a voice vote, that the Se- 
lectmen be and hereby are authorized and directed to appoint all Town 
Officers not required to be elected by ballot. 

ARTICLE 2. VOTED, unanimously by a voice vote, that the re- 
ports of the various Town Officers as printed in the Annual Town Report 
for the year 1968 be and hereby are accepted. 

RESOLUTION BY ROGER B. COULTER 

RESOLVED 

WHEREAS, Robert B. James will not seek re-election as Moderator 
of the Town of Cohasset in 1969, and 

WHEREAS he has served with distinction in this office continuously 
for 29 years and has demonstrated qualities of integrity, fairness and de- 
votion to the best interests of the Town. 

16 



NOW THEREFORE, the Citizens of Cohasset who have been taught 
by his precept and encouraged by his example record their appreciation of 
his service and their regard for him personally by incorporating this Reso- 
lution in the proceedings of this Town Meeting. 

And the Town Clerk is instructed to send a suitable copy of this 
Resolution to Robert B. James. 

VOTED, unanimously by a voice vote, in the affirmative. 

ARTICLE 3. To hear the report of any committee heretofore 
chosen and act thereon. 

SCHOOL FACILITIES COMMITTEE reports progress and wishes 
to continue. 

VOTED, unanimously by a voice vote, that the report be accepted 
and the committee continue. 

TRANSPORTATION COMMITTEE reports progress and wishes 
to continue. 

VOTED, unanimously by a voice vote, that the report be accepted 
and the committee continue. ^^ 

PUBLIC SEWERAGE SYSTEM STUDY COMMITTEE reports 
progress and wishes to continue. 

VOTED, unanimously by a voice vote, that the report be accepted 
and the committee continue. 

COMMITTEE TO CONSOLIDATE THE BEECHWOOD AND 
NORTH COHASSET FIRE STATIONS reports no progress and wishes 
to be discharged. 

VOTED, by a voice vote, that the committee be discharged. 

WATERSHED COMMITTEE reports progress and wish to continue. 

VOTED, unanimously by a voice vote, that the report be accepted 
and the committee continue. 

GOVERNMENT ISLAND STUDY COMMITTEE reports progress 
and wishes to continue. 

VOTED, unanimously by a voice vote, that the report be accepted 
and the committee continue. 

ARTICLE 4 To hear and act upon the report and recommendations 
of the Personnel Committee, G. Heyward Howkins and others and to see 
if the Town will vote to amend its Personnel Classification By-Law Sched- 
ule bv adopting, or amending and adopting and inserting and substituting 
the following schedule for the schedule heretofore adopted, or act on 
anything relating thereto. 

SCHEDULE NO. 1 HOURLY SALARY SCHEDULE 1969 



Pay Group 


Mi]i.Rate 


1st Step 


ZndStep 


Max. Rate 


SI 


2.12 


2.19 


2.26 


2.33 


82 


2.19 


2.26 


2.33 


2.47 


S3 


2.26 


2.33 


2.47 


2.61 


S4 


2.33 


2.47 


2.61 


2.76 


S5 


2.47 


2.61 


2.76 


2.89 


S6 


2.61 


2.76 


2.89 


3.04 


S7 


2.76 


2.89 
ANNUAL 


3.04 


3.19 



17 



Pay Group 


Mm.Rate 


1st Step 


2nd Step 


Max. Rate 


S8 


6520 


6765 


6988 


7221 


S9 


6950 


7154 


7355 


7559 


SIO 


7349 


7572 


7794 


8018 


Sll 


7660 


7895 


8131 


8368 


S12 


8139 


8394 


8650 


8908 


S13 


8368 


8638 


8907 


9197 


S14 


8868 


9233 


9598 


9960 


S15 


9165 


9527 


9892 


10257 


SCHEDULE NO. 2 


HOURLY AND ANNUAL 




Pay Group 


Min. Rate 


1st Step 


2nd Step 


Max. Rate 


PS9 


3.58/7442 


3.67/7627 


3.76/7821 


3.85/7995 


PSll 


3.89/8087 


3.99/8301 


4.09/8515 


4.20/8730 


PS12 


4.25/8843 


4.31/8976 


4.43/9222 


4.56/9466 


PS15 


9455 


9785 


10117 


10448 


SCHEDULE NO. 3 


HOURLY AND ANNUAL 




Pay Group 


Min. Rate 


1st Step 


2nd Step 


Max. Rate 


FS9 


2.55/7442 


2.62/7627 


2.68/7821 


2.75/7995 


FSll 


2.78/8087 


2.85/8301 


2.93/8515 


3.00/8730 


FS12 


3.03/8843 


3.08/8976 


3.17/9222 


3.25/9466 


FS15 


9455 


9785 


10117 


10448 




The annual pay is the standard 






The hourly pay 


is estimated to the nearest penny. 




SCHEDULE NO. 4 




HOURLY 




Wl 


2.39 


2.47 


2.57 


2.65 


W2 


2.54 


2.63 


2.72 


2.81 


W3 


2.67 


2.76 


2.86 


2.95 


W4 


2.81 


2.89 


2.97 


3.08 


W5 


2.95 


3.03 


3.13 


3.21 


W6 


3.04 


3.15 


3.22 


3.32 


W7 


3.11 


3.18 


3.25 


3.37 


W8 


3.13 


3.21 


3.29 


3.41 


W9 


3.24 


3.33 


3.39 


3.50 


WIO 


3.38 


3.46 


3.54 


3.63 


SCHEDULE NO. 5 


PART TIME POSrilON 


RATE 



Lineman Electrician — Licensed 

Lineman Electrician — Unlicensed 

Caretaker of Perkins Cemetery and Wadleigh Park 

Inspector of Slaughtering and animals 

Superintendent Recreation Fields 



3.41 

2.98 

2.65 

277.00 

500.00 



18 



Clerk Veterans* Agent 








830.00 


Assistant Harbor Master 








100.00 


Member, Board of Registrars 








206.00 


Sealer of Weights and Measures 








487.00 


Superintendent Moth Department 








5,109.00 


Veteran's Agent 








830.00 


Constable — Per Notice 








11.00 


Intermittent Patrolman 








3.13 


Election Officers 








1.94 


Election Clerk 








2.17 


Election Warden 








2.42 


Casual Labor 








2.39 


Director of Civil Defense 








310.50 


Detective Duty Patrolman — Per Week 






7.95 


Intermittent Fireman 








2.39 


Superintendent Sewer Department - 


- for Year 1969 




1,000.00 


Shellfish Constable 








200.00 


Professional (Library) 








3.00/Hr 


Pages (Library) 








L40/Hr 


Custodian (Library) 








3.11/Hr 


Executive Treasurer (Library) 








100.000/Yr. 


Small Parks & Small Parcels of Town Land 




1,350.00 


ALPHABETICAL LIST OF DEPARTMENTS 




Department 


Pay Group 


Schedule 


Hours 


Board of Assessors 










Clerk Typist 




S2 


1 


20 


Clerk 




S6 


1 


35 


Board of Health 










Health Agent 




SIO 


1 




Superintendent Town Dump 




Wl 


4 




Board of Selectmen 










Administrative Secretary 




S5 


1 


35 


Cemetery Department 










Superintendent Woodside Cemetery 


Wl 


4 




Fire Department 










Fire Chief 




FS15 


3 




Deputy Chief 




FS12 


3 


56 


Captain 




FSU 


3 


56 


Private 




FS9 


3 


56 


Harbor Department 










Harbor Master 




S8 


1 




Highway Department 










Working Foreman 




WIO 


4 




Heavy Equipment Operator 




W5 


4 




Laborer, Truck Driver 




W2 


4 




Laborer 




Wl 


4 




Police Department 










Police Chief 




PS15 


2 




Lieutenant 




PS12 


2 


40 


Sergeant 




PSll 


2 


40 


Patrolman 




PS9 


2 


40 


Town Accountant 










Town Accountant 




S14 


1 





19 



Clerk and Assistant Accountant 


S4 




35 


Clerk 


82 




20 


Town Clerk 








Clerk 


82 




25 


Town Commons — Caretaker 


Wl 






Town Hall — Custodian 


88 




60 


Treasurer 








Assistant Treasurer and Clerk 


S4 




35 


Tree and Moth Department 








Working Foreman 


W6 






Skilled Laborer 


Wl 






Water Department 








Superintendent Water Department 


815 






Working Foreman Water Dept. 


WIO 






Serviceman Water Department 


W8 






Pumping Station Oi)erator & Analyst 


. W5 






Utility Man 


W4 






Water and Sewerage Department 








Clerk and Office Assistant 


82 




35 


Wire Department 








Superintendent Wire Department 


F811 






Library 








Chief Librarian 


814 






Assistant Librarian 


87 




35 


Children's Librarian 


87 




23 


General Assistant — II 


82 




35 


General Assistant — I 


81 




10 


Clerk — Typist 


82 




20 


Professional 


Part Time Schedule 




Pages 


Part Time Schedule 




Custodian 


Part Time Schedule 




Executive Treasurer 


Part Time Schedule 





VOTED, by a voice vote, that the report and recommendations of 
the Personnel Committee with respect to amending the Personnel Qassi- 
fication By-Law Schedule be and hereby is accepted and said By-Law 
Schedule is hereby amended by inserting, adopting and substituting the 
following schedule for the schedule heretofore adopted. 
SCHEDULE SAME AS PRINTED ABOVE. 

ARTICLE 5. Voted, by a voice vote, that the report and recom- 
mendations of the Personnel Committee with respect to salaries of the 
Town Elected Officials be and hereby is accepted and the following salary 
schedule for elected oflScials be and hereby is adopted, accepted and sub- 
stituted for the schedule heretofore adopted. 

SALARY SCHEDULE ELECTED OFFICLiLS 

(For Information Only — Not Subject to Compensation Plan) 

1969 ANNUAL RATES 

JOB TITLE 1969 

Tree Warden 2,445.00 

Town Clerk 2,202.00 



20 



Clerk, Board of Registrars 239.00 

Highway Surveyor 8,080.00 

Moderator 150.00 

Town Collector 7,168.00 

Town Treasurer 7.647.00 

Board of Selectmen 

Chairman 1,100.00 

Member 1,000.00 

Board of Assessors 

Chairman 1,300.00 

Member 1,200.00 

ARTICLE 6. VOTED, by a voice vote/ that this article be con- 
sidered covered and acted upon in one vote, that the sum of $3,064,776.02 
be and hereby is raised and appropriated, $34,731.00 for salaries of elect- 
ed Town Oflficers that same being fixed as follows, in each case for the 
ensuing year, effected and retroactive to January 1, 1969, and until the 
Annual Town Meeting in 1970, and $3,030,045.02 for mterest, maturing 
debt, charges, salaries, compensation, operations, maintenance, equipment, 
outlays, capital and otherwise, and expenses of the various departments, 
effective and retroactive as aforesaid, being recommended in all for the 
purpose itemized in subdivisions No. 1 to No. 49 inclusive as follows: 

1 Moderator — Salary 150.00 
la Advisory Committee 

Salary 500.00 

Expenses 75.00 
lb Planning Board 

Clerical Assistance 300.00 

Expenses 410.00 

Ic Personnel Committee — Expenses 115.00 

Id Zoning Board of Appeals — Expenses 350.00 

le Conservation Committee — Expenses 225.00 

2 Selectmen 

Salaries 3,100.00 

Office Salaries 5,531.72 

Expenses 1,351.00 

Capital outlay 294.00 

3 Town Accoimtant 

Accountant Salary and Office Salaries 17,429.71 

Expenses 1,142.00 

3a Out of State Travel 150.00 

4 Town Treasurer 

Salary 7,647.00 

Office Salaries 5,936.00 

Expenses 1,336.50 

4a Out of State Travel 75.00 

5 Town Collector 

Salary 7,168.00 

Office Salaries 1,961,00 

Expenses 1,271.00 

6 Assessors 

Salaries 3,700.00 

Office Salaries 8,256.91 

Expenses 9,925.00 

21 



8 


Law and Legal Counsel 






Salary 


5,000.00 




Expenses 


36.00 


9 


Town Clerk 






Salary 


2,202.00 




Office Salaries 


3,395.98 




Expenses 


1,025.50 


10 


Elections, Registrations and Town Meetings 






Salaries and Wages 


3,286.00 




Expenses 


2,893.00 


10a 


Engineering — Expenses 


300.00 


11 


Town Hall 






Salary and Wages 


7,539.44 




Expenses 


5,030.75 




Capital Outlay 


1,727.00 


12 


Police Department 






Chiefs Salary 


10,311.26 




Regular and Intermittent Patrolmen 






Salaries 


128,532.92 




Expenses 


12,545.00 




Capital Outlay 


2,636.00 


12a 


Out of State Travel 


150.00 


13 


Fire Department 






Chief's Salary 


10,448.00 




Firefighters' Salaries and Wages 


152,744.94 




Paid Holidays 


6,003.55 




Call Men 


6,875.00 




Expenses ■ 


12,970.00 




Capital Outlay 


420.00 


13a 


Out of State Travel 


150.00 


13b 


Police and Fire Headquarters Building 






Expenses 


5,400.00 


14 


Hydrant Services 


24,081.40 


15 


Wire Department 






Superintendent's Salary 


8,730.00 




Wages 


7,721.04 




Expenses 


4,236.00 


15a 


Out of State Travel 


100.00 


16 


Sealing of Weights and Measures 






Salary 


487.00 




Expenses 


48.00 


17 


Insect Pest Control 






Superintendent's Salary 


5,109.00 




Wages 


5,955.32 




Expenses 


3,517.00 


18 


Tree Department 






Tree Warden Salary 


2,445.00 




Wages 


7,106.02 




Expenses 


2,491.00 


19 


Civil Defense 






Salaries 


460.50 




Expenses 


980.00 




Shellfish Constable 






Salary 


200.00 




Expenses 


250.00 



22 



20 


Board of Health 






Health Agent's Salary 


8,018.00 




Expenses 


4,250.00 


20a 


Out of State Travel 


50.00 


21 


Dental clinics for School Children 




22 


Inspection of Animals and Slaughtering 






Salary 


277.00 




Expenses 


25.00 


21a 


District Nurse and other Nursing Services 


6,000.00 


23 


Refuse and Garbage Disposal — Town Dump 






Salary and Wages 


9,075.72 




Expenses 


5,560.00 


24 


Sewer Department 






Superintendent 


1,000.00 




Salary and Wages 


3,500.00 




Expenses 


4,040.00 




Out of State Travel 


150.00 




Capital Outlay 


960.00 


25 


Highways General 






Salary — Surveyor 


8,080.00 




Wages 


46,011.42 




Expenses 


32,175.00 




Capital Outlay 


15,000.00 


26 


Snow and Ice Removal 


30,000.00 


27 


Street Lighting 


17,850.00 


28 


Municipal Garage — Expenses 


1,300.00 


29 


Harbor Department 






Harbor Master 


6^88.00 




Wages 


1,690.00 




Expenses 


2,440.00 




Capital Outlay 


1,000.00 


32 


Veterans Services 






Directors Salary 


830.00 




Office Salary 


830.00 




Expenses 


100.00 




Assistance 


10,000.00 


33 


Schools 






School Committee 


1,315.00 




Superintendent's Office 


35,482.00 




Supervision 


31,100.00 




Principals 


90,713.00 




Teaching 


1,014,379.00 




Textbooks 


20,994.00 




Library 


37,840.00 




Audio Visual 


6,298.00 




Guidance 


35,322.00 




Psycho Logical 


1,500.00 




Television 


966.00 




Attendance 


425.00 




Health 


16,423.00 




Operation Buses 


19,481.00 




Maintenance Buses 


5,350.00 




Contract Buses 


28,560.00 




Athletics 


25,853.00 




Student Activities 


3,897.00 



23 



Custodial 
Heating 
Utilities 
Grounds 

Maintenance Buildings 
Maintenance Equipment 
Small Equipment 
Alteration Buildings 
Acquisition Equipment 
Replacement Equipment 


108,010.00 
14,700.00 
19,000.00 

2,700.00 ■ 

16,910.00 

3,275.00 

381.00 

600.00 

20,617.00 

4,322.00 $1,566,413.00 I 


Less receipts available to School Comm. 


—27,238.00 : 


Net amount to be raised 
School lunches — Salary and Wages 
Expenses 


1,539,175.00 
34,070.00 
61,875.00 95,945.00 


Less Receipts and Federal Grants 


74,555.00 


Net amount to be raised 
33b Out of State Travel — Expenses 
33f Maintenance of State Aided Vocational education 
34 Libraries 

Salaries and Wages 

Expenses 


21,390.00 
1,600.00 
2,400.00 

31,412.00 

15,125.00 46,537.00 



Less Anticipated income 3,260.00 

Net amount to be raised 43,277.00 
35 Parks and Recreation — Town Commons and 

parks salaries and wages 9,122.16 

Expenses 1,145.00 

35a Recreation Committee — Salaries and Wages 3,653.50 

Expenses 2,000.00 

Capitol Outlay 3,365.00 

39a Pensions — Retirement fund — to County 

System 40,534.43 

Non-Contributory Pensions 9,495.20 

39 Memorial Day and other celebrations 1,175.00 
39b Damages to persons and personal property 250.00 
39c Municipal Insurance and Surety Bonds 29,882.00 
39g Employees' Group Insurance 33,996.56 

40 Town Reports 2,665.00 
42 Unclassified and Miscellaneous 320.00 

44 Town Buildings 

Expenses 1,620.00 

Capital Outlay 3,400.00 

45 Parking Places — Maintenance 700.00 

47 Cemeteries 

Superintendent's Wages — 

From Appropriation 4,833.60 

Wages 1,696.00 

Expenses 679.00 

Veterans' Graves 1,575.00 

48 Maturing Debt and Interest 



24 





Interest 






School Debt 


106,161.84 




Police and Fire Headquarters 


4,030.00 




Anticipation of Revenue 


22,667.00 




Anticipation of Highway Reimbursement 


1,540.00 




Sewerage 


13,440.00 


49 


Maturing Debt 






Schools (237,796.00 Less 6,646.69) 


231,149.31 




Police and Fire Headquarters 


10,000.00 




Sewerage 


20,000.00 


46 


Water Department 






Superintendent 


9,786.62 




Wages 


49,716.20 




Expenses 


33,085.00 




Capital Outlay 


4,600.00 


46a 


Interest 


7,139.00 


46b 


Maturing Debt 


36,000.00 


46c 


Employees Group Insurance and retirement 4,372.00 



RESOLUTION BY DOCTOR SCHWAB 

THAT the 1969 Town Meeting inform the Brockton Edison Com- 
pany they appreciate with thanks the effort and hard work done by the 
crews day and night to restore power to the many homes in Cohasset. 

VOTED unanimously by a voice vote in the aflfirmative. 

VOTED unanimously by a voice vote, that this meeting be adjourned 
at 5:30 P.M. and reconvene on Monday, March 3, 1969 at the Joseph 
Osgood School at 8:00 P.M. 

ARTICLE 7. VOTED Unanimously by a voice vote, that the Town 
Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, be and hereby is authorized 
to borrow money from time to time in anticipation of the revenue for the 
financial years beginning January 1, 1969 and January 1, 1970 in accord- 
ance with the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 44, Sec. 4 or as 
amended, and to renew any note or notes as may be given for a period of 
less than one year, in accordance with the provisions of General Laws, 
Chapter 44, Sec. 17 or as amended. 

ARTICLE 8. Voted, by a voice vote, that the sum of $905.85 be 
and hereby is appropriated from available cash in the Treasury being the 
unexpended balance of the Dog Fund received from the County for dog 
licenses, in accordance with Chapter 140, Section 172 of the General 
Laws, to be expended for the support of the public schools. 

ARTICLE 9. Voted, unanimously by a voice vote, that there be and 
hereby is appropriated from available funds in the Treasury for the use 
of the assessors in fixing the tax rate for the enusing year, a sum not ex- 
ceeding $65,000.00 as the Asssessors in their discretion may determine 
advisable. 

25 



ARTICLE 10. Voted, unanimously by a voice vote, that the sum 
of $23,759.39 be appropriated from overlay surplus and $1,240.61 from 
available funds in the Treasury for the establishment of a reserve fund 
for the year 1969. 

ARTICLE 11. Voted, by a voice vote, that the sum of $1,450.00 
be and hereby is raised and appropriated for the purpose of maintaining 
during the ensuing year, the mosquito control works and improvement of 
low lands and swamps as estimated and certified by the State Reclamation 
Board in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 112, Acts of 1931. 

ARTICLE 12. Voted, by a voice vote, that the Town of Cohasset, 
acting under the jurisdiction and provisions of Chapter 252 of the General 
Laws as amended, join in the South Shore Mosquito Control Project in 
conjunction with the City of Quincy, and other towns joining therein and 
that the sum of $4,700.00 be and hereby is raised and appropriated for 
the purpose of paying Cohasset's share thereof, the funds to be paid to 
the Massachusetts Reclamation Board in the discretion of the Board of 
Selectmen if sufficient other municipalities join to justify such action. 

ARTICLE 13. Voted, by a voice vote, that the sum of $1,435.00 
be and hereby is raised and appropriated to be used with the balance of 
prior unexpended appropriations for the Town's proportionate cost for 
the control of insect, vegetable and animal life in Strait's Pond for 1969 
as advised by the State Reclamation Board and as provided by Chapter 
557 of the Acts of 1955 as amended. 

ARTICLE 14. Voted, by a voice vote, that the sum of $45,000.00 
be and hereby is appropriated from available funds in the Treasury for 
the Stabilization Fund, 

ARTICLE 15. Voted, unanimously by a voice vote, that the Town 
assume liability in the manner provided by Section 29 of Chapter 91 of 
the General Laws, as amended by Chapter 5, Acts of 1955, for all damages 
that may be incurred by work to be performed by the Department of 
Public Works of Massachusetts for the improvements development, main- 
tenance and protection of tidal and non-tidal rivers and streams, harbors, 
tide-waters, foreshores, and shores along a public beach outside of Boston 
Harbor, including the Merrimack and Connecticut Rivers, in accordance 
with Section 11 of Chapter 91 of the General Laws, and authorize the 
Selectmen to execute and deliver a bond of indemnity therefor to the 
Commonwealth. 

ARTICLE 16. Voted by a voice vote, that the sum of $17,976.00 
be and hereby is raised and appropriated for the use of the South Shore 
Regional School District for 1969 to pay Cohasset's share of assessment 
for the South Shore Regional School District. 

ARTICLE 17. Voted unanimously by a voice vote, that the sum 

26 



of $1,460.00 be and hereby is raised from available funds in the Treasury 
for library maintenance, this sum being received from the State Aid for 
Free Public Libraries in accordance with General Laws, Chapter 44, Sec- 
tion 53 and Chapter 78, Section 19A. 

ARTICLE 18. Voted by a voice vote, that the Town vote to amend 
the Town of Cohasset, Massachusetts Personnel Classification and Com- 
pensation Plan By-Law by striking out Paragraph 3 of Section 2; Appli- 
cation and Coverage of Part I; GENERAL so that said Section 2 shall 
read: 

Section 2: Application and Coverage 

The provisions of this By-Law shall apply to all positions in the Town, 

except as follows: 

1 . Those filled by general election 

2. Those under the control of the School Committee 

Nothing herein, however, shall prohibit reference to this By-Law for 
assistance in determining the compensation and benefits of Town Em- 
ployees not covered by the By-Law, said amendment to be effective as 
of January 1, 1969. 

ARTICLE 19. MOVED that the Town vote to amend the Per- 
sonnel Classification and Compensation Plan By-Law, which amendment 
is to be effective as of January 1, 1969, by adding at the end of the 
Classification of Police Department the following paragraph: 
Full time members of the Police Department are hereby granted longevity 
payments of $75.00 for each five years of service on the Police force up 
to a maimum of twenty years of service and to raise and/or appropriate 
a sum of $1,800.00 therefor. 

Motion defeated by a voice vote in the negative. 

At 5:40 P.M. the meeting was adjourned until Monday, March 3, 
1969, at 8:00 P.M. 

Monday, March 3, 1969 

At 8:00 P.M., Moderator Robert B. James called the meeting to 
order. 

VOTED unanimously by a voice vote, that the meeting be adjourned 
because of a lack of a quorum and that said meeting be re-convened at 
the Joseph Osgood School on Tuesday, March 4, 1969, at 8:00 P.M. 

Tuesday, March 4, 1969 

Checkers previously appointed by the Selectmen reported for work 
at 7:15 P.M. 

The Moderator opened the meeting at 8:20 P.M. The number of 

27 



voters present as checked on the incoming voting lists was 295. 

ARTICLE 20. Voted by a voice vote, that the Town vote to raise 
and appropriate the sum of $1,500.00 for reconstruction and resurfacing 
of existing sidewalks in need thereof. 

RESOLUTION BY GEORGE W. MC LAUGHLIN 

RESOLVED: That the Selectmen be and hereby are directed to 
appoint a Committee to prepare and submit to a Special Town Meeting, 
to be called at the earliest practicable opportunity, but in any event no 
later than June 30, 1969, a revised and updated Zoning By-Law, designed 
to meet and help solve the problems presently faced by the Town. 

Voted, unanimously by a voice vote in the afiBrmative. 

ARTICLE 21. Voted unanimously by a voice vote, that the sum 
of $6,000.00 be and hereby is appropriated for Maintenance of Highways 
under Chapter 90 of the General Laws and to meet said appropriation 
$2,000.00 be and hereby is raised and appropriated to meet the Town's 
share thereof; to meet the State and County share thereof that the Treas- 
urer, with the approval of the Selectmen, be and hereby is authorized to 
borrow $4,000.00 by temporary loan and to issue a note therefore in 
accordance with Section 6 A Chapter 44 of the General Laws in anticipa- 
tion of reimbursement from the State and County of their share thereof. 

ARTICLE 22. Voted by a voice vote, that the sum of $19,586.85 
be and hereby is appropriated for Chapter 90 Highway Construction for 
Ehn Street, and Forest Avenue, and to meet said appropriation $4,896.71 
be and hereby is raised and appropriated to meet the Town's share 
thereof; to meet the State and County share thereof that the Treasurer, 
with the approval of the Selectmen, be and hereby is authorized to bor- 
row $14,690.14 by temporary loan and to issue a note therefor in ac- 
cordance with Section 6A, Chapter 44 of the General Laws in anticipation 
of reimbursement from the State and County of their sheire thereof. 

MOTION BY GILBERT S. TOWER 

Moved that the Selectmen be authorized to name streets for which 
Chapter 90 Construction money is requested by the town, at the meeting 
in September 1969 at which towns make their request for Chapter 90 
money for 1970. 

Defeated by a voice vote in the negative. 

ARTICLE 23. Voted by a voice vote, that the sum of $5,000.00 
be and hereby is raised and appropriated for the reconstruction, resurfac- 
ing, and installation of necessary drainage on Ash Street. 

ARTICLE 24. Voted unanimously by a voice vote, that the Town 
accept Section 5 of Chapter 616 of the Acts of 1967 and that the sum of 

28 



$7681.76 be and hereby is appropriated from funds received or to bo 
received from the Commonwealth of Massachusetts in accordance with 
Chapter 616 of the Acts of 1967, Section 5 for the reconstruction, re- 
surfacing and installation of necessary drainage on highways. 

ARTICLE 25. Voted by a voice vote, that the Town vote to raise 
and appropriate a sum of $2,500.00 for the clearance of brooks and 
streams. 

ARTICLE 26. MOVED, that the Town hereby authorizes its 
Treasurer to act as Town Collector in accordance with the provisions of 
General Laws Chapter 41, Section 1, and that commencing with the 
Town election in 1970, the Town shall ballot on the election of a Treas- 
urer-Collector, such individual when elected to serve for a term of three 
years. 

The Moderator called for a voice vote and was in doubt. A hand vote 
was then called and the motion was defeated, 135 voting yes and 137 
voting no. 

ARTICLE 27. MOVED that the Selectmen are directed to include 
in 1970 and subsequent Town budgets under the category of Town En- 
gineer-Engineering, such sum or sums sufficient for the use of themselves 
and such other Boards and Departments as may request the same, as will 
provide for any and all engineering and technical assistance required by 
the various Boards and Departments, the Selectmen to have the direction 
of the expenditures of such sums. 

Voted by a voice vote, in the negative. 

ARTICLE 28. Voted by a voice vote, that this meeting favors 
the operation of Town Public Works by the consolidation and coordina- 
tion of all such operations in a Public Works Department m accordance 
with General Laws Chapter 41, Sections 69c through 69f or through 
such modification thereof as may be suitable for the Town and that the 
Committee appointed to study the administration of Town affairs is in- 
structed to submit detailed plans and articles to implement the creation 
of such a department for the Annnual Town meeting in 1970. 

ARTICLE 29. MOVED that the Town hereby accepts the pro- 
visions of General Laws Chapter 41, Section 23 A authorizing and em- 
powering the Selectmen to appoint an Executive Secretary to serve in 
accordance with the provisions thereof. 

Voted by a voice vote, in the negative, 

RESOLUTION BY WILLIAM MONTUORI 

RESOLVED that the Selectmen acting as the chief executive branch 
of town government establish a coordinating committee with said com- 
mittee consisting of a member from each of the regulatory boards, such 

29 



as health, conservation, plannmg, highway surveyor and others for the 
purpose of evaluating and coordinating their current activities and for 
proposing future activities that may be required for the overall public 
interest. Voted, by a hand vote in the affirmative, yes, 154 to no, 97. 

ARTICLE 30. Voted by a voice vote, that the Town vote to raise 
and appropriate the sum of $5,000.00 to accomplish necessary repairs to 
the stone-masonry work on Lawrence Wharf, so-called, continuing to 
the Veterans' Memorial Park, so-called. 

ARTICLE 31. Voted by a voice vote, that the Town vote to raise 
and appropriate the sum of $1,000.00 as the Town's share for a pre- 
liminary survey of all stone-masonry walls in Cohasset Harbor, in the 
vicinity of the "Cove", said survey to be made by the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts Department of Waterways under the provisions of Gen- 
eral Laws Chapter 91. 

ARTICLE 32. Voted unanimously by a voice vote, that the Town 
vote to amend Article 21 of the By-Laws of the Town of Cohasset by 
striking the words "the size and specifications for" in the first sentence 
of Paragraph 2 section II so that same shall read as follows: "The Harbor 
Master shall prepare regulations governing moorings, their hardware and 
pennants, and shall submit the same to the Selectmen for approval". 

ARTICLE 33. Voted unanimously by a voice vote, that the Town 
vote to amend Article 21 of the By-Laws of the Town of Cohasset by 
adding to Section II an additional paragraph following paragraph 9 as 
follows: 

Any mooring placed within the limits of Cohasset Harbor in violation 
of the foregoing provisions may be removed by the Harbor Master at 
the expense of the owner if the owner shall fail to remove the same after 
notice in writing from the Harbor Master. 

ARTICLE 34. Voted by a voice vote, that the Town vote to create 
a Council on Agmg and to adopt the following By-Law in accordance with 
the provisions of Chapter 40 Section 8 B as amended of the General 
Laws (Ter. Ed.) of Massachusetts. 

Section 1. The Board of Selectmen shall appoint a Council on Aging 
for the purpose of co-ordinating or carrying out programs designed to 
meet the problems of the aging in cooperation with programs of the Com- 
mission on Aging established under Chapter 6, Section 73 of the General 
Laws. 

Section 2. The Board of Selectmen shall appoint the Council on 
Aging consisting of nine (9) members. Upon acceptance of this by-law, 
the Board shall appoint three (3) members for three (3) years, three (3) 
members for two (2) years and three (3) members for one (1) year. There- 
after, each member shall be appointed for a three (3) year term. The 
members of the Council shall serve without pay. 

30 



Section 3. Whenever a vacancy shall occur in the membership of the 
Council, by reason of death, resignation, inability to act or for any other 
reason, the vacancy shall be fiUed by appointment by the Selectmen for 
the remainder of the term. 

Section 4. The Council on Aging at its first annual meeting and there- 
after, annually in April of each year, shall elect from its membership 
a President, Vice President, Secretary and Treasurer. Each officer shall 
hold office until the next annual election. In the event a vacancy occurs 
in any of the offices above, the Council shall hold a special meeting for 
the purpose of electing one of its members to fill such vacancy. 
Section 5. The Council shall prepare and submit an annual report of 
its activities to the Town and shall send a copy thereof to the Commission 
on Aging. 

Section 6. The Council may appoint such clerks and other employees 
as it may require. 

ARTICLE 35. Voted by a hand vote, yes, 190 to no, 54, that the 
Town vote to raise and appropriate under the authority of Massachusetts 
General Laws (Ter. Ed.) Chapter 40, Section 5 (49) the sum of $350.00 
for the purpose of coordinating or conducting programs dealing with 
problems of the aging and to promote facilities for the health, education, 
welfare and recreation of the aging. 

ARTICLE 36. Voted by a voice vote, that the Town vote under 
Massachusetts General Laws (Ter. Ed) Chapter 121, Section 26K, as 
amended, to establish a Housing Authority and in that connection to 
make any and all determinations and declarations deemed necessary or 
desirable. 

RESOLUTION BY JOHN CURLEY 

Be it resolved that the Board of Selectmen be authorized and directed 
to solicit invitations for bid quotations and or proposals on a schedule of 
coverages of town municipal casualty and employees group insurance to be 
prepared and approved by the Insurance Advisory Board. 

VOTED by a voice vote in the affirmative to accept this resolution. 

ARTICLE 37, Voted by a voice vote, that the Town vote to 
rescind the action taken by the 1964 Town Meeting under Article 40 
wherein the vote was as follows: 

Voted unanimously by a voice vote, that the sum of $6,000.00 be and 
hereby is appropriated and transferred from the sale of Cemetery Lots 
Fund; Woodside for the improvement of Woodside Cemetery including 
filling, grading and installing of a 2 face fixed stone wall approximately 
470 feet long to match existing stone wall. 

ARTICLE 38. Voted unanimously by a voice vote, that the Town 

31 



vote that the sum of $4,000.00 be appropriated and transferred from Sale 
of Cemetery Lots Fmids; Woodside for the improvement and enlargement 
of Woodside Cemetery, including, but not restricted to the cutting of trees, 
removal of stumps, laying out of lots, constructing paths and avenues, 
and embellishing the grounds, and engineemg services and contingencies 
in connection therewith, and or anything relating thereto. 

ARTICLE 39. Voted unanimously by a voice vote, that the Town 
approve a petition for the enactment by the general court of a special 
law providing for the reimbursement of the Town of Cohasset and certain 
other towns for loss of taxes on land on which the former United States 
Naval Ammunitin Depot was located, which land is now owned by the 
Commonwealth and held by the Department of Natural Resources for 
recreational and conservation purposes. 

ARTICLE 40. Moved that the sum of $1,250.00 be and hereby 
is appropriated from available funds in the custody of the Treasurer, 
Veterans Memorial Park Fund and that $6,250.00 be and hereby is 
raised and appropriated to obtain and set in place a bronze honor roll to 
be located at the Veterans' Memorial Park, so-called, and to remove the 
honor roll presently located at the Town Common. 

Motion Defeated by a unanimous voice vote in the negative. 

ARTICLE 41. Voted by a voice vote, that the Town vote to es- 
tablish as a Town Way and accept the layout of Old Coach Road as laid 
out by the Selectmen and shown on plan and layout on file in the Town 
Clerk's office; authorize the Selectmen to acquire by eminent domain 
or otherwise such rights, titles and easements in such land as is necessary 
therefor and to accomplish said purpose; and the sum of $50.00 be and 
hereby is appropriated. 

ARTICLE 42. Voted by a voice vote, that the Board of Selectmen 
be and hereby is authorized to appoint a Committee of five citizens to 
make a comprehensive study of all town buildings. 

ARTICLE 43. Voted by a voice vote, that the Town vote to trans- 
fer and appropriate from available funds the sum of $1,333.18 represent- 
ing the unexpended balance of the Bond issue for the construction of Fire 
and Police Headquarters Building to enable the Fire and Police Head- 
quarters Building on Elm Street to be tied into the municipal sewerage 
treatment plant by laying out, constructing, installing and connecting 
sewer pipes and/ or lines from said building to a receiving manhold on 
Elm Street. 

ARTICLE 44. Voted unanimously by a voice vote, that the Town 
accept Section 16A of Chapter 54 of the Massachusetts General Laws 
(ter. Ed.) which section reads as follows: "In any city or town which ac- 
cepts this section, if the warden, clerk, or inspector, or the deputy of any 

32 



such officer, if any, is not present at the opening of the polls, the city or 
Town Clerk may appoint a person to fill such vacancy who shall be an 
enrolled voter of the same political party as the absent officer, if any 
competent person enrolled in such party is present and willing to serve." 

ARTICLE 45. Voted unanimously by a voice vote, that the Town 
vote to raise and appropriate the sum of five thousand dollars (5,000.00) 
to aid in celebrating the two hundredth anniversary of the incorporation 
of Cohasset as a Town, the same to be expended under the direction of 
the Bicentennial Committee. 

ARTICLE 46. Voted by a voice vote, that the Town raise and ap- 
propriate the sum of $2,800.00 to be expended by the Recreation Commis- 
sion to conduct a ten (10) week (5 days per week) Summer program for 
the children of the town, ages 4 through 12. 

ARTICLE 47. Voted by a hand vote yes, 113, to No, 87, that the 
sum of $6,400.00 be and hereby is raised and appropriated to the use of 
the School Facilities Committee during the ensuing year for engaging 
engineers and/or professional consultants to conduct feasibility studies, 
to engage appraisers and for any other use relating to the study of future 
school sites and their recommendation thereof to a future town meeting. 

ARTICLE 48. To see what sum of money the Town will vote to 
raise and/or appropriate for the construction and operation of all or any 
part of a system or systems of sewerage or sewage disposal as provided in 
Chapter 65 of the Acts of 1962 and to determine how said money shall be 
raised, whether by transfer from available funds, taxation, by borrowing or 
otherwise, or act on anything relating thereto. 

Voted, unanimously by a voice vote, that this article be indefinitely 
postponed. 

MOVED AND VOTED unanimously by a voice vote at 11:50 p.m. 
that this meeting be adjourned until Saturday, March 8, 1969 at 8:00 
A.M. for the Election of Town Officials. 

Respectfully submitted 

ATTEST: CHARLES A. MARKS, Town Clerk 



ELECTION OF MARCH 8, 1969 

The Town Clerk read the Warrant. 

To cast and/or give in their votes upon the Official Ballot for the 
following Officers: 

Moderator for three years; One Selectman for three years; One Assessor 
for three years; Highway Surveyor for three years; Two members of the 
School Committee for three years each; One member of the Board of 

33 



Health for three years; Three Trustees of the Cohasset Free Public Library 
for three years each; One member of the Planning Board for five years; 
One Water Commissioner for three years; One member of the Recreation 
Commission for five years, and One member of the South Shore Regional 
School Committee for three years. 

The Polls for the reception of ballots will be kept open until 6:00 P.M. 
and for such further time as the voters present by vote shall determine, but 
in no case after 8:00 P.M. 

The Polls were opened at 8:00 o'clock A.M. by Moderator Robert B. 
James. Proceeded to vote for Town Officers on the Official Ballot. 

At 6:00 P.M. a motion was made, seconded and voted that the polls 

be closed. 

The ballot box registered 2097. The Ballot Check List at entrance 
had 1930 names checked and the ballot box check list at exit had 1930 
names checked. The Election Officers counted all ballots cast and there 
were 1930 regular ballots cast and 167 absentee ballots cast making a 
total of 2097 ballots cast. 

The vote was declared at 10:00 P.M. At 10:15 P.M. a motion was 
made, seconded and so voted that this meeting be dissolved. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHARLES A. MARKS, Town Qerk 



MODERATOR FOR THREE 
YEARS 

Richard D. Leggat 835 

Robert L. Pennington 89 

David E. Place 1157 

Blanks 16 

SELECTMAN FOR THREE 
YEARS 

Arthur L. Qark 1798 

Scattering 4 

Blanks 295 

ASSESSOR FOR THREE 
YEARS 

Robert V. Jackson 429 

Michael C. Patrolia 693 

Warren S. Pratt 903 

Blanks 72 

HIGHWAY SURVEYOR FOR 
THREE YEARS 

Louis C. Bailey, Jr 1793 

Scattering 1 

Blanks 303 



TRUSTEES COHASSET FREE 

PUBLIC LIBRARY FOR 

THREE YEARS 

SheHa S. Evans 1680 

Donald R. Hammonds 1560 

Bettina H. Pratt 1605 

Blanks 1446 

BOARD OF HEALTH FOR 
THREE YEARS 

William J. Montuori 1693 

Blanks 404 



PLANNING BOARD FOR 
FIVE YEARS 

Lawrence D. Ainslie 1724 

Blanks 373 



WATER COMMISSIONER FOR 
THREE YEARS 

Henry W. Ainslie, Jr 1748 

Blanks 349 



34 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE FOR SOUTH SHORE REGIONAL 

THREE YEARS SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Louis N. Simeone 957 FOR THREE YEARS 

EUen P. Smith 1447 John A. Geary 1743 

Sumner Smith, Jr 1136 Blanks 354 

Scattering 1 

Blanks 653 

RECREATIONAL COMMISSION 
FOR FIVE YEARS 

William G. O'Brien 1681 

Blanks 416 

REPORT OF THE SPECIAL TOWN MEETING HELD 
DECEMBER 1, 1969 

At the Special Business Meeting held at the Joseph Osgood School at 
8:00 o'clock P.M., December 2, 1969, the following articles were con- 
tained in the Warrant and acted upon as recorded: 

Checkers previously appointed for entrance by the Selectmen and 
sworn in by Town Clerk Charles A. Marks at 7:15 P.M. were Mary Fiori, 
Margaret Buckley, Isabelle Ainslie, Mary N. Grassie, Barbara Williams, 
and Margaret C. Hernan. 

Tellers appointed by the Moderator and sworn in by the Town Clerk 
at 7:15 P.M. were Frank E. Jason, Arthur L. Lehr Jr., Thomas J. Silvia, 
and Edward E. Tower. 

The number of voters present as checked on the incoming voting 
lists was 519. 

The meeting was opened at 8:15 P.M. by Moderator David E. Place 
and the Town Clerk proceeded to read the call of the meeting. 

The invocation was given by Rev. Edward T. Atkinson. 



ARTICLE 1. VOTED By a hand vote YES 405 to NO 1, that 
the sum of $2,500.00 be and hereby is apppropriated from available funds 
in the Treasury to aid in celebrating the 200th Anniversary of the In- 
corporation of Cohasset as a town, the same to be expended under the 
directions of the Bicentennial Committee and to be added to the sum 
appropriated under Article 45 of the 1969 Annual Town Meeting. 

ARTICLE 2. VOTED By a voice vote that the foUowing sums 
of money be and hereby are appropriated from available funds in the 
Town Treasury: 

$2,000.00 to Highway Department for snow removal 

1,000,00 to Department of Veterans Assistance 

1,122.97 to Tree Department for wages 

35 



300.00 to Elections and Registrations for wages 
1,500.00 to Elections and Registrations expenses 

ARTICLE 3. VOTED By a voice vote, that the sum of $7,000.00 
be and hereby is appropriated from available water surplus for the pur- 
pose of conducting a perimeter land survey and furnishing a land plan 
acceptable for recording at the registry of deeds to describe a tract of land 
that will circumscribe the limits of a proposed water supply reservoir on 
the Aaron River in the Beechwood Section of the Town; 
Said survey and plan to establish, stake out, and set forth the projx)sed 
shore line of the reservoir, metes and bounds of the above mentioned 
tract of land and necessary permanent bounds. 

RESOLUTION BY GLEN A. PRATT 

RESOLVED: That a committee be appointed by the moderator 
to study and propose a fitting memorial to those Cohasset men who have 
given their lives in the service of their country during the period known 
as the Viet Nam conflict. 

The committee to make a preliminary report of progress to the 
annual meeting in March 1970. 

VOTED By a voice vote. 

ARTICLE 4. VOTED By a voice vote, that the Town accept as a gift 
with thanks, from Hector J. Pelletier, a parcel of land on Sankey Road for 
municipal purposes, which parcel is bounded and described as follows: 
Easterly: by land now or formerly of Home Owner's Loan Corporation, 

Bertha E. Freeman, Clarence S. Reddy and Albert E. Grassie, 382.59 feet; 

Southerly: by Lot 17A 129.58 feet; Sankey Road 40 feet; and by Lot 8A 

131.13 feet; 

Westerly: by land now or formerly of Roman Catholic Archbishop of 

Boston and William McGaw, 453.25 feet; 

Northerly: by the James River. 

Said parcel is shown as Lots 9A and 18A on a plan drawn by Lewis 
W. Perkins, Engineer, dated August 3, 1938 as modified and approved 
by Land Court filed m the Land Registration Office as No. 16584D, a 
copy of a portion of which is filed in Norfolk Registry District with Cer- 
tificate No. 22437, sheets 1 and 2, Vol. 113. 

ARTICLE 5. VOTED by a voice vote, that the town authorize 
and direct the Board of Selectmen to appoint an Insurance Committee, 
the number and qualifications of members of the committee to be at the 
discretion of the Board of Selectmen; that the committee shall advise the 
Board of Selectmen in all insurance matters; and that the Board of Select- 
men shall be required to receive competitive bids for the costs of all 
insurance coverage, said system of competitive bidding shall be in opera- 
tion on or before the calendar year 1971. 

36 



ARTICLE 6. REPORT OF THE COHASSET PLANNING BOARD 
ON PROPOSED AMENDMENTS TO THE EXISTING ZONING 
CODE AS REQUIRED BY SECTION 6 OF CHAPTER 40A OF THE 
GENERAL LAWS. 

At the 1969 Annual Town Meeting a committee to consider changes in 
the Zoning By-Law to "broaden the tax base" was created by resolution. 
Said committee having been duly appointed and having prepared a new 
zoning code, the Planning Board held a hearing, as required by Section 
6 of Chapter 40A of the general laws, on November 4, 1969, at 8 P.M., 
at the Cohasset Town Hall after the required advertisement of the hearing 
with the text of the proposed change fully set forth in the South Shore 
Mirror. Some 80 persons were present at the hearing. After the Zoning 
Committee had explained the proposed changes in the code and map, 
the hearing was thrown open to questions and comments. At about 10 
P.M. all speakers having been heard, the hearing was dissolved. 

On November 5, 1969, the Planning Board held one of it regular bi- 
monthly meetings at which, a quorum being present, approval of the 
general zoning map and the flood plain zone map was Voted. 

Subsequent to the hearing and based on some suggestions of the hearing 
attendants, the Zoning Committee made some slight changes in the amend- 
ment proposed. 

The Planning Board is not the sponsor of the amendment before the 
meeting tonight. Nor is it required to be since this amendment has not 
been considered in the past two years. The Planning Board, however, does 
feel that the code should be constantly examined and changed as needed 
and hence wants this amendment to be exposed to the sharp scrutiny of 
Town Meeting and after careful consideration to be accepted or rejected. 
The amendment does away with 40,000 sq. ft. zones entirely, the largest 
new zone being 30,000 sq. ft. Side line distances, set-back, and back yard 
depths are specified. The map shows an enlargement of the Chief Justice 
Gushing business zone by increasing the depth on the West side. A light 
industry district and small flood plain area are included and Garden Type 
apartments are provided for. Regulations controlling earth removal and 
public display of junk are included. 

The amendment is more restrictive of the general uses of the property of 
home owners. More factors are controlled making enforcement more in- 
volved and more difficult. The Appeal Board would be busier; the Plan- 
ning Board, Board of Health and Conservation Commission would be 
consulted in Appeal Board considerations. 

The Planning Board takes the position that the nature of the Town wiU 

be, and properly should be, in the hands of its citizens and that the vote 

on this amendment will go a long way toward directing the future aspect 

of the Town and its economy as development proceeds. 

A "yes" vote of 2/3 rds of those voting will be required to pass the 

amendment. 

37 



Slight errors in the printing of the zoning map necessitates four slight 
changes: 

First, the section marked RA adjacent to Bassing Beach should 
read RB. 

Second, Howe should read HaU. 

Third, to perfect location of Aaron River Road and Flintlock Ridge 
Road on zoning map to more accurately show these Roads 
as they are shown on the Subdivision Plan of Land in Co- 
hasset, dated June 14, 1966, recorded with Norfolk Deeds 
as Plans No. 276, 277 and 278 or 1967 in Plan Book 222. 

Fourth, in the map legend the symbol "State,, Municipal and Reser- 
vation Land" should be stricken. 

We recommend that the Map as hereby corrected be accepted for action 
in connection with the proposed zoning amendment, which is also recom- 
mended. 

Respectfully submitted, 

NORMAN W. BROWN 
LAWRENCE D. AINSLIE 
NATHAN W. BATES 
JOHN H. BARRETT 
GILBERT S. TOWER 

Amendment to Article 6. 

MOVED: that the Town amend its existing Zoning By-Law and Zoning 
Map by deleting the same in their entirety and substituting therefore a new 
Zoning By-Law and new Zoning Map including Flood Plain Zone Map 
as follows: (as printed deleting Section 4 B 3) 

VOTED BY A HAND VOTE, YES 196 NO 149 

ARTICLE 6. VOTE ON MAIN MOTION AS AMENDED. 

VOTED by a hand vote in the Affirmative YES 330 to NO 25 that the 
Town amend its existing Zoning By-Law and Zoning Map by deleting the 
same in their entirety and substituting therefore a new Zoning By-Law 
and new Zoning Map as corrected including Flood Zone Map, as follows: 

ARTICLE 6. 

PROPOSED AMENDMENT TO ZONING BY-LAW FOR THE 

TOWN OF COHASSET, MASSACHUSETTS 

Purpose 

A. By-Law to promote the health, safety, convenience and welfare 
of the inhabitants, and to facilitate the adequate provision of transporta- 
tion, water, sewerage, parks, schools, and other public requirements; to 
accomplish the most appropriate use of land, and to conserve the value 

38 



of land and buildings by districting the Town and regulating land use 
therein; to protect and preserve the outstanding characteristics and natural 
beauty of the Town with due consideration given to the geography, 
topography and history of Cohasset. 

Section 1. Establishment of Districts. 

A. TYPES OF DISTRICTS. 

For the purposes of this By-Law, the Town of Cohasset is hereby 
divided into the following types of districts, which shall be known, in 
order of general restrictiveness, beginning with the most restrictive as: 

Residence C Districts 
Residence B Districts 
Residence A Districts 
Business Districts 
Light Industry Districts 

B. LOCATION OF DISTRICTS. 

Said districts are located and bounded as shown on the map entitled 
"Zoning District Map of the Town of Cohasset, Massachusetts," dated 
October 1, 1969 and filed, together with any and all amendments thereto 
subsequently adopted, in the office of the Town Qerk. Said map, together 
with all explanatory matter thereon and amendments thereto, is hereby 
incorporated in and made part of this By-Law, and is hereinafter re- 
ferred to as the "Zoning Map." 

C. BOUNDARIES OF DISTRICTS. 

The location of the boundary lines of the districts shown upon the 
Zoning Map shall be determined as follows: 

1. Where the district boundary line follows a stream, pond or other 
body of water, said boundary line shall be construed to be at the thread 
or channel of the stream, or at the limit of the jurisdiction of the town. 

2. Where the boundary lines are shown upon said map within the 
street lines of public or private ways, the center lines of such ways shall 
be the boundary lines. 

3. Where a boundary line is shown outside of the lines of a street 
or railroad and approximately parallel thereto, such boundary line shall 
be deemed parallel to the exterior line thereof; and where a figure is 
placed upon the Zoning Map between such boundary line and the street 
or railroad, it indicates the distance in feet of such boundary line from 
such exterior line (measured at right angles thereto, unless otherwise 
designated). 

4. Where a boundary line is shown approximately on the location 
of a property or lot line and the exact location of the boundary line is 
not indicated by means of a figure or otherwise, then the property or lot 
line shall be the boundary line. 

5. In any case not covered by the other provisions of this para- 

39 



graph, the location of a boundary line shall be determined by the distance 
in feet, if given, from other lines upon the Zoning Map ,or if distances 
are not given, then by the scale of the Zoning Map. 

D. LOTS IN MORE THAN ONE DISTRICT 

Where a district boundary line divides a lot laid out and duly re- 
corded prior to the effective date of the establishment of such boundary, 
the regulations applying to the less restricted district may be con- 
sidered as extending not more than fifty (50) feet into the portion of the 
lot in the more restricted district, but only if the lot has frontage on a 
street in the less restricted district; provided, however, the Board of 
Appeals may, as a special exception, authorize the increase of this dis- 
tance to not more than two hundred (200) feet subject to the general 
provisions hereinafter set forth for authorizing additional uses in the less 
restricted district in question. 

Section lA. Special Flood Plain And Watershed Protection Zone 

A. ESTABLISHMENT OF ZONE. 

1. In addition to the districts hereinbefore set forth, a special zone 
is hereby established to be known as: Flood Plain Zone. 

This zone is located as shown on the map entitled "Additional 
Zoning Map Showing Flood Plain Zone, Town of Cohasset," dated June 
10, 1963, modified by Edwin A. Young, R.L.S.., October 1, 1969, and 
filed in the office of the Town Clerk, which map, together with all explan- 
atory matter thereon and amendments thereto, is hereby incorporated in 
and made a part of this By-Law, and is hereinafter referred to as the 
"Flood Plain Map." 

2. For the purposes of this By-Law, the Flood Plain Zone shall 
be considered as super-imposed on the other districts existing in the same 
area as shown on the Zoning Map and any building, structure or land 
included within the Flood Plain Zone shall also be deemed to be within 
the particular district in which it is located, as shown on the Zoning Map, 
and subject to all the restrictions and regulations thereof (in addition to 
those set forth in this Section). 

3. The location of the boundary lines of the Flood Plain Zone as 
shown on the Flood Plain Map shall be determined in the same manner 
as hereinbefore set forth for determining the location of boundary lines 
of the districts shown on the Zoning Map. 

B. SPECIAL PERMIT REQUIRED. 

1. In the Flood Plain Zone, no building or structure shall be con- 
structed or used, and no land shall be filled, excavated or otherwise 
changed in grade except pursuant to a special permit therefor issued by 
the Board of Appeals as hereinafter provided. 

2. Any application for such special permit shall be submitted to 
the Board of Appeals. The application shall be accompanied by a plan 
of the premises in question, submitted in triplicate, showing: (i) the 

40 



boundaries and dimensions of the lot (ii) the location, dimensions, and 
elevations of existing and proposed buildings and structures thereon, 
(iii) the existing contours of the land and any proposed changes therefrom, 
and (iv) such other information as is deemed necessary by the Board of 
Appeals to indicate the complete physical characteristics of the proposed 
construction and/or grading. 

C. REFERENCE TO OTHER BOARDS 

Within ten (10) days after receipt of the application for a special 
permit for construction and/ or grading in the Flood Plain Zone, the 
Board of Appeals shall transmit copies thereof, together with copies of 
the accompanying plan, to the Board of Health, the Planning Board and 
the Conservation Commission. All such Boards may, in their discretion, 
investigate the application and report in writing their recommendations 
to the Board of Appeals. The Board of Appeals shall not take final action 
on such application until it has received a report thereon from the Board 
of Health, the Planning Board, and the Conservation Commission, or 
until said Boards have allowed thirty (30) days to elapse after receipt of 
such application without submission of a report. 

D. CRITERIA FOR APPROVAL 

1. The Board of Appeals shall issue a permit hereunder (sub- 
ject to other provisions of this By-Law) if it finds that the proposed 
construction, use and/or proposed change in grade will not endanger, 
during time of flood, the health or safety of the occupants of the premises 
in question or of other land in or directly adjacent to the Flood Plain Zone. 

There shaU be a presumption, rebuttable only by affirmative evidence, 
that the proposed construction, use and/or proposed change in grade will 
not endanger in time of flood the health or safety of the occupants of any 
affected premises if it appears from the plan submitted in accordance 
with the provisions of Sub section B2 of this section that no portion of 
the living or working quarters of cellar floor of the proposed structure 
and no portion of the private sewerage disposal system thereof is (a) 
less than five feet above a point now marked by designation BM4 if 
the proposed structure is located southeast of Sohier Street, or (b) less 
than twenty-five feet above the said point if the proposed structure is 
located northwest of Sohier Street. 

2. In deciding applications for a permit under this Section, but 
without limiting the generality of the foregoing, the Board shall assure 
to a degree consistent with a reasonable use of the premises for purposes 
permitted in the use district in which located: 

(a) That the proposed construction, use and/or change in grade 
will not obstruct or divert flood flow or reduce natural flood storage to 
the extent of substantially raising the high water level on any land in the 
same Zone. 

(b) That the proposed system of drainage and/or private sewage 
disposal will not cause pollution or otherwise endanger the public healt5i. 

41 



(c) That the proposed construction will have sufficient structural 
safety to counteract buoyancy and/or water impact. 

(d) That the main floor level of any buildings to be occupied by 
human beings during night time hours will be at least one foot above 
high water level. 

E. CONDITIONS OF PERMIT 

In granting a permit hereunder, the Board of Appeals shall impose 
conditions specially designed to safeguard the health and safety of oc- 
cupants of the premises and of other land in and adjacent to the Flood 
Plain Zone, and to insure conformity with the provisions hereof, which 
may include conditions as to: (i) placement of building or structure, (ii) 
type of foundation (such as posts with "blow-out" panels, (iii) elevation 
of floors, (iv) method of anchoring building to foundation, (v) design of 
drainage system (including private sewage disposal works), (vi) oc- 
cupancy of building, (vii) area and depth of any excavation or fill, and 
(viii) certification of performance by a licensed Massachusetts engineer. 

F. DETERMINATION OF LEVELS. 

1. For the purpose of this Section, the term "flood" refers to sea- 
sonal or periodic flooding of any premises within the Flood Plain Zone, 
and the term "high water levevl" refers to the level of water on any par- 
ticular premises during the maximum flood of reasonable expectancy. 

2. Where, in the opinion of the Board of Appeals, engineering 
studies are needed to determine the high water level on a particular 
premises and/or the effect of a proposed building structure or grading 
on the flood flow or flood storage, the Board may require the applicant 
to submit relevant data, prepared by a competent engineer selected by 
the Board of Appeals. 

3. The granting of any special permit by the Board of Appeals 
shall not constitute a representation by the Town of Cohasset or the 
Board of Appeals as to the safety of any building or structure, nor shall 
the establishment of the Flood Plain Zone hereunder constitute a represen- 
tation that all land outside of the Flood Plain Zone will be free from 
flooding. 

Section 2. Non-Conforming & Temporary Uses. 

A. BUILDINGS AND USES ALREADY IN EXISTENCE. 

Any lawful building or structure, or use of a building, structure or 
land, existing on the effective date of this By-Law or any amendment 
thereto which does not conform to the provisions thereof may be continued 
without expansion unless and until abandoned. A non-conforming use 
which has been discontuiued for more than three years shall be deemed 
to have been abandoned. 

B. CHANGE OF NON-CONFORMING USE 

The Board of Appeals may authorize by special permit a non-con- 

42 



forming use of a building, structure, or land, to be changed to a speciJSed 
use not substantially different in character or in its effect on the vicinity. 

C. EXTENSION OR ALTERATION OF NON-CONFORMING 
BUILDING OR USE. 

The Board of Appeals may authorize by special permit a non-con- 
forming use of a building, structure, or land to be extended or a non- 
conforming building to be structurally altered or enlarged, provided that 
such extension, alteration, or enlargement: (i) will not have a material 
adverse effect on the value of land and buildings in the neighborhood, 
or be detrimental to the normal use of adjacent property; and (ii) will not 
be injurious or dangerous to the public health, or hazardous because of 
traffic congestion or other reasons. 

D. RESTORATION OF NON-CONFORMING BUILDINGS 

A building or structure devoted to a non-conforming use (whether 
in whole or in part) and a building or structure non-conforming as to 
height, setback, yards or other provivsions, may, if damaged, destroyed or 
torn down, be repaired or reconstructed within the same portion of the 
lot and used as before, provided that such repair of reconstruction is sub- 
stantially completed within three years of the date of the damage, destruc- 
tion, or razing. 

E. TEMPORARY USES. 

In any district, the Board of Appeals may authorize by special per- 
mit a temporary building, structure or use not in conformity with the 
provisions of this By-Law, provided that such use will not be detrimental 
or injurious to persons, property or improvements in the vicinity and the 
Town. Such authorization shall not be for more than one year at a time 
nor be extended over more than a total of three years (whether or not 
consecutive). 

Section 3. Area Regulations. 

A. LOT SIZE AND COVERAGE REGULATIONS. 

1. Lot Area and Width in Residential Districts. 

In all Residence Districts, no building, except a one story building of 
accessory use, shall be constructed on a lot having less area, exclusive of 
any part of said lot below mean high water, than the "Required Lot 
Area," or having less width than the "Required Lot Width" specified in the 
following table for the district in which said lot is located, and no more 
than one building constructed as a dwelling, or so used, shall be located 
on each such lot: 



District 


Required 
Lot Area 


Required 
Lot Width 


Residence A 


12,000 sq. ft. 


100 ft. 


Residence B 


20,000 sq. ft. 


125 ft. 


Residence C 


30,000 sq. ft. 


150 ft. 



43 



Notwithstanding the foregoing, in a Residence C District, if (i) a 
lot contains an area exceeding 120,000 square feet (exclusive of any part 
of said lot below mean high water), or (ii) lots adjacent to one or more 
said lots are owned by the same owner or owners in an identical manner 
and contain an aggregate area exceeding 120,000 square feet (exclusive 
of any parts of said lots below mean high water), the requirement that 
each lot must contain at least 30,000 square feet is varied to the extent 
that so long as no lot or subdivided lot contains less than 20,000 square 
feet the lot or subdivided lot may contain less than 30,000 square feet if 
the average size of the areas of all of the lots contained in a subdivision 
plan of said lot, or of said adjacent lots, shall amount to at least 30,000 
square feet (exclusive of ways and roads). 

The width of a lot, as specified in this Section, is the shortest dis- 
tance between side lot lines measured through that part of the buUding 
nearest to the exterior line of the street (which is not a "side lot line") 
nearest to the building. For this purpose, the owner of a comer lot may 
elect either street line as a "side lot line." 

2. Lot Frontage in Residential Districts. 

No building, except a one-story building of accessory use, shall be 
constructed on a lot which does not front on at least one street for a 
distance of at least the "Required Lot Frontage" specified in the follow- 
ing table for the district in which said lot is located, or which has a width 
of less than said amount at any point between the frontage street and 
the nearest part of said building: 

Required 
District Lot Frontage 

Residence A 50 ft. 

Residence B 50 ft. 

Residence C 50 ft. 

3. Dwellings in Business Districts. 

In a Business District, no building shall be constructed as a dwelling, 
or so used, pursuant to a special permit issued in accordance with Section 
4C2 of this By-Law, on a lot having less lot area than the amount re- 
quired for its construction in the abutting Residence District (or, where 
more than one such district abuts, in the particular district nearest to the 
building in question). 

4. Exceptions for Existing Lots. 

Notwithstanding the lot size regulations hereof, a detached one- 
family dwelling or other lawful building may be constructed on a lot 
having less than the required area, width and/ or frontage (provided that 
all other provisions of this By-Law are compiled with) if such lot is 
exempted from such requirements by statute or if such lot on or before 
the effective date of the requirements in question: 

(a) Was lawfully laid out by plan or deed duly recorded in the Nor- 

44 



folk Registry of Deeds (or registered in Registry District of the Land 
Court), and was in conformity with the area, width and frontage pro- 
visions of the Zoning By-Law, if any, applicable at the time of such 
registration or recording to the construction of such a dwelling or other 
building on said lot; provided further, that on said effective date, said 
lot was held in ownership separate from that of adjoining land, or, if held 
in ownership the same as that of adjoining land, has an area of not less 
than: (i) 9,000 square feet if in a Residence A District, (ii) 15,000 square 
feet if in a Residence B. District, or (iii) 20,000 square feet if in a Resi- 
dence C District or 

(b) Was shown on a definitive subdivision plan duly approved by 
the Cohasset Planning Board, and was in conformity with the area, 
width and frontage provisions of the Zoning By-Law applicable, at the 
time of such approval to the construction of such a dwelling, or other 
building on said lot. 

For the purpose of this Section, the "effective date" of the lot size 
requirements established by the Zoning By-Law as first adopted, shall 
be July 1, 1955, and the "effective date" or any lot size requirements sub- 
sequently established (by amendment of the Zoning Map or of these regu- 
lations) shall be the date of notice of the hearing before the Planning 
Board on the amendment in question. 

5. Lot Coverage. 

In all districts, no building shall be constructed so as to cover, to- 
gether with any other buildings on the lot, a larger portion of the lot area 
than the "Permitted Lot Coverage" specified in the following table for 
the district in which said lot is located. 

Permitted 
District Lot Coverage 

Residence A, B and C 30% 

Business 80% 

Light Industry 50% 

B. SETBACK AND YARD REQUIREMENTS 

L Setback and Yards for Buildings. 

In all districts, no building shall be constructed so as to be nearer 
to the line of any street than the "Required Setback Distance," or nearer 
to the side lines of its lot than the "Required Side Yard Width," or nearer 
to the rear line of its lot than the "Required Rear Yard Depth", specified 
in the following table for the district in which said lot is located: 

District — Residence A 
Required Setback Distance — 20 ft. 

Required Side Yard Width 

15 ft., except that a portion of a main building not exceeding 15 ft. 

45 



in height may extend within 10 ft. of the side lines of its lot and an 
accessory building having a height less than 15 ft. and a setback of at 
least 75 ft. may be constructed within 3 ft. of the side lines of its lot. 

Required Rear Yard Depth 

15 ft., except that an accessory building having a height of less than 
1 5 ft. may be constructed within 3 ft. of the rear line of its lot. 

District — Residence B Residence C 

Required Setback Distance — 30 ft. 

Required Side Yard Width 

20 ft., except that a portion of a main building not exceeding 15 ft. 
in height may extend within 15 ft. of the side lines of its lot and an ac- 
cessory building having a height of less than 15 ft. and a setback of at 
least 100 ft. may be constructed within 6 ft. of the side lines of its lot. 

Required Rear Yard Depth 

30 ft., except that an accessory building having a height of less than 
15 ft. may be constructed within 6 ft. of the rear line of its lot. 

District — Business Light Industry 

Required Setback Distance — 

50 ft., except in case of accessory sign on Justice Gushing Highway, 30 feet. 

Required Side Yard Width 

10 ft., unless the wall adjoining a side lot line be either a party wall 
or, if adjoining another lot in the same district, a wall with its outer face 
coincident with said line, or unless the side yard abuts a railroad right- 
of-way, except 30 ft. if the side line of a lot in a Light Industry District 
is contiguous with a Residence District. 

Required Rear Yard Depth 

15 ft., unless the rear yard abuts a railroad right-of-way, except 30 
ft. if the rear line of a lot in a Light Industry District is contiguous with 
a Residence District. 



In addition to the foregoing, in a Residence A, B or C District no 
building shall be constructed so as to be nearer to any lot line that is not 
a side or rear line of the lot in question than fifteen (15) feet. 

2. Determination of Setback and Yards. 

For the purposes of this Section, the required setback distance shall 
be measured from the nearest exterior side line of the street in question; 
provided, however, that where the street has a right-of-way width of less 
than forty (40) feet, the setback distance shall be measured from a line on 
the lot twenty (20) feet from and parallel to the center line of said street. 
In the case of a corner lot, the lot line opposite the street along which 

46 



the required frontage is measured shall be deemed to be the rear line of 
the lot, and the lot line opposite the other street line shall be deemed to 
be a side line of the lot. 

3. Setback Exceptions. 

Notwithstanding the setback provisions hereof, a building may be 
constructed as near to the line of any street as the average of the setbacks 
of the dwellings or other main building nearest thereto on either side of 
the building in question. Where, in determining the average setback, the 
nearest main building on either side is more than two hundred (200) 
feet from the building in question, such side building shall not be counted, 
but instead the intervening space shall be considered as though occupied 
by a main building having the required setback (whether or not said space 
is laid out as a separate lot). 

4. Setback for Other uses. 

No open storage or display of goods, products, materials or equip- 
ment, no gasoline pump, vending machine or similar commercial device, 
no sign over one square foot in area, and, except for a flag, utility or 
lightpole, no other structure over five (5) feet in height shall be located 
nearer to the exterior line of any street than either fifteen (15) feet or the 
permitted setback distance for a building on the lot, whichever distance is 
lesser. 

5 Projections. 

Nothing herein shall prevent the projection of eaves, chimneys or 
cornices not exceeding eighteen (18) inches in width, or of uncovered 
steps, unroofed porches, window sills, or belt courses or open space. 

C. REDUCTION OF OCCUPIED LOTS. 

No lot on which a building is heretofore or hereafter placed in any dis- 
trict shall be reduced or changed in size or shape, nor the building moved or 
changed, so that the building or lot fails to comply with the lot area, front- 
age, coverage, setback, yard or other provisions of this By-Law applicable 
to said lot or to the construction or location of said building on said lot. 
This prohibition shall not apply, however, when a portion of a lot is 
taken or conveyed for a public purpose, nor shall this prohibition apply 
to the division of a lot on which more than one dwelling is placed at the 
effective date of this By-Law, so that one such dwelling is on each lot 
resulting from such division. 

D. OFF-STREET PARKING SPACES. 

1. Parking Requirements. 

In connection with the construction, establishment or increase by 
units or dimensions of buildings, structures and uses, there shall be pro- 
vided and maintained in all districts, improved off-street automobile park- 
ing spaces in the following amounts: 

(a) For family dwellings — one parking space for each dwelling 
unit. 

47 



(b) For all other places with sleeping accommodations, including 
convalescent and nursing homes, hospitals, sanitoriums, hotels and mo- 
tels — one parking space for each sleeping room for single or double 
occupancy or, where not divided into such rooms (as in a dormitory), 
one space for each two (2) beds. 

(c) For places of public assembly, including meeting halls, audi- 
toriums, libraries, museums, private clubs and lodges, funeral homes, 
restaurants and similar eating and drinking establishments, theaters, bowl- 
ing alleys and other amusements, bus depots and other passenger terminals 
— one parking space for each four (4) seats, or, where benches are used, 
one space for each eight (8) lineal feet of bench. Where no fixed seats are 
used (as in a museum or terminal) one parking space for each eighty (80) 
square feet of public floor area. 

(d) For offices, stores and other business establishments, including 
salesrooms and showrooms, consumer service establishments, public 
banks and other monetary institutions, and if located in a Business Dis- 
trict, including shops of the building trades, automobile service stations, 
and repair garages — one parking space for each one hundred (100) 
square feet of gross floor area on the ground floor plus one additional 
space for each five hundred (500) square feet of gross floor area on all 
other floors. (For the purposes of this Section, gross floor area means the 
total floor area contained within the exterior walls, including space used 
for heating and other utilities, and for accessory storage.) 

(e) For storage, manufacturing and industrial buildings, including 
warehouses, distribution plants, truck terminals, printing and publishing 
establishments, laboratories, power laundries, dry cleaning plants, manu- 
facturing and processing plants, and, if located in a Light Industry Dis- 
trict, including shops of the building trades, automobile service stations, 
and repair garages — one parking space for each five hundred (500) 
square feet of gross floor area on all floors. 

(f) For all other permitted or permissable uses, including nursery 
schools, animal or veterinary hospitals, golf courses, farm stands, drive^ 
ins, open-air storage yards, and open-air sales lots — sufficient parking 
spaces to accommodate under all normal conditions the cars of occupants, 
employees, members, customers, clients or visitors of the premises as 
the case may be. Such space shall be deemed inadequate if, when the 
off-street parking area is substantially full, there is frequent parking of 
such cars on the street near the premises in question. 

2. Mixed Uses. 

In the case of mixed uses the number of parking spaces required 
shall be calculated separately for each use as herein before set forth. 

Parking spaces for one use shall not be considered as providing the 
required parking facilities for any other use except as a special exception 
authorized by the Board of Appeals where it is clearly demonstrated that 
the need for parking occurs at different times. 

48 



3. Exceptions. 

Notwithstanding the other provisions of this Section: off-street park- 
ing spaces need not be provided in the following cases: 

(a) For detached dwellings in any district where the computed re- 
quirements is two (2) spaces or less. 

(b) For stores, offices and other lawful uses in the vicinity of the 
municipal parking lot located off Main Street in the Cohasset business 
center, provided that the walking distance between the nearest designated 
parking space in said lot and the main pedestrian entrance of the store, 
office or other use does not exceed five hundred (500) feet. 

4. Changes in Requirements. 

Whenever, after the date of the adoption of this By-Law, there is 
a change in the lawful use of the premises or in any unit of measurement 
specifi^ in any of the foregoing paragraphs of this Section, and when- 
ever such changes create a need for an increase or decrease of more than 
twenty-five (25) per cent of the number of off-street automobile parking 
spaces as determined by the provisions of this Section, more off-street 
parking spaces shall, and less spaces may, respectively, be provided within 
a reasonable time on the basis of the adjusted needs. 

5. Location and Design of Facilities. 

(a) Off-street parking spaces required here-under shall be provided 
either on the same lot or premises with the parking generator, or on any 
lot or premises associated therewith; provided, however, that the walking 
distance between the farthest designated parking space required hereunder 
and the main pedestrian entrance to the building or use in question shall 
not exced five hundred (500) feet, except that in 9ie case of parking spaces 
for employees only, the distance may be increased to one thousand 
(1000) feet. 

(b) A space of two hundred and fifty (250) square feet of appro- 
priate dimensions for the parking of an automobile (exclusive of access 
drives or aisles) shall be considered as one (1) parking space, which may 
be either open or enclosed. 

(c) Any off-street parking area located in a Residential District 
(whether herein required or voluntarily provided), containing five (5) or 
more parking spaces shall be placed at least twenty-five (25) feet from 
all street and lot lines and shall, if visible at normal eye level from any 
point on an abutting lot (if also in a Residence District) within fifty (50) 
feet of the lot line, be screened from such view by a dense evergreen 
planting, fence, or other suitable barrier. 

Section 4. Use Provisions. 

A. APPLICATION OF USE REGULATIONS. 

No building or structure shall be constructed, and no building, 
structure or land shall be used, in whole or in part, for any purpose 

49 



other than for one or more of the uses hereinafter set forth as permitted 
in the district in which such building, structure or land is located, or set 
forth as permissable by special permit in said district. 

B. RESIDENTIAL DISTRICT USES. 

1. Permitted Uses. 

In a Residence A, Residence B or Residence C District, the follow- 
ing uses are permitted as of right: 

(a) Detached one-family dwelling. 

(b) The conversion and/ or use of a one-family dwelling existing 
on January 5, 1956 as a dwelling for not more than (2) families, if located 
on a lot having an area at least one-third larger than the minimum 
herein required for the construction of a one-family dwelling in the same 
district. 

(c) Church or other place of worship, parish house, rectory or 
convent. 

(d) Religious, sectarian, or denominational educational purpose. 

(e) Public school or private school primarily offering general edu- 
cational courses. 

(f) Administrative, cultural, recreational, water supply, fire or police 
station or other protective use operated by the Town or other govern- 
mental agency. 

(g) Extension of an existing cemetery. 

(h) Farm, orchard, market garden, nursery or other productive 
agricultural use (but not including a salesroom or stand, nor, on a lot of 
less than five acres, any building devoted to productive agriculture use 
which, together with any other such buildings on the premises, covers 
more than five hundred (500) square feet or contains more than five 
thousand (5000) cubic feet, unless such salesroom, stand or building is 
authorized by the Board of Appeals as hereinafter provided). 

(i) Golf course, fishing or hunting grounds, reservations or wild- 
life preserve or a non-profit organization or membership club. 

(j) Customary accessory use incidental to a permitted main use, 
including the following: 

(1) The garaging or maintaining of not more than four (4) motor 
vehicles (including not more than one commercial vehicle) except in the 
case of a use operated by the Town or other governmental agency; pro- 
vided, however, that no premises in a Residential District (whether vacant 
or occupied by a building) shall be used for the regular open-air parking 
of more than one commercial vehicle. 

(2) Private guest house, greenhouse, stable, boat house, swimming 
pool, or other similar building or structure for domestic storage or use. 



50 



(3) The raising or keeping of animals, livestock or poultry as pets 
or for use by residents of the premises. 

(4) The renting of rooms or the furnishing of table board in a dwell- 
ing to not more than five (5) persons (whether regular or transient) other 
than members of the family. 

(5) The use of a portion of a dwelling or of a buildmg accessory 
thereto by a resident of the premises as an office, studio or workroom 
for the conduct of a profession or customary home occupation, subject 
to the conditions that: (i) not more than one person other than residents 
of the premises is regularly employed thereon in connection with such 
use, (ii) no stock in trade is regularly maintained except for products of 
the occupation itself, or for goods or materials customarily used incidental 
to its performance, (iii) such use does not produce noise or other effects 
observable at the lot lines in amounts exceeding those normal to residential 
property, (iv) no external change is made which alters the residential ap- 
pearance of the buildings on the premises, and (v) there is no exterior 
display or other outward evidence that the premises are being used for 
any purpose other than residential (except for an accessory sign as here- 
inafter permitted). 

In particular, uses permitted hereunder may include, but are not 
limited to, the office of a physician, dentist, lawyer, architect, engineer, 
real estate agent, the studio of an artist, musician or teacher, or the work- 
room of a dressmaker, milliner, hairdresser of handicrafter. 

(6) The use of a portion of a dwelling or of a building accessory 
thereto by resident builder, carpenter, painter, plumber, electrician, 
mason, sign painter or other artisan, or by a resident tree surgeon, land- 
scaper or fisherman for incidental work and storage in connection with 
his off-premises occupation, subject to the same conditions and limitations 
as are specified directly above for permitted customary home occupations. 
Provided, however, the prohibition against exterior display shall not be 
deemed to exclude the temporary or seasonal open-air storage of pleasure 
or fishing boats or of fishing and lobstering equipment owned and used by a 
resident of the premises. 

(k) Accessory signs, as follows: 

(1) In the case of a dwelling or use accessory thereto: one non- 
fluorescent, non-flashing sign not over two (2) square feet in area for each 
family residing on the premises, indicating the name or pertaining to the 
accessory use. 

(2) In the case of a permitted or authorized use other than a dwell- 
ing or use accessory thereto, or in the case of the sale or lease of the 
premises: two (2) non-fluorescent, non-flashing signs, each not over six 
(6) square feet in area, pertaining to such use, sale or lease. 

(3) The provisions of this paragraph (k) shall not apply to signs 
used exclusively for municipal, religious or charitable purposes. 

2. Additional Uses by Special Permit Only. 

51 



In a Residence A., Residence B. or Residence C. District, the Board 
of Appeals may, in a specific case, issue a special permit for any of the 
following additional uses, provided that the premises in question is 
reasonably adaptable to such use and will allow proper layout thereof 
(including adequate separation of buildings and open areas from adjacent 
premises), and provided further that the proposed use: (i) wiU not be in- 
jurious or dangerous to the public health, or hazardous because of traffic 
congestion, danger of fire, or other reasons, (ii) wiU not have a material 
adverse effect on the value of land and buildings in the neighborhood 
and (iii) will not produce noise, vibration, smoke, dust, odors, heat or 
glare observable at the lot lines in amounts clearly detrimental to the 
normal use of adjacent property; (iv) will impose no excessive demand on 
water supply, (v) will create no detrimental sewerage disposal problem. 

(a) The conversion and/ or use of a dwelling existing on January 
5, 1956, as a dwelling for occupancy, by more than two (2) families, if 
located on a lot having an area larger than the minimum herein required 
for the construction of a one-family dwelling in the same district by an 
additional four thousand (4000) square feet for each family in excess of 
one accommodated thereon; provided that no full-dwelling unit shall be 
located above the second floor. 

(b) Any public utility or communications use, or any use operated 
by the Town or other governmental agency not specifically set forth 
herein before. 

(c) Private club, lodge, or other non-profit social, cultural, civic 
or recreational use (but not including any use the chief activity of which 
is one customarily conducted as a business). 

(d) Convalescent or nursing home, hospital, sanitorium, philan- 
thropic or charitable institution (but not including any place requiring the 
restraint or detention of any of its occupants). 

(e) Funeral home or undertaking establishment. 

(f) Nursery school or other agency for the day care of children. 

(g) Boarding or lodging house for more than five (5) persons. 

(h) Commercial kennel, animal or veterinary hospital, if located on 
the same premises as a dwelling unit and conducted by a resident thereof. 

(i) Salesroom or stand for the sale of nursery, greenhouse, garden 
or other agricultural produce (including articles of home manufacture 
from such produce), but only where the major portion thereof is raised 
on the premises (or made from products so raised). 

(j) Antique shop in a dwelling or building accessory thereto. 

(k) On a lot less than five (5) acres, a building for productive 
agricultural use larger than hereinbefore specified. 

(I) Any of the following commercial recreational uses; recreation 
camp, fishing or hunting grounds, riding academy or stable. 

52 



(m) The garaging or maintaining of more than four (4) motor 
vehicles, or of more than one commercial vehicle, but only where in 
connection with a permitted main use on the same premises. 

C. BUSINESS DISTRICT USES. 

1. Permitted Uses. 

In a Business District, the following uses are permitted as of right: 

(a) Any of the uses permitted as of right in any Residence District 
except for dwellings. 

(b) Dwellings for occupancy by more than one family, including 
dwelling units in combination with stores or other permitted uses, if lo- 
cated on a lot having an area larger than the minimum herein required 
for the construction of a one-family dwelling in the same district by an 
additional four thousand (4000) square feet for each family in excess of 
one accommodated thereon, provided that no full dwellmg unit shaU be 
located above the second floor. 

(c) Any of the additional uses permissible on special permit in 
any Residence District (but without here requiring such special permit). 

(d) Store for the sale of goods at retail. 

(e) Business or professional office or agency, bank or other mon- 
etary institution. 

(f) Automobile parking lot. 

(g) Restaurant or similar place for the serving of food or beverages 
only to persons inside a completely enclosed building, with no mechanical 
or live entertainment regularly furnished unless authorized by the Board 
of Appeals, as hereinafter provided in Sec. C-2-(e). 

(h) Any of the following service establishments dealing directly 
with the consumer: barber or beauty shop, collection station for laundry 
or dry cleaning, dressmaking or millinery shop, hand or self-service 
laundry, household appliance repair shop, interior decorating studio, 
photographic studio, shoe or hat repair shop or tailor shop. 

(i) Salesroom for automobiles, boats, trailers, trucks or farm im- 
plements. 

(j) Showroom for building supplies (including plumbing, heating 
and ventilating equipment) with storage limited to floor samples only. 

(k) Shop of a builder, carpenter, cabinetmaker, caterer, electrician, 
mason, painter, paper hanger, plumber, job-printer, roofer, sign painter, 
tinsmith or upholsterer. 

(1) Any of the additional uses permissible on special permit in any 
Business District (but without here requiring such special permit) within 
the boundary lines of the lot where such use was lawfully existing on 
March 1, 1969. 

53 



(m) Customary accessory use incidental to a permitted main use, 
including such light manufacturing as is customary in connection there- 
with subject to the conditions that: (i) such manufacturing does not 
occupy an area exceeding fifty (50) percent of the total floor area oc- 
cupied by the main use, and (ii) that major portion of any products manu- 
factured aie to be sold at retail on the premises. 

(n) Accessory sign, as follows: 

(1) One non-flashing sign not over one hundred (100) square feet 
in area for each premises, if attached flat against the wall of a building. 

(2) Two other non-flashing signs aggregating not over forty (40) 
square feet in area for each two hundred (200) feet of lot frontage on the 
principal street, provided that a minimum of two (2) such signs shall be 
permitted on a lot having a frontage of less than two hundred feet. 

(3) The provisions of this paragraph (n) shall not apply to signs 
used exclusively for municipal, religious or charitable purposes. 

2. Additional Uses by Special Permit Only. 

In a Business District, the Board of Appeals may, in a specific case, 
issue a special permit for any of the following additional uses, provided 
that the proposed use: (i) will not be injurious or dangerous to the public 
health, or unduly hazardous because of trafiic congestion, danger of fire, 
or other reasons, (ii) will not have a material adverse effect on the use of 
land and buildings in the same district for local shopping or other per- 
mitted purposes, and (iii) will not produce noise, vibration, smoke, dust, 
odors, heat or glare observable at the lot lines in amounts clearly detri- 
mental to the normal use of adjacent property in the same district or of 
nearby property in a Residence District, (iv) will impose no excessive 
demand on water supply, (v) wiU create no detrimental sewerage disposal 
problem. 

(a) Dwellings, subject to the requirements of Section 3A3 of this 
By-Law. 

(b) Automobile service station or automobile repair garage. 

(c) Hotel or motel. 

(d) Theater, bowling alley or other indoor amusement. 

(e) The regular furnishing of entertainment at a restaurant or sim- 
ilar place. 

(f) Boat yard, open-air boat sales area, boat livery or marina. 

(g) Plant for dry cleaning, cold storage or freezing. 

(h) Any other business or service use similar to the uses specifically 
permitted or permissible in this District in function, general character, 
and effect on adjacent property (but not including any use first specifically 
listed herein by name as permitted or permissable on special authorization 
in a Light Industry District). 

54 



D. LIGHT INDUSTRY DISTRICT USES. 

1. Permitted Uses. 

In a Light Industry District, the following uses are permitted as 
of right: 

(a) Any of the uses permitted as of right in any Business District. 

(b) Printing or publishing establishment. 

(c) Power laimdry, dry cleaning plant, carpet or rug cleaning plant. 

(d) Plant for manufacturing and/or assembling of electrical or 
electronic devices, appliances, apparatus or supplies. 

(e) Plant for manufacturing of medical, dental, or drafting instru- 
ments, optical goods, watches or other precision instruments. 

(f) Plant for manufacturing of advertising displays, awnings or 
shades, bakery products, beverages (non-alcoholic) brushes, books, candy, 
clothing or other textile products, jewelry, ice, leather goods, toys or 
wood products. 

(g) Plant for bottling of beverages or packaging of food products 
but not including meat and fish products. 

(h) Plant for light metal fabrication or refinishing, but not includ- 
ing heavy punch presses or drop hammers unless authorized by the Board 
of Appeals subject to the provisions for authorizing other lawful uses in 
this District. 

(i) Research experimental or testing laboratory. 

(j) Storage yard, warehouse or distribution plant for: contractor's 
equipment and supplies, heating oil with above ground storage limited to 
ten thousand (10,000) gallons, fire wood, building materials, textiles, 
food products, household supplies and appliances, or any products of 
manufacturing activities permitted in this District (whether or not pro- 
duced on the premises.) 

(k) Commercial Kennel, animal or veterinary hospital. 

(1) Customary accessory use incidental to a permitted main use, in- 
cluding living quarters for necessary caretakers and watchmen. 

(m) Accesory sign, as follows: 

(1) One non-flashing sign not over one hundred (100) square feet in 
area for each premises, if attached flat against the wall of a building. 

(2) Two other non-flashing signs aggregating not over forty (40) 
square feet in area for each two hundred (200) feet of lot frontage on the 
principal street, provided that a minimum of two (2) such signs shall b© 
permitted on a lot having a frontage of less than two hundred (200) feet 

(3) The provisions of this paragraph (m) shall not apply to signs 
used exclusively for municipal, religious or charitable purposes. 

55 



(4) Such other signs as the Board of Appeals may, in a specific 
case, issue a special permit for, provided that conditions (i), (ii) and (iii) 
in the immediately following Paragraph entitled "Additional Uses by 
Special Permit" are satisfied. 

2. Additional Uses by Special Permit. 

In a Light Industry District, the Board of Appeals may, in a specific 
case, issue a special permit for any other lawful business, service, storage, 
distributive, industrial, manufacturing, or commercial recreational use, 
provided that the proposed use: (i) wiU not be hazardous to the vicinity 
through fire, explosion, emission of wastes or other dangers, (ii) will not 
have a material adverse effect on the use of land and buildings in the 
same district for industrial and other permitted purposes, and (iii) will 
not produce more noise, vibration, smoke, dust, odors, heat or ^are ob- 
servable at the lot lines than the minimum amount normally resulting 
from any of the uses specifically listed hereinbefore as permitted in the 
same District if located adjacent to said lines, (iv) will impose no excessive 
demand on water supply, (v) will create no detrimental sewerage disposal 
problem. 

E. EARTH REMOVAL. 

1. Permit Required. 

(a) No soil, loam, sand; gravel, stone or other earth materials shall 
be removed from any premises within the Town unless such removal v^l 
constitute an exempt operation as hereinafter provided or is done pur- 
suant to a special permit therefor issued by the Board of Appeals. 

(b) No permit for removal of earth materials (including temporary 
structures accessory thereto) shall be granted unless the Board finds that 
operations conducted under such permit, subject to the conditions im- 
posed thereby, will not be contrary to the best interests of the Town. For 
this purpose, an operation shall be considered contrary to the best interests 
of the Town which: (i) will be injurious or dangerous to the public health 
or safety, (ii) will produce noise, dust, or other effects observable at the lot 
lines in amounts seriously objectionable or detrimental to the normal use 
of adjacent property, (iii) will result in transportation of materials on ways 
giving access to the land in question which will cause undue injury to 
the roadway surfaces, (iv) will result in change in topography and cover 
which will be disadvantageous to the most appropriate use of the land on 
which the operation is conducted, or (v) will have a material adverse 
effect on the health or safety of persons living in the neighborhood or 
on the use of adjacent land. 

2. Application and Reference to Planning Board and Conservation 
Commission. 

Each application for a permit for earth material removal shall be 
accompanied by a plan, submitted in duplicate (the exact size and num- 
ber of copies of which may be indicated by rule of the Board of Appeals), 
prepared at the expense of the applicant by the Registered Land Surveyor 

56 



or Civil Engineer selected by the Board of Appeals, showing: (i) the 
existing contours of the land, (ii) the contours as proposed after comple- 
tion of the operation, (iii) the proposed lateral support to all adjacent 
property, (iv) the proposed drainage, (v) other information necessary to 
indicate the complete physical characteristics of the proposed operation. 

(b) Within ten (10) days after receipt of the plan, the Board of 
Appeals shall transmit a copy thereof to the Planning Board and Con- 
servation Commission which said Boards may, in their discretion, in- 
vestigate the case and report in writing their recommendations to the 
Board of Appeals. The Board of Appeals shall not take final action on 
such application until it has received a report thereon from the Planning 
Board and Conservation Commission, or until said Planning Board and 
Conservation Commission has allowed forty-five (45) days to elapse 
after receipt of such plan without submission of a report. 

3. Conditions of Permit. 

(a) In granting a permit hereunder, the Board of Appeals shall 
impose reasonable conditions specially designed to safeguard the neigh- 
borhood and the Town, which may include conditions as to: (i) method 
of removal, (ii) type and location of temporary structures, (iii) hours of 
operation, (iv) routes for transporting the material through the Town, 
(v) area and depth of excavation, (vi) distance of excavation to street and 
lot lines, (vii) steepness of slopes excavated, (viii) reestablishment of 
ground level and grades, (ix) provisions for temporary and permanent 
drainage, (x) disposition of boulders and tree stumps, and (xi) replace- 
ment of loam over the area of removal, and (xii) planting of the area to 
suitable cover, including trees. 

(b) No permit for removal of earth material shall be issued for 
a period of more than one (1) year in a Residence District or more than 
three (3) years in a Business or Light Industry District, although such a 
permit may be renewed for additional periods in the same manner as 
for initial issuance. Where the duration of the permit exceeds one (1) 
month, the Board shall require a bond or other security to insure compli- 
ance with its conditions of authorization, unless, in a particular case, it 
specifically finds that such security is not warranted and so states in its 
decision, giving the reasons for its finding. Where the duration of the per- 
mit is one (1) month or less, the Board may, in its discretion, require 
such security, as hereafter set forth for all special permits. 

4. Existing Operations. 

A sand or gravel pit, quarry or other removal activity in lawful 
ooeration on any premises on the effective date of this By-Law may con- 
tinue as an exempt operation rniless and until abandoned, or if operating 
under a prior permit issued by the Board of Appeals, until the expiration 
thereof. Discontinuance for more than twelve (12) consecutive months 
shall be deemed to constitute abandonment. However, unless specifically 
authorized by such prior permit or by a new permit issued hereunder: 
(i) the depth of the excavation shall not be increased below the grade of 
the lowest point excavated on the effective date of this By-Law, (ii) the 

57 



total area of excavation shall not be increased by more than fifty (50) 
percent over its area on said date, and (iii) the amount of material re- 
moved per day shall not exceed by more than fifty (50) percent the daily 
average for the twelve (12) months preceding said date (or the actual 
period of operation, it less than twelve months). 

5. Exempt Operations. 

The removal of earth material in any of the following operations 
shall be an exempt operation: 

(a) The removal of not more than ten (10) cubic yards of material 
in the aggregate in any year from any one premises. 

(b) The transfer of material from one part of a premises to another 
part of the same premises. 

(c) The removal of material from land in use by the Town or other 
governmental agency. 

(d) The removal of material necessarily excavated in connection 
with the lawful construction of a building or structure, provided that the 
quantity of material removed does not exceed that actually displaced by 
the portion of building, structure, driveway, sidewalk or path below 
finished grade. 

6. Permits in Proposed Subdivisions. 

The removal of earth materials from any parcel of land for which 
a preliminary or definitive subdivision plan has been prepared shaU be 
allowed only in the same manner as removal from other parcels of land 
in the Town. Consequently, tentative or final approval of a subdivision 
plan by the Planning Board shall not be construed as authorizing the re- 
moval of material from the premises, even though in connection with 
the construction of streets shown on the plan. For purposes of this Section 
4E the term "premises" shall have the meaning set forth in Section 9G 
and also shall include more than one lot if aU said lots are (i) adjacent to 
one or more said lots and (ii) ovmed by the same ovmer or owners in an 
identical manner. 

F. PROTECTION OF NATURAL FEATURES. 

1. Permit Required. 

For the purpose of protecting and preserving from despoliation the 
natural features and resources of the Town, no obstruction of streams or 
tidal rivers and no excavation and/or filling of any marsh, wetland, 
brook, pond or bog shall be done except pursuant to a special permit 
therefor issued by the Board of Appeals. No such permit shall be issued 
unless the Board finds that the proposed obstruction, excavation and/ or 
filling will not have a materially adverse effect on the aforesaid purpose. 

2. Reference to Planning Board and Conservation Commission. 

Within ten (10) days after receipt of the Application for such permit, 
the Board of Appeals shall transmit a copy thereof to the Planning Board 

58 



and Conservation Commission which may, in their discretion investigate 
the case and report in writing their recommendations to the Board of 
Appeals. The Board of Appeals shall not take final action on such ap- 
plication until it has received a report thereon from the Planning Board 
and the Conservation Commission, or until the Planning Board and Con- 
servation Commission has allowed ten (10) days to elapse after receipt 
of such application without submission of a report. 

G. SPECIAL PROVISIONS. 

1. Enclosure of Uses. 

(a) In a Business District, all uses permitted as of right or per- 
missible on special authorization, and all uses accessory thereto, shall be 
conducted within a completely enclosed building, except the following. 

(1) Uses permitted as or right or permissible on special authoriza- 
tion in any Residence District. 

(2) The dispensing of fuel and lubricants at an auto service station. 

(3) The dispensing of food, beverages or goods at a drive-in or stand. 

(4) Automobile parking lots. 

(5) Boat yard, open air boat sales area, boat livery or marina. 

(6) Exterior signs as herein permitted. 

(7) The open display or storage of goods, products, materials or 
equipment in connection with a main use conducted in completely en- 
closed building on the same premises, subject to the condition that no 
portion of the open use extends nearer to any street or lot line than the 
corresponding clear distance specified for buildings in the same District. 

(b) In a Light Industry District, aU uses permitted as of right or 
permissible on special authorization may be conducted within or without 
a completely enclosed building. 

2. Lights. 

In all Business Districts and Light Industry Districts, all lights and 
other sources of illumination (whether interior or exterior), and all in- 
tense light emanating from operations or equipment (such as from an 
acetylene torch) shall be shielded from direct view at normal eye level from 
streets and Residence Districts. 

3. Junk and Similar Used Materials. 

The open display or open storage of junk shall be prohibited in all 
districts, including but not limited to unregistered automobiles, worn out, 
cast off, or discarded articles and materials which are ready for destruc- 
tion or have been collected or stored for salvage or conversion to some 
other use. 

4. Trailers. 

No trailer or other vehicle designed or used for living purposes, 

59 



whether on wheels or otherwise, and including so-called "mobile homes," 
shall hereafter be allowed to remain in the Town for a total of more than 
thirty (30) days in any twelve month period except when stored but not 
used; provided, however, the Board of Appeals may permit such use as 
a temporary use for a longer period. No "trailer coach park," as defined 
in Chapter 140 of the General Laws, shall be permitted in the Town. 

Section 5. Execution and Enforcement. 

A EXECUTION. 

The Board of Selectmen or a Zoning Ofl&cer appointed by the Board 
of Selectmen to serve at their pleasure shall enforce the provisions of this 
By-Law as hereinafter provided. If a Zoning Officer is so appointed all 
action to be taken under Paragraphs A, B and sub-paragraphs 1, 2 and 
3 of Paragraph C of this Section 5 by the Selectmen shall instead be by 
the Zoning Officer. No buildings or structures shall be constructed, ex- 
ternally altered or changed in use in the Town without a permit from the 
Selectmen: and the Selectmen shall withhold such permit unless such 
construction, alteration or proposed use is in conformity with all of the 
provisions of this By-Law. Where a special permit from or exception by 
the Board of Appeals is required (pursuant to the provisions of this By- 
Law), or where an appeal or petition involving a variance is pending, the 
Selectmen shall issue no such permit except in accordance with the writ- 
ten decision of said Board. 

B. SPECIAL REFERENCE IN BUSINESS AND LIGHT INDUSTRY 
DISTRICTS. 

In a Business District and in a Light Industry District, each applica- 
tion for a permit for the construction of a building to be used for com- 
mercial or any other purposes not permitted in a Residence District, or 
for a permit to make exterior alterations in an existing building used or 
to be used for such purposes, shall be accompanied by a plan of said 
building, showing proposed front and side elevations. Said plans shall 
be transmitted forthwith by the Selectmen to the Planning Board, which 
said Board may report in writing to the Selectmen its findings as to the 
conformity of the building or alteration with the architectural character 
of the area, including its recommendations, if any, for increasing such 
conformity. No such building permit shall be issued until the Selectmen 
have received a report thereon from the Planning Board and transmitted 
same to the applicant, or until said Board has allowed thirty (30) days 
to elapse after receipt of such plans without submission of a report. 

C. ENFORCEMENT. 

1. If the Selectmen shall be informed or have reason to believe 
that any provision of this By-Law or any permit or decision thereunder 
has been, is being, or is about to be violated, they shall make or cause 
to be made an investigation of the facts, including the inspection of the 
premises where the violations may exist. Where written complaint is made 
to the Selectmen, they shall take their action upon such complaint within 

60 



fifteen (15) days of receipt thereof and shall report such action in writing 
to the complainant. 

2. If the Selectmen find no violation or prospective violation, any 
person aggrieved by their decision, or any ofiicer or Board of the Town, 
may within ten (10) days appeal to the Board of Appeals. 

3. If the Selectmen find a violation or prospective violation, they 
shall give immediate notice in writing to the owner and to the occupant 
of the premises and shall order him to cease and desist and refrain from 
such violation. Any person aggrieved by their decision, or any ofiicer or 
Board of the Town, may within ten (10) days appeal to the Board of 
Appeals. 

4. If, after such order, such violation continues and no appeal to 
the Board of Appeals is taken within ten (10) days, the Selectmen shall 
forthwith make application to the Superior Court for an injunction or 
order restraining the violation and shall take such other action as is neces- 
sary to enforce the provisions of this By-Law. 

5. If after action by the Selectmen, appeal is taken to the Board 
of Appeals, and, after a public hearing, the Board of Appeals finds that 
there has been a violation or prospective violation, the Selectmen shall 
issue an order to cease and desist and refrain from such violations unless 
such order has been previously issued under Section 5C3. If such viola- 
tion then continues, the Selectmen shall forthwith make application to the 
Superior Court for an injunction or order restraining the violation and 
shall take such other action as may be necessary to enforce this By-Law. 

6. Nothing herein shall preclude any officer or citizen from taking 
any other lawful action to prevent violation of this By-Law. 

Section 6. Board of Appeals. 

A. APPOINTMENT. 

There shall be a Board of Appeal of three (3) members and two (2) 
associate members, appointed by the Board of Selectmen as provided in 
Chapter 40A of the General Laws, as amended. Said Board shall have 
all the powers and duties of boards of appeals under said Chapter and in 
addition, all the powers and duties herein prescribed. 

B. APPEALS 

Appeals to the Board of Appeals may be taken by any person ag- 
grieved by reason of his inability to obtain a permit imder this By-Law, 
or may be taken by an officer or board of the Town or other person ag- 
grieved by an order or decision of any administrative official under this 
By-Law, including any decision regarding an alleged violation. In any 
case, no such appeal shall be heard by said Board unless, within ten (10) 
days after the refusal of a pennit or the issuance of the order or decision, 
said appeal is filed with the Town Clerk as hereinafter provided. 

C. SPECIAL PERMITS AND EXCEPTIONS 

Where a special permit or other exception may be authorized by the 

61 



Board of Appeals under this By-Law, the person desirhig such exception 
shall make written application therefor with said Board. Where, in the 
opinion of said Board, the Special permit or exception may be granted 
if accompanied by conditions specially designed to safeguard persons 
and property in the vicinity and the Town, it shall impose such conditions 
in writing and make them a part of its authorization. 

D. VARIANCES 

As provided by statute, the Board of Appeals may authorize with 
respect to a particular building or parcel of land a variance from any of 
the terms of this Zoning By-Law where, owing to conditions especially 
affecting said building or parcel, a literal enforcement of the provisions 
of this By-Law would involve substantial hardship, financial or otherwise, 
to the owner of said building or parcel and where desirable relief may be 
granted without substantial detriment to the public good and without sub- 
stantial derogation from the intent or purpose of such Zoning By-Law, 
but not otherwise. 

E. APPLICATION. 

Every application to the Board of Appeals for a special permit or 
variance, and every appeal from an order or decision of an administra- 
tive official hereunder, shall be filed in writing with Town Clerk, who 
shall transmit such application or such appeal to the Board of Appeals. 

F. PUBLIC NOTICE AND HEARING. 

Within thirty-five (35) days after receipt of any application for a 
special permit or variance or appeal from an order or decision, the Board 
of Appeals shall hold a public hearing on the application or appeal, render 
a decision and file a copy of the decision with the Town Clerk and the 
Board of Selectmen (or the Zoning Officer if one has been appointed) 
within twenty (20) days after the hearing. The Board of Appeals may 
make such rules and regulations as it deems necessary for a proper dis- 
position of such application and appeals, and shall see that adequate 
notice of any public hearing is given to the public, the Planning Board, the 
owners of all real estate within five hundred (500) feet in any direction 
from the property, who, in the opinion of the Board of Appeals, might 
be affected by their decision. 

Section 7. Appeal To Superior Court 

Any person aggrieved by a decision of the Board of Appeals, wheth- 
er or not previously a party to the proceedings, or any officer or board of 
the Town of Cohasset, may appeal to the Superior Court, provided that 
such appeal is filed in said Court within fifteen (15) days after such de- 
cision is recorded. 

Section 8. Amendments 

This By-Law or any part thereof may be modified or repealed as pro- 
vided by statute at a town meeting duly called, except that no proposed 
change in this Zoning By-Law shall be considered by the town meeting 

62 



within two years after the date of previous unfavorable action unless 
adoption of such proposed change is recommended by the Planning Board. 

Section 9. Definitions. 

For the purposes of this By-Law, the following terms, phrases, words 
and their derivations shall have the meaning given herein. When not in- 
consistent with the context, words used in the present tense include the 
future, words in the plural number include the singular number, and 
words in the singular number include the plural number. The word "shall" 
is always mandatory and not merely directory. 

A. BUILDING: Any structure, except a trailer or other vehicle, which 
is designed, built, or occupied as a shelter or roofed enclosure for persons, 
animals or property, or used for residential, business, mercantile, storage, 
commercial, industrial, institutional, assembly, educational or recreational 
purposes. 

B. CONSTRUCTED: The word "constructed" shall include the words 
"built", "erected", "altered", "enlarged", "moved" and "placed". 

C. DWELLING: A building designed or used as the living quarters for 
one or more families. 

D. FAMILY: One or more persons living and cooking together on the 
premises as a single housekeeping unit. 

E. IMPROVED: The word "improved" when used with respect to off- 
street open-air automobile parking spaces shall mean space treated with 
a surface binder, gravel, crushed stone, concrete or black top, or similar 
surfacing. 

F. LOT: A parcel of land occupied or capable or being occupied by 
one building, and the accessory buildings and uses customarily incident 
to it, including all open spaces (whether or not required by this By-Law). 

G. PREMISES: A lot, together with all buildings, structures and uses 
thereon (Except as provided in Section 4E6). 

H. STREET: The word "street" includes all public ways established or 
maintained under public authority, private ways open for public use or 
used in common by more than two owners, and private ways plotted or 
laid out for ultimate public use, or shown on a plan approved by the 
Planning Board (whether or not constructed). 

I. STRUCTURES: Anything constructed or erected which requires lo- 
cation on the ground, or attached to something having location on the 
ground, including signs, billboards, swimming pools, tanks and gasoline 
pumps. 

Section 10. Other Laws Not Repealed. 

Nothing contained in this By-Law shall be construed as repealing or 
modifying any other By-Law or regulation of the Town (except the 
Zoning By-Law for which this By-Law was substituted therefor), but 

63 



shall be in addition thereto; and if this By-Law imposes greater restrictions 
upon the construction or use of buildings, structures or premises than 
such other By-Laws or regulations, such greater restrictions shall prevail. 

Section 11. Invalidity. 

The invalidity of any section or provision of this By-Law, or of any 
boundary line or of any district or part thereof as laid down upon the Zon- 
ing Map or Flood Plan Map, shall not affect the validity of any other sec- 
tion or provision of the By-Law or of any boundary line, or of any other 
district or part thereof as laid down upon the Zoning Map or Flood Plain 
Map. 

Section 12. Effective Date. 

So much of this By-Law as is approved by the Attorney General 
shall take effect upon its publication as required by General Laws, Chap- 
ter 40, section 32, as amended. 



WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 3, 1969 

Checkers previously appointed for entrance by the Selectmen and 
sworn in by the Town Clerk, reported to work at 7:15 o'clock P.M. 

The Moderator opened the meeting at 8:25 P.M. The number of 
voters as checked on the incoming voting lists was 330. 

ARTICLE 7. VOTED by a hand vote YES 258 NO 30 that the 
Board of Selectmen, cooperating with the School Facilities Committee, be 
and hereby is authorized to acquire by purchase or eminent domain or 
otherwise for school purposes, land belonging to Cohasset Estates, Inc. 
situated off Sohier Street and shown on Town Plan 42 on file in the Town 
Clerk's ofl&ce consisting of 24.1 lii= acres; and land belonging to Walter 
K. Winchester situated off Sohier Street and shown on Town Plans 39, 
40 and 42 on file in the Town Clerk's office, consisting of 38.04it: acres; 
and land belonging to South Shore Playhouse Associates, Inc. set off 
Sohier Street and shown on Town Plans 39 and 40 on file in the Town 
Clerk's office, consisting of 9.46d= acres; that $135,000 is appropriated 
for such acquisition; that to raise this appropriation $4,000 is appro- 
priated from available cash in the treasury and the Treasurer with the 
approval of the Selectmen is authorized to borrow $131,000 under Chap- 
ter 44 of the General Laws as amended; and that $2,500 is appropriated 
from available cash in the treasury for necessary expenses relating to the 
acquisition of said land. 

ARTICLE 8. (Inserted by the Public Sewerage System Study 
Committee, Rene Chiasson, Chairman and others) 

I. To hear and act upon the report of the Public Sewerage System 
Committee and to see if the Town will vote: 

(a) to consider and act on the question of construction and operation 

64 



of all or any part of a system or systems of sewerage as provided in Chapter 
65 of the Acts of 1962. 

(b) to raise and/or appropriate a sum of $364,550.00 for any or 
all of said purposes and for construction and operation of all or any part 
of systems or sewage disposal as provided in said Chapter 65 of the Acts 
of 1962; determine how said money shall be raised, whether by transfer 
from available funds, taxation, by borrowing or otherwise 

(c) or what other or further action it will take relative thereto. 

II To see what action the Town will take with respect to authoriz- 
ing application for financial grants or assistance from the Federal Gov- 
ernment or the Commonwealth, either or both, towards the Town's cost 
of construction and operation of a system or systems of sewerage or 
sewage disposal; and vote or votes it will pass relative thereto, or act on 
anything relating thereto. 

VOTED by a voice vote that this Article be indefinitely postponed. 
At 10:20 P.M. a motion was made, seconded and so voted that this meet- 
ing be dissolved. 

ATTEST: 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHARLES A. MARKS, Town Qerk 

VITAL STATISTICS 

Records Of Births, Marriages And Deaths Recorded In 1969 

Births 

Total number of births recorded was one hundred twenty-three, of 
which thirty-four were delayed returns and corrections of past years. Of 
the eighty-nine bom in the year 1969 all the parents were residents of 
Cohasset. There were thirty-eight males and firty-one females. 

PARENTS, BE SURE TO RECORD THE BIRTH OF YOUR CHILD 
WITH GIVEN NAME IN FULL. 

"Parents within forty days after the birth of a child and every house- 
holder, within forty days after a birth in his house, shall cause notice 
thereof to be given to the Clerk of the Town where such child is bom." — 
General Laws, Chapter 46, Section 6. 

Many times returns are made by doctors and hospitals, before a 
child has been named. Make certain your child's name is recorded. 

Marriages 

Total number of marriages was ninety-four, including those where 
both parties were non-residents of Cohasset. Fifty-seven were solemnized 
in Cohasset during the current year. 

Deaths 

Total number of deaths was eighty-nine, including residents of 
Cohasset who died elsewhere and non-residents who died in Cohasset. Of 
the fifty-two who were residents of Cohasset, twenty-six were males and 
twenty-six were females. There were four delayed retums of deaths, three 
females and one male. 

65 



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78 



DEATHS FOR THE YEAR 1969 



Date 


Name 


Y. 


M. 


D 


January 










1 


Rose (Sanzo) Rosano 


86 


4 


10 


6 


LUlian C. (Kelly) Bean 


77 


7 


8 


13 


Beatrice Cowdrey 


81 


7 


24 


20 


Dorothy L. Watson 


60 








28 


Ellen P. Mattson 


84 


5 





February 










4 


Mary Catherine (Leonard) Dwyer 


66 


7 


28 


6 


Emma F. (McMinn) McFadden 


73 


11 


5 


8 


Joseph M. Barrow 


75 





2 


9 


Florence Kuchmeister 


82 


9 


3 


9 


Ellen Saunders 


45 


3 


16 


13 


Charles Joseph Deegan 


88 


3 


27 


16 


Baby Boy Powers 


1 


Day 9 hrs. 


26 min. 


17 


Gertrude Josephine (Campbell) Brady 


83 


4 





19 


Phillis M. Goff 


39 


3 


25 


26 


Nora (Moore) Powers 


83 








March 










2 


William S. Ramsland 


63 


2 


21 


4 


Lloyd Ganzell 


74 





11 


7 


Juanita (Jones) Oliver 


56 


3 


28 


13 


Mary O. (Landry) Sampson 


82 








14 


Thomas A. Metcalfe 


47 





21 


16 


Katherine (Miller) Seese 


83 


10 


7 


18 


Mary G. Manning 


84 


3 


6 


19 


Manuel F. Silvia 


48 


11 


25 


20 


Peter Joseph Doucette 


84 


10 





21 


John H. Meade 


76 


2 


24 


22 


Grace Abbadessa (Berte) 


69 








24 


Julia A. Ryan 


90 








26 


Philip L. Towle 


79 


11 


5 


April 










1 


John A. Gillis 


64 


4 


24 


1 


Harold N. Lincoln 


80 


9 


3 


4 


Thomas F. Grassie 


57 


11 


22 


12 


Edna (Webb) Wilson 


59 


1 


19 


25 


Henry H. Berlo 


81 


4 


15 


May 










1 


Anna (McKeefe) Halligan 


92 


7 


7 


7 


Theodore Lane Commoss Jr. 


61 


3 


11 


18 


Mae L. Jensen 


74 


10 


27 


21 


Mary M. (Kearney) Glynn 


78 





10 


22 


Susan Hayes Green 





1 


20 


24 


Walter Howard Enders 


64 


5 


17 



79 



DEATHS FOR THE YEAR 1969 



Date 



Name 



M. 



26 
29 

June 

2 
12 
17 
18 
19 
21 
28 
29 
30 

July 

1 

4 

6 

7 

9 
10 
16 
20 
23 
28 
31 

August 

5 

5 
12 
17 
26 

September 

4 

6 

7 
17 

October 

8 
11 
14 
22 
26 



Daniel Buckley 

Elsie T. Perry (Lindstrom) 



Catherine A. (Walsh) Morton 

Mary G. Murphy 

Roscoe Trueblood (Rev.) 

John C. Hitt 

WUliam Wall 

Julia (Sheehan) Hayes 

Louisa M. Hattin 

Beatrice (Way) Eddy 

Wilhelmina Lincoln (Davidson) 



James J. Shannon 

Martha (Bates) Philbrook 

Michael J. Pallamary 

Winifred Brown (Antoine) 

Robert V. Andrews 

Sarah F. MacLean (McNeil) 

Gladys Doane Salvador (Vickerey) 

Mary McGrath 

Joseph Manuel Silvia 

Gertrude Elizabeth Mahoney 

John Baptiste Piscopo 



Elfreda C. Samuels 
Charles I. MacLean 
Elizebeth Walker (Stone) 
Ralph Wood 
Adaline C. Remick 



Mary Marjorie Sullivan 
William W. Leavitt 
Miriam Crosby (Treat) Petersen 
Josephine Marguerite Waterman 



Peter O'Neil 

Leslie Norman Anderson 
Margaret Theresa Murray 
Helena Greenwood 
Marie Ix)uise Rattenbury 



73 


1 


18 


74 


10 


7 


84 


2 


19 


79 








68 


4 


2 


55 


2 


9 


73 


10 


7 


91 





30 


98 


10 


6 


84 


1 


16 


72 


7 


12 


88 








67 


5 


4 


80 








73 








40 


11 


2 


65 


3 


5 


64 


11 


12 


88 








91 


11 


6 


73 


4 


9 


91 


5 


17 


63 


1 


15 


38 


11 


27 


90 


8 


17 


65 


5 


19 


82 


11 


20 


41 


1 


3 


82 


11 


19 


92 


7 


1 


70 


10 


1 


52 


4 


27 


79 


5 


24 


78 


2 


17 


87 


7 


13 


68 


6 


23 



80 



DEATHS FOR THE YEAR 1969 



Date 



Name 



M. 



D 



15 


Gladys Prior 


17 


Meril A. Dorion 


21 


Lucey E. Treat 


22 


Randolph Hill Cook 


30 


George W. Saunders, Jr. 


December 




1 


Joseph J. Duwan 


4 


Catherine Mary Logan 


5 


Gerald M. McCarthy 


9 


Anne Broderick 


16 


Mary A. CuUen 


18 


Timothy J. Robinson 


20 


Elizabeth May (Witt) Stover 


30 


Antonio Sestito 


30 


George E. Michaud 



77 








81 








84 


11 


1 


63 


3 


20 


47 


9 


18 


76 








39 


8 


18 


38 


11 


27 


68 








73 


4 


1 








2 


59 


1 


22 


85 


7 


5 


71 


5 


11 



DEATHS NOT BEFORE REPORTED AND CORRECTIONS 



Date 



Name 



Y. 



M. 



1968 



June 
26 


I. Corrine Paul (Williamson) 


July 
28 


Baby Girl Pigott 


November 
8 


Mary F. Rooney 


December 
6 


John T. Maher 



61 


9 24 




20 Minutes 


65 


9 29 


43 


10 29 



81 



REPORT OF THE 
SOUTH SHORE MOSQUITO CONTROL PROJECT 

Submitted herewith is the report of the South Shore Mosquito Con- 
trol Project's activities for the year November 1, 1968 to October 31, 1969. 

The Project is a year round cooperative effort embracing the City 
of Quincy and Towns of Braintree, Cohasset, Duxbury, Hingham, Hull, 
Marshfield, Norvvell, Scituate and Weymouth, covering a total area of 
172.21 square miles serving a population in excess of 223,000. 

The Project is authorized and acts under provisions of Massachusetts 
General Laws, Chapter 252, Section 59, mosquito control provisions, and 
Chapter 112, Acts of 1931, pertaining to ditch maintenance of the salt 
marshes. 

The Project continued to base its program on three recommended 
and approved approaches to a community mosquito control: 

A. Mosquito source reduction 

B. Mosquito larval/pupal reduction 

C. Mosquito adult reduction 
giving priority in this order. 

A. Source Reduction — removing as much unnecessary standing 
water as possible, a requisite of mosquitoes in completing their breeding 
cycle. The Properly placed and maintained ditches on the coastal salt 
marshes, the cleaning of blocked brooks and streams wherever possible, 
the clearing of brush and growth along swamps and stream edges, the 
filling in of small wet areas and the leveling of ditch fill so as not to leave 
water pockets, these, if neglected would cause tidal and storm water to 
become brackish and stagnant to keep the mosquito population at its 
highest level. 

The Project this year added a second salt marsh machine, an Inter- 
national 500 diesel, wide gauge track clearance, wood cleat grouser 
mounted, crawler tractor with an International 3112 mounted backhoe 
and 22,000 lb. Gearmatic hydraulic winch. It is an excellent machine 
for marsh work, heavier duty, well balanced and more rapid in operating 
than any of our previous machines. 

In source reduction operation the following was accomplished in the 
Project area for this report period: 

62,130 sq. feet brushed 

13,940 cu. feet of new ditch dug 

381,463 cu. feet of ditch reclaimed 

4,075 feet of ditch cleaned 

B. Mosquito Larval and Pupal Reduction — Next to the reduction 
of the water source of mosquito breeding, larval and pupal control is the 

82 



most productive for the time and money spent, for in some instances one 
ounce of insecticide can treat up to two acres of mosquito breeding swamp. 

In mid-March, after checking many fresh water swamps for larval 
.counts of the early or spring brood mosquitoes, mapping is drawn out to 
indicate breeding areas. We contract both helicopter and fixed wing air- 
craft, whose pilots must work from these maps. They aerial spray only 
the breeding sites indicated on these maps. This operation keeps down 
what normally would be a large hatch of pesty mosquitoes that would 
plague us in the months of June and July. 

During the summer season we must check many and often breeding 
sites of other mosquito species: the salt marshes, catchbasins, coastal 
rockpools, tree holes, etc. Some of these must be sprayed as many as four 
times in a summer season, depending on the amount of rainfall. 

The Project has added a second catchbasin spray unit (a Jeep Uni- 
versal) for the treating of the many thousands of catchbasins in the Project. 
This unit enables us to keep up with the three or four mosquito hatches 
they might produce a season. 

The gallons of insecticide, the amount of sites and approximate num- 
ber of acres treated for mosquito larval and pupal control for this period: 

26,706 catchbasins sprayed with 1648.5 gallons of insecticide 

10,558 gallons and acres air sprayed 

4,032 gallons for larval control 

C. Mosquito Adult Reduction — shall always be necessary to some 
extent or form. In spite of all the pre-emergence control work there re- 
main many small unnatural water receptacles around the home capable 
of mosquito breeding. We just could not get to all. There are many con- 
struction projects under way that temporarily cause mosquito breeding, 
and we have many mosquito areas within but not under this Project's 
control we must contend with. 

We kept two mists blowers operating through last season. This 
applicator dispenses a fine particle insecticide on a high velocity wind 
stream thi-ough the air which acts as a fpace spray. The larger droplets 
are deposited upon foliage which act as a residue treatment. 

We have done some insecticidal fogging. This gives a longer range 
of space treatment but little, if any, residual action. 

Next year the Project should like to supplement their mist blowing 
operation with more insecticidal fogging. This Project plans the purchase 
of a new method fogger, it hopes will work well enough to cut back some 
on residue spray. 

The amounts of insecticide applied for adult mosquito control, with 
both mist blowers and foggers for this period: 



83 



10,229 gallons mist blown 

105 gallons fogged to 630 acres 

To ease the concern of some citizens within the Project's control in 
our handling of chemical insecticides, we use none of the persistent or 
cumulative insecticides: DDT, Dieldrin, Aldren, Endren, Heptochlor, etc. 

The insecticides used in this area for mosquito control have been 
accepted and approved by the Department of Public Health. The Project's 
personnel are all licensed by the Massachusetts Pesticide Board. We are 
constantly informed from the University of Massachusetts Extension 
Service on the latest development in insecticide formulation, their caution, 
their limits in toxicity and new application methods. We are in attendance 
at all sponsored training courses of the Communicable Disease Center, 
U.S.D.H. relating to mosquito control that are held in this area. We 
believe this is all necessary to give, not only a good mosquito control, 
but a safe control as weU. 

There are many man hours spent in this Project where no item of 
productivity can be shown yet are as necessary hours to the operation as 
any of the others recorded. The hours spent checking mosquito breeding 
sites and mapping these, inquiring into related mosquito complaints, the 
mixing of insecticides and loading of equipment sprayers, both repair and 
preventive maintenance of all trucks, tractors, trailers and sprayer equip- 
ment and the cleaning and painting of garage spaces. These tasks along 
with the regular mosquito control operations tend to keep a mosquito 
control man pretty busy fifty-two weeks a year on a project most people 
consider "just a summer job." 

The Project wishes to acknowledge the help received from officials 
and departments of the communities it serves and sincerely hopes that 
benefits derived bv these denartments as a result of this cooperation are 
as great as those derived by the project. 

REPORT OF COHASSET FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY 

Statement of Income and Expenditures for the Year 
Ending December 31, 1969 

Cash on Hand January 1, 1969 $1,297.58 



Income: 

Investments and Savings Bank Interest 1,833.83 

Benjamin Blake Bequest 237.07 
Dividend Holyoke Mutual Ins. Policy 

From Cohasset Savings Bank 51.60 

Underwood Account Withdrawn 1,462.27 



$3,584.77 $3,584.77 

$4,882.35 



84 



Expenditures: 




Safe Deposit Box 


6.00 


To Treasurer Paul Pratt Library 


2,450.00 


To Treasurer Paul Pratt Library 


1,575.00 


John H. Eddy Co. Insurance on Books 


342.00 



$4,373.00 $4,373.00 

Cash on Hand December 31, 1969 $509.35 

Schedule of Invested Funds 

and Savings Bank Accounts December 31, 1969 

Bonds (face value) 

Commonwealth Edison Co. 41/4 1988 $5,000.00 

Mountain States Tel Sc Tel 43/8 1988 4,000.00 

New York Central R. R. 5 2013 1,500.00 

Pacific Gas & Elec. Co. 41/2 1986 3,000.00 



Shares 

108 Shares First National Bank Boston 



$13,500.00 
Book Value $2,940.87 



33 Shares State St. Bank & Trust Co. 
Savings Banks 

Cohasset Savings Bank $9,372.23 

East Weymouth Savings Bank 4,146.00 

Hingham Institution for Savings 2,560.00 

Quincy Savings Bank 3,606.00 

New England Merchants Bank 300.00 



$19,984.23 
Respectfully submitted, 
LLOYD C. TROTT, Treasurer 

REPORT OF COMMITTEE TO STUDY TOWN BUILDINGS 

Members 

BRIAN WILKIN 

JAMES LITCHFIELD 

ORIN HUSTON 

LAWRENCE GATES (non-participating) 

Chairman 

PHILIP FACEY 

Established and instructed on 4-28-69 by Board of Selectmen. 
Meetings have been held as follows: 
May 1, 1969: Inspected Bates Building and Legion Hall. 

85 



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Transfer property to American Legion for minimum legal binder 
with clause disallowing any sale of property without approval of town. 
Building in poor repair. Removal not deemed advisable. 

If this is not acceptable, the building should be destroyed and meet- 
ing space be provided in another town building; i.e.. High School 
Auditorium. 

Fire Dept. 

Recommendation: 

Maintain present facilities for next 5 years. 

It is recognized that new and larger equipment will be requested 
and possibly approved in the next two years. At this time No. Cohasset 
and Beechwood Stations will become inadequate. 

Planning should begin now for a central facility to serve these areas 
and to accommodate the HiWay Dept, requirements alluded to in Item 2. 

Tree Dept. 

Recommendation : 

Abandon present accommodations as soon as it is legally permissible. 
Obtain temporary alternate housing; i.e.. Water Dept. JPumping Station 
for spray equipment. Old police garage for vehicle or continue to park 
vehicles at homes of employees. 

Include in central garage planning, paragraph 2. 

86 



Town HaU 

Recommendation: 

This is a low priority situation. Space is adequate. Prepare a 30 year 
requirement for office space. 

Provide funds to engage an architect to present proposal for optunum 
use of space based on long range requirements. 

Respectfully submitted, 

PHILIP G. FACEY, JR., Chairman 

REPORT OF THE SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 

I hearby submit my report as Sealer of Weights and Measures for 
the year ending December 31, 1969. 

A total of one hundred and forty five (145) weighing and/or measur- 
ing devices have been tested and sealed. Four (4) adjustments were made 
and one (1) measuring device was condemned. 

The amount of two hundred and twenty one dollars and sixty-five 
cents ($221.65) for sealing fees was collected and paid to the Town 
Treasurer, Cohasset, Massachusetts. 

Respectfully submitted/ 
BENJAMIN F. CURLEY, JR. 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 

REPORT OF THE PERSONNEL COMMITTEE 

The Committee met regularly at the Town Hall on the second Tues- 
day of each month, and more frequently during the monhs of January, 
November and December. 

Meetings, both formal and mformal, were held with the personnel 
of many departments, with the Advisory Committee and with the Board 
of Selectmen. 

The Personnel Committee was again appointed by the Selectmen to 
be the Bargaining Agent of the Town to bargain with the Town Employees 
who are organized for bargaining for wages and working conditions under 
the rules and regulations of the Commonwealth. 

The Consumer Price Index for the Boston Metropolitan Area was 
used to show the effect of inflation on the purchasing power of wages, and 
the Municipal Salary Survey of 186 Massachusetts Towns was used to 
compare the wages and fringe items of Cohasset with other towns. The 
Committee also made personal inquiries in neighboring towns concerning 
conditions of employment. This information was used to assist the Com- 
mittee to determine ih&k recommendations for the Town Warrant for 1970. 

Cohasset continues to rank high in comparison with other tovms of 
the state on all phases of employee compensation. 

The personnel of the Paul Pratt Memorial Library were included in 

87 



the recommendations of the Personnel Committee for the first time in 
1969. The personnel of the newly established Sewer Department were 
also included. 

We wish to express the thanks of the committee to all who have 
assisted us in our work of this year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

G. H. HOWKINS, Chakman 

REPORT OF THE COHASSET HOUSING AUTHORITY 

This Authority, legally constituted at a meeting held August 19th, 
1969 has met on a semi-monthly basis since that date and is pleased to 
report that substantial progress has been made in establishing a firm 
basis for continued activities. 

In addition to our regular meetings, joint meetings have been held 
with representatives of the Department of Community Affairs, Common- 
wealth of Massachusetts, as well as with representatives of the Depart- 
ment of Housing and Urban Development, Division of Housing Assist- 
ance of the Federal Government. These meetings, exploratory in nature, 
were held to assist us in determining the course of action to be pursued — 
(ie: State or Federal financing). We are pleased to note the interest of the 
Board of Selectmen indicated by attendance at one of the meetings with 
the representatives of the Federal Government. 

Site investigations have also been conducted with particular interest 
placed on Town owned properties as possible locations for projected 
construction. 

The Authority is now ready to move forward in the creation of 
housing for the elderly under a definite program of action. However, such 
action is dependent upon two factors: 

1. Acceptance by the Town of a Building Code at the annual Meeting 
in 1970 and, 

2. Continued cooperation from the Board of Selectmen in the develop- 
ment of a "Workable Program" a pre-requisite if we are to obtain 
funds necessary for development of this housing. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MARGARET A. LYNCH, Secretary 

SAMUEL HASSAN, Treasurer 

JAMES R. DiGIACOMO, Asst. Treasurer 

MARY JEANETTE MURRAY, Vice-Chairman 

W. CHESTER BROWNE, Chairman 



88 



REPORT OF THE CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

In 1969 the Conservation Commission continued its practice of 
having monthly meetings during which many subjects, both of a local 
and state-wide interest were brought up and discussed. Guests to our 
meetings included Mr. Harry Ritter, with whom shell fishing in Cohasset 
was reviewed and suggestions as to revisions in the Shellfish Law were 
recommended. Another guest Mr. Lawrence Lincoln, a Cohasset resident 
and Supervisor of the Cohasset State Park, (the old Annex Ammunition 
Depot), gave us an idea of the future plans the state has for developing 
the area. A number of meetings were devoted to compiling a list of sug- 
gestions which were forwarded to the Zoning Study Committee for inclu- 
sion in the new Zoning By-law. 

Preliminary work was started on the Natural Resource Inventory of 
the Town. Such an inventory and plan is now required for matching funds 
from the State for land acquisition. 

We have been concerned during the year that our Tree Warden, Mr. 
Howard Bates, was not able, due to illness, to provide the specialized 
knowledge and supervision necessary for the proper care of the Town 
Trees. We hope next year a qualified applicant will seek the position. 

Mr. Joe Becker is our Associate Member, representing the Cohasset 
Schools. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN BARRETT 

GEORGE W. BENEDICT 

HERBERT MARSH 

EDWARD WOODS 

JOHN BRYANT 

MARY JANE McARTHUR 

JOHN F. HUBBARD, Chairman 



REPORT OF THE RECREATION COMMISSION 

The Recreation Commission has now completed its 13th year of 
operation. We meet on the second Wednesday of every month at 7:30 p.m. 
at the Town Hall. Any resident of the Town is most welcome to attend 
and bring suggestions as to new recreational activities or improvements 
to existing programs. 

The Townspeople should realize that this Commission, a volunteer 
group, is handling details of finances, maintenance of recreational areas 
and operation of programs. The Commission needs the cooperation of 
the residents to support and work on recreational programs of their choice. 

During the past year the Tennis Courts at Milliken Field have been 
completely resurfaced. A new backstop has been installed at Barnes Field 
to replace the original one which was inadequate and in need of repair. 
About a year ago, at the suggestion of a Beechwood resident the Commis- 
sion set up a temporary skating area at the Beechwood Ball Field and 

89 



with the fine cooperation of the Fire Department had the area flooded. 
It worked out very well and will be continued each year. 

The Summer Recreational Program, for children ages 5-12, in its 
2nd year of operation, was far more successful than last year with an 
attendance more than double that of '68. The program operated for 9 
weeks at two fields each day, Barnes and Beechwood, from 9 a.m. to 
4 p.m. This was a change from the previous year when it was alternated 
from one field one week to the other field the following week. This appears 
to be a worthwhile program and will be continued. 

The Commission met, late Summer, with the Chairman of the Council 
on Ageing for a basic introduction to the aims and operation of the Council. 
The Commission intends to investigate how it can assist the Council in 
serving this age group in a broader area of activities. 

Plans for the coming year include major repairs to the bleachers and 
backstop at Beechwood, a new 4' chain link perimeter fence and 2 gates at 
Barnes Feld, continued investigation of the feasibility of lighting the tennis 
courts at Milliken Field and the possibility of lighting the Pond on the 
Common and Treats Pond on Atlantic Avenue for evening skating. 

During the latter part of the year Mr. Harold Barnes, a member of 
the Commission since 1957, submitted his resignation. He has served the 
Town faithfully and sincerely. His presence wiU be missed on the Com- 
mission. The Town will have a hard time finding one who will so faith- 
fully and conscientiously serve as Harold has for this length of time. 

The Commission wishes to thank all, whether Town official and/or 
resident, for their cooperation, understanding and assistance. Only by 
working together can progress be made. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HAMILTON T. TEWKSBURY, Chairman 
HAROLD F. BARNES 
NORMAN J. DELANEY 
DENNIS W. KUNTZ 
WILLIAM G. O'BRIEN 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE TO SURVEY THE 

ADMINISTRATION FUNCTIONS OF TOWN BOARDS AND 

DEPARTMENTS 

In accordance with the mandate of the town meeting on March 11, 
1969, this committee has concentrated its efforts on behalf of Public 
Works. 

At present, the hiring of a town engineer is economically not feasible. 
In an effort to coordinate similar duties now performed both collectively 
and separately, an article appears in the warrant creating a Board of 
Parks and Trees. This in essence places all "Greens" department under 
single rule. 

90 



Our thanks to the Board of Selectmen for their great deal of time 
and cooperation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

LOUIS N. SIMEONE, Chairman 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS 

After many hours of study and deliberation, your Board of Water 
Commissioners voted to proceed with plans to augment our water supply 
as outlined in the report by Sanitary Engineering Associated, Inc. of 
Boston. 

We have met several times with state oflBcials to negotiate an equitable 
arrangement whereby the use of 80 acres of land, controlled by the De- 
partment of Natural Resources, in the former Ammunition Depot, may 
be used by the Town for reservoir purposes. This land, in addition to 
approximately 30 acres, mostly Town owned, outside the State Park will 
create the proposed 110 acre reservoir. The project also includes a small 
control structure on Bound Brook near Beechwood Street and a new fil- 
tration plant near Lily Pond on King Street. 

It is our desire to proceed with this project as rapidly as financing 
will permit. We are convinced this wiU solve the water supply problem 
for many, many years. 

During the year the Water Department has operated efiBciently and 
is on a sound financial base. 

Again this year a record volume of water was treated and distributed, 
some 225 million gallons. An increase of 21 million gallons over last 
year, in spite of the curtailment during peak load periods. It is obvious 
that this rate of increased demand can no longer be met with our present 
facilities. 

Fifty three new accounts were activated this year, of which twenty 
two were installed by the Department, the remainder by private developers. 
This brings the total of active services to 1860, excluding all Town 
owned buildings and properties. Ten old services were renewed. 

Three hundred feet of 10" main and one additional hydrant was in- 
stalled to complete the line of Mill Lane. 

The pumping equipment at Station No. 6 at Lily Pond was replaced 
to update and insure our continued supply from Lily Pond to the treat- 
ment plant. 

The Board of Commissioners wish to take this opportunity to thank 
the various Town Officials, Department Heads and Committees for their 
splendid cooperation throughout the year. And to the Superintendent 

91 



and the Department Personnel for their willingness and diligence to get 
the job done, and at times, under most adverse conditions. 

Respectfully submitted, 

BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS 
ALAN S. MURPHY, Chairman 
ROCCO F. LAUGELLE 
HENRY W. AINSLIE, JR., Secretary 

REPORT OF THE BOARD OF SEWER COMMISSIONERS 

Your new Water Pollution Control Facility was put into operation 
on August 18th, 1969, to assure trouble free operation upon the opening 
of the High School September 3rd. 

It is our feeling this date marks a milestone in the progress of the 
Town to eliminate pollution of our harbor, James Brook, the center of 
Town area and conceivably many other problem sections of the com- 
munity, as well as eliminating the disposal problem at the High School 
complex. 

Many and varied problems have been encountered and overcome 
in the operation of this plant, but the greatest is yet to be solved, that is, 
the lack of raw material entering the plant. Your study Committee, hav- 
ing planned for the future, instructed the engineering firm to design these 
facilities to handle some eighty thousand (80,000) gallons per day. With 
the high school discharging less than ten thousand (10,000) gallons per 
day, we find this to be detrimental to the effective and efficient operation 
of the plant. 

Also, the operation of the plant has been handled, on a part time 
basis, by Water Department Personnel. We are convinced this is not the 
most satisfactory way to operate a facility of this type. In reviewing the 
overall picture we would recommend the following: 

1 . The employment of a full time operator of the facility. 

2. That proposed extension of the Sewage System be approved. 

3. Adoption of proposed Rules & Regulations pertaining to the in- 
stallation and maintenance of the Sanitary Sewer System. 

We vv^Guld like to take this opportunity to thank, the personnel of 
the Water Department who have operated this plant on their off duty time, 
our part-time Superintendent for his diligent efforts and the various Town 
Officials and Committees for their cooperation and assistance. 

Respectfully submitted, 

BOARD OF SEWER COMMISSIONERS 
ROCCO F. LAUGELLE, Chairman 
ALAN S. MURPHY, JR. 
HENRY W. AINSLIE, JR., Secretary 

92 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF REGISTRARS 

Number of registered voters on January 1, 1969 3824 

Removed from voting list because of removal to 

other towns, death and marriage 269 

3555 
.Added to voting list by registration, etc. 149 

Ti-ytal number of registered voters on January 1, 1970 3704 

EnroUed Totals 

Republicans 1376 

Democrats 866 

Unenrolled 1462 

Any resident not listed in the Census taken by the Board of Regis- 
trars during January and February should inform the Registrars before 
May 1st. 

Meetings for the registration of voters are held at stated times during 
the year. Notices of these meetings are posted in the Post Offices of the 
Town and in many other public buildings. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CLARENCE M. GRASSIE, Chairman 

REPORT OF THE BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

In submitting our report for the year, we do not attempt to list the 
amount of details which transpire in our office, but merely to set forth 
a few of the main aspects of the office. 

We wish to express our appreciation to the members of aU town de- 
partments for their cooperation and to all civic and voluntar}' groups who 
have participated on committees in an attempt to improve our town. 

There are many demands these days for changes, and it might be well 
to call your attention to those taking place in Cohasset. 

As a result of act'on taken at the last Town Meeting, Cohasset has an 
active Housing Authority making plans for low cost housing for the 
elderly. We also have a Council for the Aging which is trying to meet the 
present needs of these fine citizens. At the March Town Meeting there 
will be an article in the warrant to adopt a Building Code. This year at a 
Special Town Meeting we amended our Zoning By-Laws in an attempt 
to broaden our tax base. This year 1970 will be the town's Bicentennial 
Anniversary. The Bicentennial Committee should be highly commended 
for the planning of appropriate observances for this historical occasion 
for the ensuing year. 

We should make note of the generosity of our former Police Chief, 

93 



Hector J. Pelletier for the gift to the town of a parcel of land at the end 
of Sankey Road. 

We have filled in a large area of Woodside Cemetery, which we plan 
to loam and seed in 1970. This will make many more lots available in 
the years ahead. 

During the year we appointed a committee "To Make A Study Of 
Town Owned Buildings" which report is contained in the current Town 
Report. 

Respectfully submitted, 
ARTHUR L. CLARK, Chairman 

GEORGE w. McLaughlin 

HELEN E. SCRIPTURE 

REPORT OF THE HARBOR MASTER 

The year 1969 was very active as far as the boating population was 
concerned. It became necessary in July to request the Selectmen to freeze 
the waiting list and not accept any more applications until such time the 
present list is fulfilled. It is of the utmost importance that potential boat 
owners go through the proper channels to apply for a mooring space 
before they purchase a boat. The waiting list consists of three groups. 
Boats 16' and under, over 16' and up to 26' and 26' and over and is on 
a revolving basis and may be seen at the Harbor Master's office. 

There were two new floats added to the existing one which helped 
greatly to relieve the overtaxed one we had. 

By the end of 1970 each and every mooring will be tagged for 
identification purposes and location. 

It is with gratitude I express my sincere appreciation to the Harbor 
Study Committee, the Board of Selectmen and the many boat owners for 
the help and assistance in the last year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HARRY RITTER 

REPORT OF THE COHASSET COUNCIL ON AGING 

I am pleased to submit the first Annual Report of the Cohasset 
Council on Aging. It has been an exciting and challenging year. 

900 questionnaires were mailed to the residents of the town 60 years 
of age and over. As of January 6, 1970, 228 or 25% were returned. 

Subsequently, a daily phoning service for persons living alone has 
been initiated with the help of "FISH", a valuable volunteer organization. 
Visitations are also made to shut-ins. 

Through the generosity of Police Chief Feola an Information and 
Referral Service is in operation Monday and Thursday, 10 to 12 A.M. 
in the Conference Room of our Police Station. 

94 



The First Parish Church has made their facilities available to us for 
our Drop-in Center four days a week to be used for social, recreational 
and educational uses. Monday is Men's Day. Wednesday, Thursday and 
Friday is open to everyone all day. Volunteers are on duty 10 to 12 and 
2 to 4. 

Through the joint cooperation of the Social Service League and the 
Public Health Department, an Influenza Immunization Clinic was opened 
to our Senior Citizens. 

The Paul Pratt Library has made available a Large Print Book Col- 
lection and a Mobile Library. A Film Festival under our joint auspices 
is in the planning. 

The School Department has issued "Appreciation Passes" for ad- 
mittance to citizens 65 and over and printed a "Calendar of Events" 
which include sports, lectures and concerts. 

We have worked closely with all Town Departments, Churches, and 
volunteer organizations especially "FISH" and the Social Service League. 

In summary we are working to ascertain the total needs and desires 
of our Cohasset Senior Citizens and to provide the facilities, activities and 
social contacts to enrich their lives. 

I should like to extend my personal thanks, as well as that of the 
board for the courtesy, cooperation and support we have received when- 
ever we have approached the Town Officials and organizations for help 
in meeting the needs of the aged. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ARLENE CLINE (Mrs. Albert), Chairman 

MRS. RICHARDSON WHITE 

FRED DELLORFANO 

MRS. FRANCES ANTOINE 

ALBERT LFV^INGSTON 

THOMAS TWITCHELL 

MRS. VITO CONTE 

MRS. STEWART SANDERS 

REV. LEE RICHARDS 



REPORT 

OF 

GOVERNMENT ISLAND COMMITTEE 

1969 

The Government Island Committee is pleased to submit the follow- 
ing progress report for 1969. 

During the year some of the roadway within the Island property was 
blacktopped, thus enhancing and generally up-grading the interior of 
the site. This is all to the good because the area will doubtlessly be put 

95 



into extensive use this summer in conjunction with the water front activ- 
ities of the Bicentennial Celebration. 

The Committee recognizes the need for further extensive improve- 
men and believes a great deal can be accomplished at very reasonable 
cost, especially in terms of the tremendous potential of the area. The 
Committee recommends that it be continued. 

Respectfully submitted, 

RICHARD C. TOUSLEY, CHAIRMAN 
GERARD J. STANTON 
PRESCOTT T. CUMNER 
EDWARD FIGUERIDO 
MARY JANE E. McARTHUR 
HARRY H. RITTER 

REPORT OF THE BUILDING CODE COMMITTEE 

Report to the Selectmen January 26, 1970 

Herewith is a copy of the Proposed Building Code for the Town 
of Cohasset which has been corrected to date excepting for any possible 
revisions by Town Counsel. We are waiting for his review. 

In order to set up some guide lines for considering the workings of 
the proposed Code, we have studied the records of the Building Permits 
issued by the Selectmen over the past two years. We have attempted to 
evaluate the probable work load and operating costs of the proposed new 
department, and the probable revenue from Building Permits that could 
be applied to these costs. 

Below is a summary of the Permits issued during each month: 

Jan. Feb. Mar. Apr. May June July Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec. Total 

1968 — 3 1 2 11 13 8 23 9 12 15 13 6—116 

1969 — 4 12 11 9 11 4 5 15 9 14 9 — 103 

The largest numbers issued in any weekly periods were: 9 in each 
of two weeks of July 1968; 8 in one week of March 1969; 6 in each of 
two weeks of 1968; 5 in each of four weeks in both 1968 and 1969. Dur- 
ing the remaining weeks in both years the count ranged from 4 to none, 
with 2 or 3 each week predominating. The average over the whole two 
year period was just over 2 per week. 

Assuming that approximately these same figures wUl apply during 
the near future, we believe that a Building Inspector working 12 to 16 
hours per week could process applications, check plans, issue permits, 
and make about three inspection trips to each job during its construction. 
On the basis of an average of 110 permits per year, a 12 hour week would 
enable him to devote about 5 hours to each project with a little time left 
over for general office work. However, from the distribution of the work 
load indicated by the monthly and weekly summaries, there would be 
concentrations of work during some periods when 12 hours per week 

96 



would be inadequate. We think, therefore, that his time schedule should 
be somewhat flexible so that he could work longer hours when the neces- 
sity arose. An overall limit on this flexibility would need to be arrived at 
by experience but it seems probable that an overall maximum of 16 hours 
per week or about 800 hours a year would be a reasonable estimate. 

We believe that it should be possible to obtain the services of a 
qualified part time Building Inspector who might very well be a retired 
or partly retired engineer, architect, or builder. The services of such a 
person might be obtainable for about $5 per hour and on this basis we 
suggest the following budget for the department: 

Building Inspector's Salary $4,000.00 

Miscellaneous office expenses 1,000.00 



$5,000.00 



The building permits issued over the past two years brought in 
$1686.00 in 1968, and $1492 in 1969. On the basis of the fee schedule 
in the proposed new Building Code, these same permits would have 
brought in $2788 and $2610 respectively, or an average of about $2700 
for each year. 

We have analyzed the amounts of the estimated costs on which the 
permit fees for the past two years were based and, in quite a few cases, 
we have looked at the projects involved. We feel that most of the projects 
were undervalued by 1/3 to 1/2 and that if an experienced man were in 
charge of the permits he could require more realistic estimates. We think 
that the anticipated fees under the proposed new Code should amount to 
at least $1000 more per year than the 1968-1969 average, or approxi- 
mately $3700 to $3800. This would mean that the actual cost to the Town 
for the operation of the proposed Building Department might amount to 
about $1200 or $1300 per year. However, this estimate does not take 
into account the amounts now being realized for permits which now go 
into E & D account without discernible offsetting costs. 

We assume that the Article covering the Proposed Building Code 
in the Warrant will require the appropriation of funds, and that this ap- 
propriation would need to be for the full estimated amount of the budget 
since the fees for permits would go into the E & D account. If the Cod© 
is adopted in March, the budget for this year might be less because of 
the reduced time element, but there would be some non-recurring ex- 
penses for equipment, etc., which would offset part of this. 

Respectfully submitted, 

BUILDING CODE COMMITTEE 

EARLE W. HIGGINS, IR. 

IRWIN D. MATTHEW 

JOSEPH E. WOOD 

CHARLES T. PATROLTA, Chairman 

BY I. D. MATTHEW 

97 



REPORT OF THE SOCIAL SERVICE LEAGUE 

The staff of the Social Service League of Cohasset provided the fol- 
lowing Nursing and Physiotherapy service on orders from the patients' 
attending physician, and approval by the Welfare Department: 



Nursing Service 


Cases 


Home Visits 


Office 


Medicaid 


5 


198 


22 


Medicare B " 


8 


237 




Physiotherapy Service 








Medicaid 


1 


6 




Medicare B " 


2 


14 





The Social Service League is concerned by the more stringent in- 
terpretation of custodial and skilled nursing care which is contained in the 
latest directive from the Social Security Administration. It has necessitated 
carrying several patients, who had previously qualified for Medicare B, 
under straight Medicaid. 

As always, the Social Service League is grateful for the warm spirit 
of cooperation and interest which the Welfare Department accords our 
agency as we work together for the mutual benefit of our recipients. 
Casework Report 

12 cases, known to the Welfare Department have also been known 
to the Caseworker, Mrs. Wright, and 2 of these are still active. We re- 
ferred 3 cases to Miss Holub during 1969, and we are grateful to her 
for her immediate cooperation and help, in these as well as the other 
jointly handled cases. 

Respectfully submitted, 

(MRS.) MYRTLE E. MEDEIROS, R.N. 

Director Nursing Service 



REPORT OF THE MOTH SUPERINTENDENT 

The work on the Elm trees was late in starting this past year. The 
dormant spray was not applied early enough. The results are uncertain. 
Fifty-two samples were taken from different elm trees in various sections 
of Town and all came back with the Dutch Elm disease. The trees will be 
marked and will have to be taken down. A $6500.00 appropriation has 
been submitted to remove the diseased trees. This work will be let out to 
contract. Twenty-six elms were removed in 1969. 

Poison Ivy was sprayed in places where it was a problem on road- 
sides and backyards. 

The spraying of Elm trees at different stages will help control the 
disease but in many cases the roots are diseased and eventually the disease 
will spread through the tree. 

Respectfully submitted, 

LOUIS C. BAILEY, JR. 

98 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH 

Personnel 

ANTHONY W. VENTO, R.S. 
Health Agent, Milk Inspector, Inspector of Animals 

FREDDIE PETERSON, M.D. 

Pediatrician, Well Baby and Well Chid Conference 

MRS. M. MEDEIROS, R.N. 

Public Heath Nurse, Nursing services by Contract with the 

Social Service League 

CHARLES T. PATROLIA 

Plumbing Inspector 

EARL McARTHUR 

Plumbing Inspector 

This has been another year of little strife or turmoil for the Board of 
Health, thanks again to the efficiency and dedication of the real workers 
of the team, the agent and the public health nurses. The secretarial and 
office workers must also be given their share of the credit. 

There have been a minimum of complaints from the sewage disposal 
branch of operations, but we realize the number of complaints are not 
truly representative of the problems involved. Few people will call to com- 
plain that their own sewage disposal system is not working. 

We hope now, with the treatment plant in operation, the citizens will 
realize the more connections to the plant, the more efficient the operation. 

Realizing this, we are anticipating an affirmative vote on the sewer- 
age article at Town Meeting which is in the best interest of the public health 
of the town. ' "^ j 

We are looking forward to much improvement at the town disposal 
area, with more cooperation from the highway department and its equip- 
ment, which is more than welcomed. 

Once again, we the Board, are grateful to aU who have helped us 
throughout the year. 

Sewage Disposal Pennits 

New construction approved 
Alterations & additions 
Subdivision Investigations 
Final Inspections 
Percolation tests witnessed 
Short form permits issued 

Total 124 

There were fifteen dye tests conducted of which seven were positive 

Food Handling Establishments 

Year round restaurants 1 1 Milk Samples 1 

99 





Nuisance Complaints 




50 


Sewage overflow 


62 


31 


Drainage surface water 


4 


4 


Animals 


36 


90 


Rubbish & Garbage 


8 


69 


Drinking Water 


1 


42 


Miscellaneous 


13 



Seasonal restaurants 
Grocery stores 
Water Samples 



6 Swab tests 
6 Milk & Oieo Licenses 
15 Total inspections 

Other Health Agent Activities 



Inspections of Day Care Centers, Day Camps, Nursing Homes 

Burial Permits Issued 

Licenses and Permits Issued 

International Immunization Certificates 

Anti Rabies Clinic Inoculations 

Influenza vaccine clinic, 23 town employees, senior citizens 44 

Court Appearances for town 

Dead animals to laboratory for test to determine presence of rabies 



58 
36 
79 



7 

54 

78 

157 

128 

67 

4 

3 



Receipts to Town Treasurer 



Registered Plumbers 
Permits, new construction 
Permits, alterations 



Plumbing Inspections 

73 Permit Fee collected 
44 Fee Payment to 
41 Inspectors 



$644.50 



$508.00 
$464.00 



Immunization Summary 



DPT 


DT Smallpox 


Heaf Tuberculin 


Mumps 


Grade 1 47 


46 




79 




Grade 4 






129 




Grade 5 


64 








Grade 6 


101 








Grade 9 


83 




116 




Grade 12 


55 




85 




Grade K to 8 received 


Mumps vaccine 






622 


Total 47 


147 202 
WeU Child Clinic 




409 


622 


Oral Trivalent Polio 


32 Tine Tuberculine 




1 


Measles vaccine 


3 Mumps vaccine 




26 


Smallpox Vaccination 


5 German Measle Vaccine 


2 


D.P.T. 


23 









Heaf Tuberculine Test 



Active 
Arrested cases 



Detection Programs 

409 Tine Tuberculine Test 

Tuberculosis Status 

Cases under supervision 
4 Visits of supervision 

Public Health Nursing 

(by contract with Social Service League) 
Mrs. M. Medeiros, R.N. 



33 
47 



100 



Antepartum 


6 


Postpartum 


77 


Health Promotion 




Premature 


5 


Under 28 days 


34 


28 days - 1 year 


55 


1-4 years 


119 


5-19 years 


18 


Disease Control 




Cancer 


3 


Cardiac 


8 


Diabetic 


2 


Communicable 


44 


Handicapped Children 


10 


(Mental, Physical) 





Maternity Cases Visits 

22 
115 



5 

37 

97 

212 

29 



31 
39 
6 
46 
23 

There were six premature births reported to the Board of Health. One 
deceased. 

Communicable diseases reported 

Chicken Pox 4 Hepatitis 1 

German Measles 1 Mumps 2 

Scarlet Fever 1 Dog Bites 24 

Septic Sore Throat 27 Racoon Bites 4 

Salmonella 1 Gonorrhea 1 

Well Child Conferences 

Sessions Attendance 

Well Baby, WeU Child Clinics 10 144 

The Well Child Clinics showed a 21% increase in the number of 
children served, with 144 attending 10 clinics. Once again preschool 
physicals (19) were given. This year Mumps vaccine, and late in No- 
vember, German Measles vaccine was made available to our clinics. 

We are grateful as always for the loyal support and cooperation of 
the Board of Health, and of Mr. Vento, the Health Agent, as we work 
ft together to safeguard and promote good health in the community. 

^K Casework Report 

^B Four cases were carried over from 1968 and three of these are still 
^■receiving intensive treatment; one for personal adjustment and economic 
^■stress, another for difficult parent-child relationships, and the third for 
^■medical and economic problems. 

^r In addition four other cases were opened during the year. Three in- 
volved medical financial problems, and the fourth was a young woman 

101 



with many emotional and economical stresses. Four of the total eight cases 
are still receiving active treatment. 

Respectfully submitted, 

EDWARD A. McCarthy, m.d. 

Chairman 

RENE G. CHIASSON, Secretary 

WILLIAM J. MONTUORI, Member 

REPORT OF THE TOWN TREASURER 
JANUARY 1, 1969 to DECEMBER 31, 1969 

BALANCE IN TREASURY — JANUARY 1, 1969 $ 288,325.87 

Received from Collector of Taxes 2,700,447.35 

Received from Town Collector 124,719.23 

Received from other Sources 2,924,944.46 



$6,038,436.91 
Paid Selectmen's Warrants No. 1 - 145 Inc. — 5,736,856.77 



BALANCEINTREASURY — DECEMBER 31, 1969 $ 301,580.14 



Rockland Trust Company $ 45,664.29 

Rockland Trust Company (Deposit in Transit) 28,653.59 

South Shore National Bank 156,724.14 

State Street Bank and Trust Company 24,1 18.77 

New England Merchants National Bank 886.71 

Boston Safe Deposit and Trust Company 20,244.30 

Norfolk County Trust Company 24,746.23 

First National Bank in Boston 442.11 

Cash in Drawer 100.00 



$ 301,580.14 



Respectfully submitted, 
DAVID E. TRUESDELL 

REPORT OF THE HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT 

Submitted herewith is the report of the Highway Surveyor for the 
year ending December 31, 1969. 

The men of the Highway Department had a good year. The spring 
cleaning was done early. Streets swept, catch basins cleared. This was 
done with Town owned equipment, a great help and saving. Street lines 
were painted, street signs and fences were painted and repaired. 

Street signs and street markers are still a problem. It is a full time 
job for one man. 

102 



The Department worked on street drainage in different sections of 
Town. This work will continue. It is the first step to good roads. 

The Department installed 17 Standard Catch Basins and laid 2360' 
of 10" and 12" and 15" pipe. One and one half miles of Mix in Place was 
laid on various streets and private ways. One and one half mUes of Type 
I Bituminous Concrete was put down on three different streets. This pro- 
gram wUl continue. 

Chapter 90 Maintenance and Construction Funds were applied for 
this year. The Construction funds will be used on Elm Street. The Main- 
tenance funds will be used on Jerusalem Road to install a culvert and 
necessary drainage and to continue with the resurfacing. 

The construction work on Elm Street could be delayed by the Bi- 
centennial plans for the coming year. 

The State will look into the situation at the Cove, regarding the 
tidal gate. Maybe the Construction funds for 1970 and 1971 could be 
used to help the flooding condition that exists. 

The work on Forest Avenue and South Main Street should be com- 
pleted this year. There is money set aside for this work. This year the De- 
partment has four routine articles. It is the first time in fourteen years 
that there has not been a request for special street or drainage articles. 
There is enough money to complete this year's work schedule. 

The Department has requested a new dump truck to replace the 
ten year old one now in use. The new Backhoe and Front end loader have 
worked very weU. 

This year the Department has offered the Board of Health a man to 
work at the Town Dump, also the use of Highway Dept. Trucks and 
equipment to try and put things together and save the Town some money. 

In closing, I thank the men of the Department and the Town Officials 
who have helped throughout the year. I thank you, John F. James, who 
at the age of seventy wUl retire from regular Highway duties. Your time 
and loyalty have been greatly appreciated. 

Respectfully submitted, 

LOUIS C. BAILEY, JR., Highway Surveyor 

REPORT OF THE COLLECTOR OF TAXES 

January 1, 1969 to December 31, 1969 

1966 

Outstanding January 1, 1969 170.78 

Collected and Paid to Treasurer 51.85 

Outstanding December 31, 1969 118.93 



170.78 



1967 

Outstanding January 1, 1969 8,830.56 

103 



Collected and Paid to Treasurer 


5,281.91 




Abated 291.70 






Refunds on abatements 191.82 


99.88 
3,169.42 




Tax Titles 




Outstanding December 31, 1969 


279.35 








8,830.56 


1968 




Outstanding January 1, 1969 




72,401.33 


Add: New Committments 


65,708.81 


11,252.79 


Collected and Paid to Treasurer 


83,654.12 


Abated 4,456.42 






Refunds on abatements 2,317.79 


2,138.63 




Tax Titles 


5,280.60 




Tax Judgement 


46.76 




Outstanding December 31, 1969 


10,480.32 








83,654.12 


1969 




Total Committments of Warrants from the Assessors of 




Personal Property, Real Estate, and Motor Vehicle Excise: 








2,668,125.42 


Collected and Paid to Treasurer 


2,469,999.82 




Abated 99,310.21 






Refunds on Abatements 17,397.11 


81,913.10 




Tax Titles 


10,321.69 




Outstanding December 31, 1969 


105,890.81 
)LLECTOR 


2,668,125.42 


REPORT OF THE WATER C( 




December 31, 1969 






1967 Water Liens 






Outstanding January 1, 1966 




201.33 


Collected and Paid to Treasurer 


142.71 




Tax Titles 


58.62 


201.33 


1968 Water Liens 




Outstanding January 1, 1969 




1,317.27 


Collected and Paid to Treasurer 


1,215.47 




Ixss: Refunds 44.32 


44.32 




Tax Titles 


74.12 




Outstanding December 31, 1969 


72.00 








1,317.27 


1969 Water Liens 




Total Committment of Warrant 




8,792.55 


Collected and Paid to Treasurer 


7,363.34 




Less: Refunds 25.00 


25.00 




Tax Titles 


150.58 





104 



Outstanding December 31, 1969 



1,303.63 



8,792.55 



1968 Water Meters, etc. 



Outstanding January 1, 1969 



REPORT OF THE TOWN COLLECTOR 
December 31, 1969 



Accounts Receivable Collected 

Town Hall Rents 

Wire Dept. 

Police & Fire 

Cemetery Sales 

School Dept. 

Misc. Income 



400.00 
114.80 
358.07 
8,818.00 
726.19 
114,302.17 



21,575.65 



Collected and Paid to Treasurer 

Abated 

Refunds on abatements 


40.70 
12.09 


12,754.49 

28.61 

8,792.55 




Transfer to 1969 Water Liens 


Water Meters, 

419.01 
610.67 






etc. 

133,847.39 

191.66 
21,626.61 


21,575.65 


1969 

Total Committment of Warrant 

Collected and Paid to Treasurer 

Abated 

Refunds 

Outstanding, December 31, 1969 


155,282.34 
155,282.34 



124,719.23 



124,719.23 



TOTAL COLLECTIONS SUMMARY 



Taxes Collected 

Water Collections 

Accounts Receivable 

Interest 

Lein Certificates 

Water Leins 



2,541,042.39 

146,601.88 

124,719.23 

3,700.38 

381.18 

8,721.52 



Total 



2,825,166.58 



Respectfully Submitted, 
Gordon E. Flint 
Town Collector 



105 



REPORT OF THE POLICE DEPARTMENT 

1. As directed by the By-Laws of the Town of Cohasset, Article 3, 

Section 3, I herewith submit my report for the Cohasset Police Depart- 
ment for the year ending December 31, 1969. 

ARREST REPORT 

Males Females Total 

Abandoning a motor vehicle 1 1 

Altered license in possession 1 1 2 

Assault and battery 2 2 

Assault and battery upon a police officer 1 1 

Breaking and entering, daytime 1 1 

Breaking and entering, nighttime 14 1 15 

Default 3 3 

Disturbing the peace 2 1 3 

Drunkenness 67 8 75 

Failing to keep right 27 1 28 

Failing to obey traffic sign 8 8 

Failing to obey traffic signal 4 4 

Having narcotic drug in possession 2 2 

Illegal possession of fireworks 1 1 

Knowingly present where narcotic drug is found 2 2 

Larceny 6 6 

Leaving scene of accident, personal injury .... 1 1 

Leaving scene of accident, property damage ... 2 2 

Loitering, violation of town by-law 1 1 

Minor in possession of alcohol 4 4 

Neglect to support family 1 1 

Neglect to support wife 1 1 

No inspection sticker on motor vehicle 7 7 

No license in pK>ssession 12 12 

No registration in possession 6 6 

No taillight on vehicle 4 4 

Not properly licensed 1 1 

Operating motor vehicle after 1 A.M. on junior 

license 1 1 

Operating motor vehicle after right to operate 

suspended 1 1 

Operating a motor vehicle to endanger 5 1 6 

Operating a motor vehicle while under the in- 
fluence of amphetimines 1 1 

Operating a motor veh^'cle while under the in- 
fluence of intoxicating liquor 21 4 25 

Operating uninsured motor vehicle 1 1 

Operatine unregistered motor vehicle 1 1 

Operatinjy motor vehicle without a license .... 1 1 

Operating a motor vehicle recklessly 1 1 

Procuring alcoholic beverage for minor 1 1 

Receiving stolen property 2 2 

105 



Possession of burglarious implements 4 2 

Refusing to stop for police officer 2 2 

^Refusing to show registration 1 1 

Speeding 80 8 88 

Unlawful appropriation of a boat 2 2 

Unnatural act 1 1 

Using a motor vehicle in commission of a felony 1 1 

Using motor vehicle without authority 9 1 10 

Using motor vehicle without authority after li- 
cense suspended 1 1 

Total 318 27 345 
DISPOSITION OF CASES 

Arrested on warrant 8 

Arrested without warrant 103 

Summoned by Court 137 

Released, Chapter 272, Section 45, Gen. Laws 30 

GuHty 208 

Not Guilty 19 

Continued 20 

Filed by order of the Court 8 

Dismissed 21 

Appealed to Superior Court 6 

Held for Grand Jury 6 

Arrested for other departments 7 

Total fines $4,640.00 

SUMMARY OF WORK DONE BY THE DEPARTMENT 

Accidents investigated, automobile 185 

Buildings found open and locked by the police 233 

Complaints received at Headquarters and 

investigated by this Department 4,524 

Duty calls from boxes 3,510 

Fire alarms answered 58 

Firearms Identification Cards issued 92 

Hackney licenses issued 2 

Hackney operator licenses issued 8 

Mileage of patrol cars 94,857 

Mileage of ambulance 5,780 

Number of doors on business establishments 

tried nightly 276 

Number of gasoline pumps checked nightly 37 

Number of days spent in Court by officers 476 

Oxygen caUs 10 

Parking permits issued to Cohasset residents for 

parking area at Sandy Beach 2,450 

Licenses to carry firearms issued 82 

Firearms dealer licenses issued 2 

Permits to perform work on Lord's Day issued 20 

107 



Persons transported to hospitals and doctor's olBQces 

in ambulance 158 

in police cars 53 

Special attention requested by owners of closed houses 480 

Street lights reported out to Brockton Edison Company 255 

Special police details 935 

Summonses served for other departments 234 

Stolen property recovered by departments, value $2,460.00 

Violation citations issued, Chapter 90C 343 

Temporary guest permits issued for parking area at 

Sandy Beach 346 

Tags issued for parking violations 627 

The past year has been a busy one. The demands on officers of the 
Department were met in a manner v/orthy of the thanks of the citizens. 
There is a great lack of interest on the part of young male residents in 
Cohasset in police work. This is borne out by the few taking the entrance 
examinations when they are scheduled. I hope that in the future police 
work will offer an attraction to the youth of Cohasset. 

This year we are turning in two Ford sedan patrol cars for two 
station wagons equipped for emergencies such as accidents. I believe this 
will greatly help in quick response to such emergencies. 

In closing I want to thank all for the cooperation received during 
the past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

RANDOLPH A. FEOLA 

Chief of Police 
Cohasset, Massachusetts 

REPORT OF THE BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

Our 1969 financial report is as follows: 
Total Valuation, 1968 19,258,667.63 



Total Valuation, 1969 


20,068,792.63 




Plus Omitted Assessment 


9,675.00 


20,078,467.63 








Increase in Valuation 


819,800.00 


Town Grant, Annual Town Meeting, 






March 1, 1969 




3,126,833.73 


Amounts required to be raised: 






School Lunch 


8,887.34 




Free Public Libraries 


1,460.00 




Racial Imbalance Program 


3,780.00 


14,127.34 


County Tax and Assessments 






County Tax 


73,160.63 




County Hospital 


4,032.63 


77,193.26 


State Tax and Assessments 






State Recreation Areas 


12,917.38 




Metropolitan Parks 


1,823.00 





108 



Mass. Bay Transportation Authority 

Elderly Retiree Program 

Motor Vehicle Excise Tax Bills 

State Assessment System 

Metropolitan Area Planning Council 
Underestimates of 1968 

County Tax 

State Tax and Assessments 
State Recreation Areas 
Mass. Bay Transportation Authority 
Overlay of Current Year 

GROSS AMOUNT TO BE RAISED 

ESTIMATED RECEIPTS AND AVAILABLE FUNDS 

ESTIMATED RECEIPTS 

1969 Estimated Receipts from the Local Aid 



7,329.12 
803.27 
701.55 
262.36 
275.57 


24,112.25 


5,736.11 


5,736.11 


973 .10 
.04 


973.14 
89,486.03 




3,423,842.64 



and Agency Funds 




438,846.52 




Motor Vehicle and Trailer Excise 




211,500.00 




Licenses 




9,000.00 




Fines 




800.00 




Schools (local receipts of School 








Committee) 




300.00 




Interest 








On Taxes and Assessments 


2,800.00 






On Deposit 


4,200.00 


7,000.00 




Water Department Offset 




144,698.82 




Rents 




2,800.00 




TOTAL ESTIMATED RECEIPTS 




814,945.34 



AVAILABLE FUNDS TO BE USED 

Overestimate of 1968 to be used 
as Available Funds 

Metropolitan Parks 85.15 

Amounts voted to be taken from Available Funds 

Article 8 — Dog Funds 905.85 

Article 9 — Use of Assessors in 

fixing Tax Rate 65.000.00 

Article 10 — Reserve Fund 25,000.00 

Article 14 — Stabilization Fund 45,000.00 

Article 17 — Library Maintenance 1,460.00 

Article 24 — Reconstruction, resurfacing 

and installation for necessary 

drainage on highways 7,681.76 

Article 38 — Improvement and enlargement 

of Woodside Cemetery 4,000.00 

Article 43 — Connection of Police-Fire 

Department Headquarters to 

Municipal Sewerage Treatment Plant 1,333.18 



150,380.79 
TOTAL AVAILABLE FUNDS 150,465.94 



109 



TOTAL ESTIMATED RECEIPTS AND 

AVAILABLE FUNDS 965,411.28 

Gross Amount to be Raised 3,423,842.64 

Total Estimated Receipts 814,945.34 

Total Available Funds 150,465.94 965,411.28 

NET AMOUNT TO BE RAISED BY 
TAXATION ON PROPERTY 2,458,431.37 

NET AMOUNT TO BE RAISED BY TAXATION 
ON PROPERTY 

Total Valuation, Real Estate 

$19,019,820.00 @ $122.50 2,329,927.95 

Total Valuation, Personal Property 

$1,048,972.63 @ $122.50 128,499.15 

Gain on account of fractional division 

of tax rate 4.27 

TOTAL TAXES LEVIED ON PROPERTY 2,458,431.37 



Number of bills on Personal Estate 329. 

Number of bills on Real Estate 2,740 

Total number of bills 3,069 

Number of Horses assessed 27 

Number of Cattle assessed 4 

Number of all other Animals 7 
Number of Acres of Land assessed 4,082.856 

Number of Dvi^elling Houses assessed 1,943 



ABATEMENTS GRANTED DURING 1969 



LEVY OF THE YEAR 1967 

Real Estate Tax 232.30 

Motor Vehicle and Trailer Excise 59.40 

LEVY OF THE YEAR 1968 

Real Estate Tax 262.60 

Personal Property Tax 400.40 

Motor Vehicle and Trailer Excise 3,793.42 

LEVY OF THE YEAR 1969 

Real Estate Tax 83,745.67 

Personal Property Tax 1,024.13 

Motor Vehicle and 

Trailer Excise 14,540.41 



110 



REPORT OF THE LIBRARIAN, COHASSET FREE PUBLIC 
LIBRARY/PAUL PRATT MEMORIAL LIBRARY 

I am pleased to submit my first amiual report to the two library 
boards and to the citizens. The year 1969 marks the beginning of a new 
chapter in Cohasset's long and notable history of support and use of its 
public library service. Effective January 1, library employees were classi- 
fied under the Town classification plan and transferred to the Town pay- 
roll. A further improvement in administration is recommended by the two 
library boards for action at the next Town Meeting: this change would 
have the Town Treasurer hold custody of all library funds, eliminating 
the present system involving three Treasurers. 

This year salaries and book budget were upgraded significantly. Li- 
brary hours were expanded to provide more evening hours and Sunday 
afternoon openings. The periodical collection was doubled in size and 
increased emphasis placed on the purchase of adult non-fiction. A new 
art print lending service was initiated. Expanded use was made of the 
Eastern Massachusetts Regional Library System with the initiation of 
monthly visits by the Regional Bookmobile, and with increased use of 
inter-library loan and telephone reference service. Furnishing of the 
library's attractive meeting room (built in 1964) was completed and use 
of this room greatly increased, both for library programs, and as a meet- 
ing place for citizen groups. 

DEVELOPMENT AND USE OF THE COLLECTIONS 

Circulation 

Total (Home 

Purchased Gifts Withdrawn Holdings Use) 

15,947 

26,396 

25,409 42,343 

10,091 

24,154 

9,926 34,245 

6,685 

734 2,289 

36,069 85,562 

The total circulation of 85,562 equals 15 loans to every man, woman, 
and child in Cohasset (1960 population), which compares favorably with 
the state-wide average of less than 7 loans per capita. This is primary 
evidence that the people want and will use their public library. The retail 
value of library materials borrowed for home use is more than $400,000 — 
or $60 worth of materials per capita. One case study revealed that a 
family of five borrowed over $3,000 worth of library materials in one 
year, much of which was used by several members of the family. These 
observations suggest that the taxpayers arc offered, and receive, a good 
return on their investment of about $2.50 on the tax rate. 

Ill 



Adult Nonfiction 


1,325 


74 


103 


Adult Fiction 


390 


79 


115 


Total Adult Books 


1,715 


153 


218 


Juvenile Nonfiction 


329 




148 


Juvenile Fiction 


395 




167 


Total Juvenile Books 


724 




315 


Periodical Subscriptions 


190 


20 




Recordings 


188 






TOTALS 









The book budget was stretched by buying more paperbacks, es- 
pecially quality paperbacks in adult nonfiction; 21% oi total books added 
during the year were paperbacks. Many books are being published 
originally as paperbacks. Paperbacks are especially useful as additional 
copies of popular titles. 

NEW REGISTRATIONS: 327 adults, 226 children. This is eight or 
nine percent of the total population registering for the first time durmg 
the year. 

LIBRARY USE STUDY 

A detailed analysis was made of people coming into the library 
(traffic) and of materials loaned out (circulation) from October 1 to 
December 31. Also, beginning October 1, hours of opening were expanded 
to provide eight more hours a week during evenings and Sunday after- 
noons. The objective of the study was to have concrete knowledge as to 
which hours of the day were used by whom ,and just how much public 
service (direct contact) was performed at any time. This study is limited: 
it did not count reference and research and advisory services, which are 
not reflected in circulation figures. However, traffic figures do suggest the 
extent of these services. We counted adults, teenagers, and children sep- 
erately. 

Total traffic for the three months: 16,355. 

Projected annual traffic: 65,420, or about 10 visits per capita. 

Daily average traffic: 230. Hourly average traffic: 20.6. 

The traffic into the library is 54% adults, 17% teenagers, and 29% 

children. During evening and Sunday hours the traffic is 41% adults, 
41% teenagers, and 18% children. 

Monthly average traffic, by group, in round figures: 2,950 adults, 
1,000 teenagers, 1,500 children. 

Hourly traffic during evening hours increased by one-third over a 
similar study in January, seeming to indicate that staying open every 
night is more successful than opening only two nights. 

Saturday is the library's busiest day, with hourly traffic of 25 and 
hourly loans of 40.5 — a loan every 90 seconds. 

Sunday afternoons and weekdays after school rank next in popularity, 
followed by early afternoons, evenings, and mornings. Morning hours 
are especially valuable to adults who are free to use the library when it 
is relatively quiet. Evening and Sunday hours are especially valuable to 
working people and older students. 

The rate at which materials were loaned out for home use averaged 
27.6 per hour, a loan every two minutes, over 300 a day. 

Sixty percent of nonfiction circulation and fifty-two percent of fiction 
circulation are adult materials. A significant, but unmeasured, part of this 
use of adult materials is by students. 

112 



COMPARISON OF CIRCULATION LAST FOUR MONTHS 
(SEPT. — DEC.) 1968 & 1969 

Adult Materials Children's Materials 

Nonfiction Fiction Periodical Recording Nonfiction Fiction 

1968 4,981 8,968 2,026 822 2,938 7,288 

1969 5,689 8,682 3,001 942 3,207 7,890 
% Change +14% —3% +48% +15% +9% +8% 

The increased use of periodicals and adult nonfiction is a reflection 
of the library's increased commitment in these areas, based on the best 
judgment we can make about the community's needs and interests. We 
welcome requests and suggestions: citizens have the right to expect their 
library to meet every reasonable request either by purchase or through 
cooperating libraries in the Regional Library System. 

SERVICE TO CHILDREN 

Of particular interest is the steady growth in service to children (see 
comparison above). The recent, rapid development of school libraries and 
of library-oriented, independent learning methods in education will create 
more demand for public library services, not only to students, but in- 
creasingly to graduates of this more effective education. We are experi- 
encing more student demand, and parental complaints when we fail. One 
recent sampling by our Children's Librarian indicated that 80% of her 
assistance to students and parents was for school-related work. We wel- 
come this student use, and urge parents to let us know when the collec- 
tions or assistance seem to be inadequate. A project for the coming year 
is to develop a new program of coordination with the schools with respect 
to student services. 

We believe that one of the most important areas of library service 
is that to children. It is the child's experiences with books and with learn- 
ing that shape his life-long attitudes and habits in reading and learning 
skills. The public library should be a place of free inquiry and exploration 
for the child just as it is for the adult citizen. 

Weekly pre-school programs of stories and games are regularly con- 
ducted for as many groups as express interest. The groups are limited to 
twenty, and each series runs ten weeks. 

REQUESTS, RESERVES AND REFERENCE 

The library is not simply a self-service take-it-or-leave-it operation. 
We believe that ever>' citizen has the right to expect the library to per- 
form as an information and cultural resource service to the fullest capa- 
bility of its, and the regional system's staff and collections. In the case of 
popular books for which there is great demand we aim to buy enough 
copies so that no one has to wait more than six weeks. During the year, 
about 2,000 special requests were processed for books not immediately 
available. The number of such requests per month doubled between the 

113 



beginning and the end of the year, running now about 200 a month. Re- 
searching and processing each request takes time, ranging from minutes 
to hours. Very few are not filled. 

About ten percent of the book budget goes into non-circulating 
reference materials (most of which will be circulated, however, on special 
arrangement). The use of these materials, and staff assistance in their use, 
is an important part of library activity which is not reported m circulation 
figures and is hard to measure quantitatively. 

FEDERAL GRANT FOR ART SERVICE 

The library was one of a few Massachusetts public libraries to obtain 
during the year a special grant under the federal Library Services and 
Construction Act, Title I, for a pilot service project. We purchased twelve 
art prints — a unique decision since most siniilar programs involve in- 
expensive reproductions — representing a wide range of contemporary 
print techniques by nationality recognized artists. A committee of local 
citizens knowledgeable in the arts was appointed to advise the library in 
this selection. The prints are available to adult borrowers free of charge 
for a loan period of six weeks. 

FRIENDS OF THE COHASSET LIBRARY 

This citizen's organization of 200 due-paying members organized 
in 1968, renders valuable service to the Town. It provides a broadly- 
based group for improving communication between library and com- 
munity. Through its activity the library becomes more responsive to the 
public's needs and interests, and the public becomes more aware of available 
services. A program of volunteer library aides was begun in April. During 
the remaining nine months of the year, twenty-three Friends volunteered 
557 hours of service at such tasks as assisting at the service desks and at 
clerical tasks. Special projects were undertaken and more are being 
planned to utilize this talent and improve the library's service. In addi- 
tion to these scheduled assignments, countless other hours were contributed 
by the "Friends" in such services as frequently arranging new displays of 
art work (thanks to the art teachers and students of Cohasset, the Scouting 
organizations, and individuals for providing exhibit materials); planning 
and assisting at programs for adults and children (films, lectures, art pro- 
grams); and public relations. In addition to these valuable services the 
Friends raise funds for special programs, experimental services, and fur- 
nishings which the Town otherwise would do without. 

THE LIBRARY'S FUTURE 

Our urbanized and well-educated society is producing greater de- 
mand than ever before for information services and cultural opportimities. 
In the past decade the nation's public libraries increased their expendi- 
tures for books by approximately 250 percent. The number of new books 
published each year has doubled in that decade to about 30,000 titles a 
year. The public librar}' is an indispensible point of access to this "informa- 
tion explosion" when it does a good job of selecting a useful and inter- 
esting portion of this total output for its audience. 

114 



The decade of the 70's will without doubt see an even greater boom 
in reading and the use of libraries. New technology will bring information 
• resources closer to individuals and will link libraries together as more 
effective elements in an information network. Information production 
and dissemination is becoming America's basic industry. The pace of 
change and the growing need for problem-solving activity is transforming 
education and jobs and putting a premium on people who can learn, 
adapt and grow continuously. The politics of ecology will dominate the 
decade and force a reconsideration of individual and national purposes. 
James E. Allen, Jr., U.S. Commissioner of Education, has recently called 
for "a total national commitment to, and involvement in, the achievement 
of the right to read." Says Allen: "We should immediately set for our- 
selves the goal of ensuring that by the end of the 1970's the right to read 
shall be a reality for all: that no one shall leave our schools without the 
skill and the desire necessary to read to the full limits of his capability." 
He believes that lack of motivation and ability in reading represents 
barriers to success and satisfaction in life for more than a quarter of the 
population, and that this lack is a problem "so grave in its import for our 
Nation that it must receive immediate attention." Our society will face 
up to this challenge and as it dpes our libraries will provide a vital service 
to more people than ever before. 

Respectfully submitted, 

RICHARD E. HAYES 

Chief Librarian 

REPORT OF THE PAUL PRATT MEMORIAL LIBRARY 

Financial Statement for the year 1969 





Town 


PPML 


CFPL 




Treasurer 


Treasurer 


Treasurer 


Balances 1-1-69 




3,521.46 


1,297.58 


Income 








Town Appropriation - 








Nantasket Library 


1,000.00 






Town Approp. - PPML Salaries 


31,412.00 






Town Approp. - PPML Expenses 




12,325.00 




Town - PPML Easement 




100.00 




Sale of Property 




45.00 




CFPL Trust Funds 








Dividends 






1,833.83 


Benjamin Blake Bequest 






237.07 


Underwood Account Withdrawr 


I 




1,462.27 


Insurance Policy Dividend 




4,025.00 


51.60 


CFPL Transfer 




Petty Cash Receipts 




2,077.51 




TOTALS 


32,412.00 


22,093.97 


4,882.35 


Expenditures 








Nantasket Library 


1,000.00 






PPML Salaries 


31,026.26 







115 



Books, Periodicals, Recordings 


11,415.30 




Library & Office Supply & Expenses 


2,578.23 




Heat, Light, & Phone 


2,684.62 




Building Maintenance, Supply & Insurance 


2,663.69 


348.00 


Transfer to PPML 




4,025.00 


TOTALS 32,026.26 


19,341.84 


4,373.00 


Balances 12-31-69 385.74 


2,752.13 


509.35 



TOTAL ACTUAL EXPENDITURES $51,716.10 

REPORT OF THE PLANNING BOARD 

The past year was an extremely active year for the board. Though 
we approved less small subdivisions than during the past several years, 
we did approve one large development containing 73 lots. The total lots 
approved during the year was 111. The large subdivision was the Bayside 
development presented to the board by Walter K. Winchester. This occu- 
pied iQuch of our time entailing many on site inspections, lengthy meet- 
ings with various interested boards and committees. We approved this, 
with 1 eservations, after considerable thought. 

Wg also held a public hearing relating to amending our by-laws. The 
proposed amendments were later accepted by the town at a special town 
meeting. 

In September we met with a representative from the Department of 
Comr lunity Affairs relative to updating the Benjamin Report, which con- 
trary 5:o many we use as guidelines for our work. We expect to complete 
this project in the late spring of this year. 

The ensuing year should see changes in the board's operations, as 
three members will not be with us after the March elections. 

It seems in this day and age criticism is often given, praise very sel- 
dom. As chairman of this board, I would now like to mention the in- 
spiring and progressive work that our senior member, Nathan W. Bates, 
continues to do. The board and town are very fortunate indeed to have 
men of Mr. Bates caliber serving us. 

Again, our appreciation to all departments, boards, and committees 
for their cooperation during the past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

LAWRENCE D. AINSLIE 
NATHAN W. BATES 
NORMAN W. BROWN 
GILBERT S. TOWER 
JOHN H. BARRETT, Chairman 



116 



REPORT OF THE TREE WARDEN 

Last winter snow left many of the trees in poor shape. The Depart- 
ment tried to pick up and clean up the debris left by the storms. Sidewalks 
and roadways were cut back where it was necessary. 

The Tree Department used the Highway Department's men and trucks 
to help perform these duties. The roadsides were mowed and in many 
places picked up. Many of the dead maples were cut and many more have 
to come down. These trees have lived their normal life. The asphalt roads 
and sidewalks have cut off the feeding area. The salt and utilities have 
contributed also. 

The Brockton Edison have helped to prune and cut dead limbs in 
many spots. 

The Department has two trucks and a pickup. One of the trucks is 
being used by the Highway Department to plow snow and to be in 
service when storms strike. 

Respectfully submitted, 
LOUIS C. BAILEY, JR. 

REPORT OF THE WIRE DEPARTMENT 

The following is the annual report of the Wire Department for the 
year 1969. 

Fire Alann & Police Signal 

Ten miles of new overhead wire was installed to replace old wire. 
The storm of last February which blew down all wires along the water 
front were replaced with a new stronger type wire which should give bet- 
ter service in the event of a severe storm. 

New cross arms and hardware were replaced where needed. Four 
new fire alarm boxes were installed to give better coverage. New parts 
were replaced in traffic signal equipment because of wear and damage. 

Town Owned Buildings 

All repairs of electrical equipment and wiring was done by this de- 
partment. The wiring and installation of electrical equipment in the last 
addition to the High School was carefully inspected by this department. 

Wire Inspection 

Work by electrical contractors was inspected and permits and fees 
were filed with the Town Accountant and Treasurer. 

I wish to express my thanks to the Honorable Board of Selectmen, 
aU Town Officials and the men who worked with me. 

Respectfully yours, 

EDWARD P. MALLEY 
Superintendent of Wires 

117 



REPORT OF THE 
SOUTH SHORE REGIONAL SCHOOL DISTRICT COMMITTEE 

Total school enrollment continues to grow satisfactorily. During the 
1968-1969 school year, the enrollment in the regular full time day pro- 
grams was 283. At the present time the enrollment is 322. In addition, 
there are work-study programs and evening trade programs attended 
regularly by about 125 youths and adults. 

Growth in all areas — more boys being trained for worthwhile em- 
ployment, more available jobs opening, more satisfied employers seeking 
our graduates, and more pay for graduates all combine to make the 
committee pleased. 

Unfortunately the above credits do not apply to Cohasset as we 
continue to take little advantage of the facility. 

Enrollment from Cohasset during 1968-1969 was five, and the 
1969-1970 enrollment from Cohasset is eight. 

Since the school opened in 1962, but fourteen Cohasset youths have 
graduated. 

This is most discouraging to your committee representative, but 
he continues to look forward to more enrolees as time goes on, and con- 
tinues to feel that Cohasset should be proud to be a part of the region — 
just as long as it satisfies the vocational desires of even a small number of 
boys who do attend. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN A. GEARY 
Cohasset Representative 
South Shore Regional 
School District Committee 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL FACILITIES COMMITTEE 

Work of this committee during 1969 was divided between comple- 
tion of the second addition to the High School and purchasing a site for 
future schools. 

After numerous delays the new gymnasium was ready for use in 
February. Although this was the last major item of the addition, various 
loose ends such as roof leaks and equipment deficiencies remained to be 
resolved. 

The so-called "phase two" part of the project covering the new ath- 
letic field, tennis courts, parking lot and access road were completed. The 
need to correct flaws in the surface of the tennis courts delayed opening 
them to use until fall. Under-estimates in drainage for the whole area 
caused considerable expense for alterations and additions. As grass growth 
in the field was poor, fall reseeding was necessary and it is hoped this 
needed play area will be usable by the summer of 1970. 

118 



The Annual Town Meeting voted $6400 in Article 47 for the use 
of the committee in studying sites for future schools. Goldberg-Zoino As- 
sociates, Inc. were engaged as soil and foundation engineers. This firm 
confirmed the committee's choice of a 71 acre site off the southerly side 
of Sohier Street as the best available land. Its report issued in June ad- 
vised that there are several buildable sites. 

The committee obtained from David L. Gary and John D. Hewitt 
2 separate professional appraisals which enabled the committee to set a 
total approximate price of $135,000 as a fair value for the land. 

An Article covering purchase of this tract was inserted in the war- 
rant for a Special Town Meeting on December 2. To inform our citizens, 
a four page leaflet was produced by the committee and a public hearing 
was held on November 25. 

This matter was complicated by the purchase and laying out of a 
large subdivision over much of the area by Walter K. Winchester. As the 
committee was able to negotiate with only the South Shore Playhouse 
Associates, Inc., the properties of Winchester and Cohasset Estates, 
Inc. were i scommended for purchase by eminent domain. 

As can be noted in the Town Clerk's report of the meeting, it was 
overwhelmingly voted to purchase this property which should be bene- 
ficial to Cohasset for many years. 

Respectfully submitted, 

AUSTIN L. AHERN, JR., Chairman 
LOT E. BATES, JR. 
ALEXANDER BOYT, JR. 
ALBERT P. BUCKLEY 
SHEILA S. EVANS (Mrs. Donald) 
BARBARA M. POWER (Mrs. Jeffrey) 
JOHN P. REARDON, JR. 
SUMNTER SMITH, JR. 
DAVID C. WHIPPLE 



11-9 



REPORT OF THE FIRE DEPARTMENT 

I herewith submit the Annual Report of the Fire Department for the 
year ending December 31, 1969. 

Inventory of Automotive Equipment of the Fire Department 



Stationed Make 

Headquarters - Pirsch 

No. Cohasset - Pirsch 

Beechwood - Mack 

Headquarters - Ford 

Headquarters - Pirsch 
Headquarters - Dodge 

Type of Vehicle 

Four door Sedan 
Panel Truck 



Year Company 

1961 Engine 1 



Type of Equipment 

750 GPM Triple Combination 
Pumping Engine 

1954Engine 2 750 GPM Triple Combmation 
Pumping Engine 

1950Engine 3 500 GPM Triple Combination 
Pumping Engine 

1953Engine 4 500 GPM — 400 gallon Water 
tank 

1947Ladder 1 65 foot Junior Aerial 

1955Forest 500 GPM — 400 gallon Water 

tank 



Miscellaneous Vehicles 

Department Use Make 

Chief's car Ford 

Lighting Plant Ford 

(Department built) 



Year 

1967 
1953 



During the year 1969 the routine maintenance of all vehicles was 
carried out. Repairs such as spark plugs, points and so forth were made, 
as well as lubrication and oil changes. Replacement of parts, tires and 
batteries were made as needed. 

The motor in Engine 3, a 1950 Mack, was replaced due to a faulty 
block. This was discovered in attempting to relieve a problem in starting. 

The transmission was rebuilt in Ladder 1, a 1947 Pirsch, new gears, 
bearings, shafts and seals were installed. 

The motor in the Forest Fire Truck a 1955 Dodge, was entirely re- 
built, clutch replaced and transmission repairs made. 

AH of this maintenance and repair was done within the Fire Depart- 
ment, with the exception of the required machine shop work. The depart- 
ment is fortunate in having a firefighter who is capable of performing this 
work. The results of this are not only the substantial doUar saving to the 
Town, but the equally important reduction in time that the apparatus is 
out of service. 

In the preceding Inventory of Apparatus the ages of the equipment 
indicate that replacements are forth coming. Also that the addition of a 



120 



four wheel drive vehicle for general service to the department is needed. 
A standard type vehicle could be slightly modified to fill this need — and 
provide us with a smaller more maneuverable piece of equipment for 
woods fires, for operations in tight areas and general service. This fol- 
lowed by the replacement of Engine 4 with a squad or rescue type ve- 
hicle — combining the lighting plant would result in a better distribution 
of equipment and would end up in the same total pieces of equipment to 
be housed and maintained. 

Replacement of pumping engines in the future will have to be 
guided by what action is taken toward replacement of the existing sub- 
stations. The available space in these stations makes a change in apparatus 
almost impossible. The trend in modem apparatus being toward larger 
capacity pumps and greater water carrying capacity. This results in larger 
and heavier vehicles. 

Personnel 

The Permanent Firefighters and Officers of the department work 
a 56 hour per week schedule which results in their being divided into 
three groups, each commanded by an Officer. The following table shows 
that there is only one person assigned, per shift, to each of the various 
companies. This makes effective firefighting difficult until such time as 
additional help arrives. Also the Officers of the department have to per- 
form firefighters duties during periods of sickness and vacation. This 
lessens their value as an Officer because of the need to perform two jobs 
at one time. 

Chief 

Charles Piepenbrink 

Deputy Chief 

Cornelius J. O'Brien 

Captains 

George E. Casey 
Thomas W. Heman, Jr. 

Firefighters 

oup 1 Group 2 

, C. Wheelwright R. Perroncello 



Headquarters G; 

Engine 1 W 

Engine 4 

Ladder 1 E. 

North Cohasset 



Group 3 

E. J. Sullivan 



Engine 2 
Beechwood 
Engine 3 
Fire Alarm 

Headquarters 



P. Barrow P. A. Grassie J. W. Nash, Jr. 

J. F. Thompson W. L. Nickerson L. L. Davis 
A. E. Studley R. W. Lincohi R. M. Conley 



F. S. Wheelwright D. R. Marks 



The personnel and organization listed above is under Civil Service, 
entrance and promotion to all grades is based on experience and com- 



121 



petitive examination. There is presently one vacancy on the above roster, 
due to the disability retirement of Firefighter Robert J. Henn which was 
effective December 9, 1969. 

Call Firefighting Personnel 

Call Firefighters upon hearing a coded signal on the fire alarm sys- 
tem respond to the location and supplement the regular fire force. TTiis 
call can come at any time of day or night and under any kind of weather 
condition . . . their dedication to duty is hopefully appreciated by their 
fellow townspeople. They are assigned as follows: 

Headquarters 

Engine 1 

Engine 4 
Ladder 1 



C. W. Frates, Captain T. M. Healy, Jr. W. E. Poland 
B. W. Pratt E. H. Pratt R. W. Rosano 

J. A. Silvia R. L. Yocum 



N. J. Delaney 
J. A. Migliaccio 
B. J. Salvador 



C. J. Dickson 
H. H. Ritter 

D. H. Wniiams 



W. D. Enos 
M. E. Salvador 



W. E. Brooke R. F. Leonard 

E. R. McArthur, Jr. J. W. Rosano 



H. M. Silvia 
H. wniiams. Jr. 



North Cohasset 

Engine 2 



Beechwood 

Engine 3 



A. L. Clark, Captain C. T. Chesire A. EmanueUo 
D. R. EmanueUo P. V. EmanueUo S. P. Kent 
J. M. MacNeiU L. D. Sorrentino 

D. F. Ainslie J. F. Collins, Jr. H. E. Marsh 

L. J. Fiori, Jr. D. L. KeUey J. J. DelSasso 

V. E. Tibbetts H. Maynard 



Sammary of Alarms and Emergency Calls 

BeU Alarms (Whistle sounded) 79 

StiU Alarms 236 



Total 315 

This summary is broken down into the foUowing classifications: 

Flammable liquids 2 

Electrical 12 

Automobiles, trucks and trailers 29 

Structural 28 

False Alarms 10 

First Aid, Inhalation & Resuscitation 63 

Accidental or needless 6 

Smoke and Gas Investigations 

involving structures 54 

Woods, grass and brush 61 



122 



Dump 3 

Miscellaneous 24 

Mutual Aid Scituate 6 

Hull 6 

Hingham 11 

Stations and Equipment 

Approved in the 1969 Budget was the sum of $420.00 for the pur- 
chase of a new inhalator-resuscitator. This was purchased and placed into 
service on April 1, 1969. This replaced a 27 year old machine, which 
was kept and will be used as a reserve unit. 

In keeping with the usual practice of replacing fire hose . . . 700 feet 
of double jacket IVi inch and 150 feet of double jacket 1^/^ inch hose 
was purchased. Due to the effects of inflation it is necessary this year to 
increase the amount expended for fire hose in order to maintain an ade- 
quate inventory. 

The many and varied tools and appliances of the department were 
maintained, cleaned and checked periodically throughout the year. 

Again I must repeat that the sub-stations at Beechwood and North 
Cohasset are poorly located, outdated and totally inadequate. They should 
be replaced as soon as possible with a modern fireproof building capable 
of housing at least four engines and a proportionate number of men. This 
structure should be located so as to gain good access to both the North 
Cohasset and Beechwood areas. 

Repairs to the floor at Station 3 were started at the end of 1969 and 
will be carried over into 1970. This required the removal of a rotted 
wooden floor, filling of the area with gravel and the pouring and finishing 
with cement. 

Recommendations 

There are three areas that require your thoughtful consideration, 
they are: 

1. The replacement of the North Cohasset and Beechwood Fire 
Stations as mentioned above. 

2. The adoption of a building code, which is currently under study. 
This would provide some fire protection to buildings and their 
occupants through sound and accepted building practices. 

3. The addition of at least six permanent firefighters to the depart- 
ment to provide adequate manning during periods of iUness and 
vacation as well as extra manning during the winter months 
when operations are difficult and hazardous. This can be ac- 
complished by the gradual addition of men over a period of a 
few years. 

Appreciation 

In the past year the department lost one permanent firefighter, 

123 



Robert J. Henn, due to a disability retirement. He was appointed January 
16, 1956 and retired December 9, 1969. 

Call Fire Captain Edward P. Malley, assigned to Ladder 1, retired. 
Captain Malley was appointed to the department August 1, 1929 and re- 
tired November 30, 1969 . . . over 40 years of service to the department. 

The unfortunate death of Call Firefighter Robert V. Andrews, as- 
signed to Ladder 1 and who also served as Assistant Director of Civil 
Defense. Call Firefighter Andrews deserves the credit for his efforts and 
hard work in assembling the Lighting Plant presently in service. 

To these men I would like to extend the thanks and appreciation 
of the Fire Department for their faithful and honorable service. 

In conclusion I would like to extend the thanks of this department 
to the citizens of Cohasset, the Board of Selectmen, the heads and mem- 
bers of all town departments and boards, the call firefighters and the 
permanent officers and men of the department for their cooperation and 
assistance. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHARLES PIEPENBRINK 

Chief of Fire Department 



REPORT OF THE BICENTENNIAL COMMITTEE 

January 1, 1970 marked the opening of the Bicentennial Year. A 
new Town Flag was raised with appropriate ceremonies on the Common 
foUowed by a brief program and reception in Town HaU. 

In May the First Town Meeting will be re-enacted in the old Meet- 
ing House. "Homecoming Days" from July 12th through 26th will include 
a number of events. A Heritage Trail of old homes and historic sites will 
be marked and identified on a map and there wiU be a tour of old homes. 
Cohasset Youth Days, a Clambake on Sandy Beach, and a street parade 
which will include a moving pageant of Cohasset history, are among the 
other events to be staged. In addition, an active waterfront committee is 
making plans for several events which will recall our maritime history. 

The Bicentennial Committee is very gratified by the number of citizens 
who have volunteered their services in many areas. The enthusiastic par- 
ticipation of a large number of citizens will assure the success of this im- 
portant celebration. 



124 



REPORT OF THE TOWN ACCOUNTANT 

To the Board of Selectmen and the Citizens of the Town of Cohasset 

Submitted herewith is the Town Accountant's Annual Report in 
accordance with Section 61 of Chapter 41 of the General Laws of Mass- 
achusetts, for the year ending December 31, 1969. 

(1) Detailed statement of receipts and expenditures. 

(2) Trust funds in custody of Treasurer and Library Trustees. 

(3) Statement of Town debt. 

(4) Summary of appropriations and other accounts. 

(5) Balance Sheet — December 31, 1969 General Accounts. 

The books and accounts of the Town for the period September 1, 
1966, to April 30, 1969, were examined by auditors from the Bureau 
of Accounts of the Department of Corporations and Taxation. A copy of 
their detailed report is on file in the Selectmen's office. 

Chapter 41, Section 58 of the General Laws require that each head of 
the department, board or committee authorized to expend money, to 
furnish the Town Accountant at the close of the financial year, a list of 
bills remaining unpaid, showing to whom and for what due and their 
amounts. 

Invoice amounting to $133.65 has been reported as being unpaid. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WILLIAM S. SIGNORELLI 
Town Accountant 





RECEIPTS 








General Revenue 








TAXES 






Current Year: 








Personal 




$126,100.82 




Real Estate 




2,158,276.14 




Recovery of Taxes 




1,470.00 


$2,285,846.96 


Previous Years; 






Personal 




1,817.64 




Real Estate 




52,740.85 


54,558.49 


From State: 






Valuation Basis 




179,328.40 




School Aid — Chapter 


70 


96,246.27 


275,574.67 


Tax Title Redemptions 




2,622.39 


Total Taxes 


2,618,602.51 




UCENSES AND PERMITS 




Beer, Wines and Liquor 




3,425.00 




To Carry Fire Arms 




132.00 





125 



Common Victualer 90.00 

Week Day and Sunday Amusement 133.00 

Food Service 55.00 

Selling Motor Vehicles Class No. 1 100.00 

Selling Motor Vehicles Class No. 2 45.00 

Sewerage Disposal 294.00 

Plumbing 508.00 

Building . 1,492.00 

Gas 184.00 

Clam Diggings 290.00 

Disposal Works Installer 85.00 

Transport Offal and Rubbish 55.00 

Mooring Permits 4,784.75 

Firearms Identification Cards 416.00 

All Other Miscellaneous 226.50 



Total Licenses and Permits 

FINES 

Court Fines 

GRANTS 

Grants: 
From Federal Government 
Medical Assistant for Aged 

Assistance 1,449.72 

Water Pollution Control — Construction 170,600.00 

School Lunches 19,327.41 

Schools — Public Law #85-864 13,625.55 
Schools — Public Law #874 14,710.50 
Schools — Public Law #89-10 3,923.00 
Schools — PubUc Law #88-210 240.00 51,826.46 



From County: 






Dog Licenses 




905.85 


From State: 






Shellfish Propagation 


200.00 




Highways Chap. 616 






Acts of 1967 


7,681.76 




School Aid — Construction 


65,169.62 




Library Aid 


1,460.00 




School Transportation — 






Chap. 71 


45,829.68 




Chapter 506 Acts of 






1966 (Schools) 


7,129.04 




Special Education Programs 






.Chapter 69 and 71 


33,150.00 




Outside School Transportations 






Chapter 74 


183.26 




Regional School District Aid 






Chapter 71 


14,369.36 


175,172.72 



Total Grants 

rOTAL GENERAL REVENUE 

COMMERCIAL REVENUE 

Privileges: 

1966 Motor Vehicle and Trailer Excise 51.85 



126 



1967 Motor Vehicle and Trailer Excise 159.23 

1968 Motor Vehicle and Trailer Excise 16,273.00 

1969 Motor Vehicle and Trailer Excise 185,622.86 



Total Commercial Revenue 202,106.94 

DEPARTMENTAL REVENUE 

General Government: 
Town Treasurer: 

Tax Title Redemption Recording 4.50 

Town Collector: 

Lien Certificates 381.18 

Town Hall: 

Rental 400.00 

Police Department: 



432.62 
465.70 

614.55 

Tree Department: 

Insurance Claim — Workmen's Compensation 131.88 

Board of Health: (Town Dump) 

Recovery — Damage to Fence 56.00 

Highways: 

Joint Maintenance — County 2,000.00 

Joint Maintenance — State 2,000.00 

Chap. 90 Construction — County 3,122.45 7,122.45 



Insurance Claim 


358.07 


Sale of Unclaimed Property 


65.00 


Recovery — Damage to 




Police Vehicle 


9.55 


Sealer of Weights and Measures: 




Permits 




Wire Department: 




Permits 


499.75 


Recovery — Damage to 




Traffic Light 


114.80 



Other Receipts from State: 






Disability Assistance 


25.13 




General Relief 


219.51 




Medical Aid to Aged 


2,617.98 




Veterans' Benefits 


6,026.31 


8,888.93 


Schools: 






Lunches 


55,291.31 




Rentals 


249.09 




Athletic Receipts 


3,430.40 




Tuition — Summer School 


195.00 




Sale of Surplus Equipment 


269.50 


59,435.30 



UNCLASSIFIED REVENUE 

Unclassified: 
Bates Building 

Rent 90.00 

North Cohasset Post Office Building 

Rent 660.00 

Government Island Real Estate 

127 



Rent / 


1,820.00 


Town Hall 




Rent Office Space — 




State Welfare Dept. 


500.00 


Sale of Town Maps, Histories, etc. 


118.22 


Sale of Street Lists 


158.00 


Insurance Recovery — 




Damages to Stone Wall 


125.00 



Total Unclassified Revenue 

WATER DEPARTMENT 

1967 Water Liens 142.71 

1968 Water Liens 1,215.47 

1969 Water Liens 7,363.34 

1968 Water Meters 12,147.47 

1969 Water Meters 107,174.23 
1969 Water Services 2,745.00 

1968 Water Miscellaneous 607.02 

1969 Water Miscellaneous 2,228.16 
Hydrant Services — 1969 21,700.00 



Total Interest 

MUNICIPAL INDEBTEDNESS 

Temporary Loans: 

Anticipation of Revenue 1,300,000.00 

Anticipation of Highway Reimbursement 4,000.00 



3,471.22 



Total Water Revenue 






155,323.40 






CEMETERIF«S 






Sale of Lots and Graves 




INTEREST 




868.00 


Taxes: 










On Deferred Taxes 




3,564.75 






Tax Titles Redeemed 




99.04 






Motor Vehicle Excises 


- 


135.63 


3,799.42 




Trust Funds: 






Wheelwright Park 




731.24 






Wadleigh Park 




243.74 






Billings — Pratt Park 


Fund 


48.74 






Robert Charles Billings 


— 








Town Common 


- 


56.06 


1,079.78 




On Deposits: 






U. S. Treasury Bills 






4,296.65 




Cemeteries: 










Woodside 










Perpetual Care 




1,692.69 






Beechwood 










Perpetual Care 




3.66 






Cedar Street 










Perpetual Care 




200.00 






Charles A. Perkins Cemetery 








Perpetual Care 




500.00 


2,396.35 





Total Temporary Loans 



11,572.20 



1,304,000.00 



128 



AGENCIES — TRUSTS — INVESTMENTS 




Agencies: 






Dog Licenses due County 


1,658.75 




Federal Withheld Tax Deductions 


291,295.15 




State Withheld Tax Deductions 


49,049.61 




Retirement Deductions — County 


35,085.76 




Teachers' Annuity Deductios 


5,485.00 




Teachers' Dues Deductions 


4,001.75 




Teachers' State Retirement Deductions 


54,943.45 




Blue Cross and Blue Shield Deductions 


33,124.10 




Group Life Insurance 


2,657.04 




Trusts: 






Woodside Cemetery Perpetual Care 


7,950.00 




James W. Nichols School Prize Fund — Transfer 


50.00 




Major William Arthur Scholarship Fund — Transfer 500.00 




Conservation Fund — Transfer 


325.00 




Woodside Cemetery — Transfer — 






Investment Funds 


25,221.01 




Investment in U. S. Treasury Bills and 






Certificates of Deposit 


449,105.44 




Total Agencies, Trusts and Investments 




960.452.06 


REFUNDS 






Various Departments 






Tovm Collector — Petty Cash 


50.00 




Fire Dept. Wages 


83.04 




Interest 


3.29 




School Department — General Maintenance 


12.60 




Bicentennial Conmiittee 


330.00 




Library 


1,675.00 




Water Department 


1.17 




Blue Cross & Blue Shield 


466.79 




Health Insurance State Elderly Governmental 






Retiree Program 


24.66 




Total Refunds 




2,646.55 


TOTAL RECEIPTS 


OR 1969 


$5,750,111.04 


TOTAL RECAPITULATION F 




General Revenue 




$3,031,737.56 


Commercial Revenue 




202,106.94 


Departmental Revenue 




77,933.11 


Unclassified Revenue 




3,471.22 


Water Revenue 




155,323.40 


Cemetery Revenue 




868.00 


Interest 




11,572.20 


Municipal Indebtedness 




1,304,000.00 


Agencies, Trusts and Investments 




960,452.06 


Refunds 




2,646.55 



Total Receipts for 1969 5,750,111.04 

Cash Balance, January 1, 1969 288,325.87 



6,038,436.91 
129 



Total Warrants for 1969 

Cash Balance, January 1, 1970 



EXPENDITURES 

General Government 



Moderator 

Salary 
Advisory Committee 
Clerical Services 
Expenses: 
Postage 
Dues 



Personnel Committee 
Expenses: 

Clerical Assistance 

Dues 

Mass. Municip. Training 

Inst. (Tuition) 
Stationery 



Conservation Committee 
Expenses: 

Dues 

Appraisals 

Printing & Stationery, Postage 
Selectmen 
Salaries: 

Chairman 

1 Member 

1 Member 



12.00 
30.00 



20.00 

50.00 
9.00 



1,100.00 
1,000.00 
1,000.00 



Office Salaries 
Expenses: 

Stationery, Postage 
Printing and Advertising 
Telephone 



254.25 

87.30 

301.62 



500.00 
42.00 



Planning Board 






Clerical Assistance 




300.00 


Expenses: 






Printing, Stationery, Postage 


27.14 




Dues 


40.00 




Engineering 


555.84 


622.98 


Zoning Board of Appeals 






Expenses: 






Advertising 




61.07 


Dues 




15.00 


Zoning By-Law Committee 




Expenses: 






Printing Zoning Maps 




745.00 


Surveying 




512.36 


Advertising Zoning By-Laws 




832.00 



50.00 



79.00 



45.00 

125.00 

43.65 



3,100.00 
5,596.96 



5,736,856.77 
$301,580.14 



150.00 



542.00 



922.98 



76.07 



2,089.36 



129.00 



213.65 



130 



Dues 


81.00 


Signs 


14.00 


Gas Permits 


184.00 


Travel 


10.60 


Court Petition 


5.00 


Out of State Travel 




Capital Outlay 




1 Royal Electric Typewriter 




Town Accountant 




Salary of Town Accountant 




Office Salaries 




Expenses: 




Stationery and Postage 


396.21 


Telephone 


231.01 


Travel Expenses 


180.03 


Dues 


25.00 


Maintenance of Office Machines 


145.80 


Binding Ledgers 


65.00 



937.77 

100.20 

294.00 10,028.93 

9,813.61 
7,616.10 



1967 Supplement to Annotated Law 77.50 1,120.55 



Rental of Office Equipment (Xerox Copier) 
Rent 411.00 

Supplies 18.50 429.50 18,979.76 



Town Treasurer 






Salary of Town Treasurer 




7,647.00 


Office Salaries 




5,486.53 


Expenses: 






Stationery, Postage, Office 






Supplies 


780.93 




Travel Expenses 


102.50 




Telephone 


215.35 




Maintenance of Machines 


137.00 




Dues 


23.00 




Certification of Notes 


55.00 




Tax Title 


22.72 


1,336.50 


Out of State Travel 


- 


75.00 


Town Collector 




Salary of Town Collector 




7,168.00 


Office Salaries: 






Deputy Collector 


100.00 




Clerks 


1,812.60 


1,912.60 



14,545.03 



Expenses: 

Stationery, Postage, Office Supplies 545.38 

Printing and Advertising 230.60 

Telephone 168.89 

Travel Expenses 9.05 

Petty Cash 50.00 

Maintenance of Machines 52.25 

Dues 6.00 

Tax Title Takings 32.18 1,094.35 10,174.95 



131 



Salaries: 






Chairman 


1,300.00 




1 Member 


1,200.00 




1 Member 


1,200.00 


3,700.00 


Office Salaries 




8,188.22 


Expenses: 






Stationery, Postage, Office 






Expenses 


536.91 




Telephone 


157.54 




Photostatic copies of real 






estate transfers 


110.22 




Travel Expenses 


61.49 




Tuition-Assessors-School 


50.00 




Dues 


36.00 




Banker & Tradesman 


42.00 




Maintenance of Machines 


64.50 




Home Evaluation Study 


2,108.50 




Assessor's Plats 


1,213.75 




Transfer of Deeds to Plans 


1,073.25 


5,454.16 


Law & Legal Counsel 






Salary of Town Counsel 




5,000.00 


Expenses: 






Telephone 




36.00 


Town Clerk 






Salary of Town Clerk 


2,202.00 


Office Salaries 




3,395.77 


Expenses: 






Recording Fees — Birth, 






Death, Marriage 


435.50 




Administering Oaths 


42.00 




Stationery, Postage, Office 






Expenses 


160.15 




Telephone 


198.26 




Travel Expenses 


133.40 




Dues 


34.00 




Typewriter Maintenance 


10.00 


1,013.31 



Expenses: 




Stationery, Postage, Office 




Expenses 


545.20 


Printing and Advertising 


2,468.52 


Meals 


142.27 


Transporting Election Materials 


30.00 


Rental of Chairs 


252.00 



17,342.38 



5.036.00 



6,611.08 



Elections, Registrations and Town Meetings 
Salaries and Wages: 

Election Officers 821.57 

Registrars 857.00 

Janitor Services 163.17 

Clerical Services 1,739.52 3,581.26 



132 



^^^ Posting Notices 








22.00 






Maintenance of Duplicator 








Machine 


20.00 






Dues 


8.00 


3,487.99 


7,069.25 


Engineering Services and Expenses 






157.06 


Town Hall 








Salary and Wages: 








Custodian 


7,221.00 






Extra Janitor Services 


193.88 


7,414.88 




Expenses: 






Fuel 


1,272.67 






Electric Services 


900.77 






Janitor Supplies 


450.42 






Repairs 


1,390.16 






Rubbish Services 


117.00 






Special Hall License 


25.00 






Telephone Allowance 


36.00 


4,192.02 
1,747.03 




Capital Outlay: Smoke Detection 


System 


13,353.93 


Police Department 






Salaries: 








Chief 




10,282.48 




Lieutenant 


9,130.96 






2 Sergeants 


17,270.24 






Regular Patrolmen 


78,730.73 






Intermittent Patrolmen 


1,888.85 






Overtime Duty 


12,184.80 






Paid Holidays 


4,445.49 






Detective Services 


373.65 


124,024.72 




Expenses: 






Equipment Maintenance: 








Equipment for men 


1,659.67 






Radio Maintenance 


516.56 






Teletype Maintenance 


485.00 






Laundry 


395.37 






Maintenance of Buildings and Grounds: 






Repairs 


93.51 






Janitor Supplies 


197.35 






Janitor Services 


750.00 






Rubbish Services 


60.00 






Printing, Postage, Office 








Supplies 


667.04 






Telephones 


1,425.62 






Travel and Conferences 


163.75 






Ammunition 


184.23 






Dues 


10.00 






Care of Prisoners 


177.37 






Camera Supplies 


69.37 






Annotated Law Supplement 


18.24 






Maintenance of Police Cars: 








Repairs and Supplies 


1,911.71 






Tires and tubes 


633.00 







133 



Gasoline and Oil 2,943.92 

Oxygen and Ambulance Supplies 140.25 12,501.96 



c Capital Outlay: 








(1) 1969 Ford-Trade-In 1967 








Chevrolet 


2,249.00 






Lettering, Radio 








Changeover and Advertising 


76.33 






(1) Resusicitator 


348.78 


2,674.11 


149,483.27 


Fire Department 








Salary and Wages: 








Chief 




10,448.00 




Deputy Chief 


9,466.00 






2 Captains 


17,460.06 






Firefighters 


116,159.97 






Call Men 


6,875.00 






Casual Labor 


515.09 






Paid Holidays 


5,915.37 






Overtime 


5,672.12 


162,063.61 




Expenses: 






Equipment: 








To Carry on Apparatus 


487.65 






Hose 


988.50 






Equipment for Men 


561.70 






Radio maintenance 


480.85 






Other Equipment and repairs 745.03 






Stations 


171.01 







Maintenance of Trucks and Chief's Car 

Gasoline and oil 639.26 

Tires and tubes 353.97 

Repairs and maintenance 2,897.27 

Fuel 498.26 

Lights 419.13 

Maintenance of Buildings and Grounds: 



Repairs 


366.99 


House and Janitor Supplies 


579.13 


Laundry 


169.93 


Refuse Collections 


137.00 


Printing, Postage, Office 




Supplies 


152.54 


Telephones 


1,027.69 


Dues 


55.00 


Hydrant Maintenance 


205.98 


Chief's Expenses 


37.00 


Fire Prevention Education 


116.30 


Out of State Travel 




Capital Outlay: 




(1) Inhalator 


411.00 


(2) Water Heaters-Sub Stations 


200.00 


Police and Fire Headquarters Maintenance 


Expenses: 




Fuel 





11,090.19 
150.00 

611.00 184,362.80 

2,164.35 



134 



r 



Electric services 

Maintenance of Building and Grounds 

Hydrant Services 

Wire Department 
Salaries and Wages: 

Salary of Superintendent 

Wages 7,721.04 

Wages-Storm Damage 478.52 



1,027.90 
765.88 


3,958.13 




24,081.40 


8,730.00 




8,199.56 





I 

I 



t 



Expenses: 








Dues 


15.50 






Supplies and Equipment 


3,009.97 






Wire & Supplies — 








Storm Damage 


902.98 






Maintenance of Truck: 








Gasoline and oil 


196.55 






Repairs 


578.17 






Telephone Allowance 


36.00 






Postage, Printing and 








1 Supplies 


105.00 






■i Automobile Allowance 


350.00 






k Radio Maintenance 


27.20 


5,221.37 


22,150.9^ 


Sealing of Weights and Measures 






■ ' 


Salary of Sealer 




487.00 




Expenses: 








Travel 


5.00 






Supplies and General Expenses 


26.70 






Telephone 


6.30 






Oil Truck Testing 


10.00 


48.00 


535.00 


Insect Pest Extermination — Moth Suppression 






Salaries and Wages: 








Superintendent's Salary 




2,554.50 




Wages 




5,955.32 




Expenses: 








Stationery and Postage 


1.00 






Insecticides 


638.00 






Hardware and Tools 


9.57 






Electric Services 


15.97 






Advertising 


17.15 






Maintenance of Trucks 








Gas and oil 


76.35 






Repairs 


112.96 






Rental of Garage 


120.00 






Private Contractors 


3,365.95 


4,356.95 




Tree Warden 






Salary and Wages: 








Tree Warden 




1,222.50 




Wages 


7,868.48 






J Wages — Storm Damage 


360.51 


8,228.99 





Expenses: 

Insecticides 269.90 

135 



Hardware and Tools 


159.08 




' Maintenance of Trucks: 






Gas and oil 


107.23 




Repairs 


58.69 




Rental of Garage 


120.00 




Registrations 


18.00 




Trees 


18.00 




Roadside Mowing 


735.00 




Dues and Subscriptians 


15.00 


1,500.90 


Civil Defense 






Salaries 






Director 




310.50 


Deputy Director 




150.00 


Expenses: 






Telephone 


159.05 




Stationery and Postage 


8.00 




Electric services-Air Raid Alarms 


15.00 




Remote Control-Air Raid Alarms 


162.00 




Amphibious Duck & Tractor 






Maintenance 


293.66 




Supplies and Equipment 


67.44 


705.15 


Shellfish Warden 






Salary 




200.00 


Expenses: 






Printing, Stationery, Office Expenses 


212.15 



23,819.16 



1,165.65 



412.15 



Board of Health 
Salary: 

Consultant Health Agent 8,018.00 

Expenses: 

Stationery, Printing, Postage 145.32 

Storing Serum 50.00 

Well Baby Clinic - Professional 

Services 450.00 

Laboratory Tests 191.00 

Dues and Meetings 179.64 

Telephone 251.99 

Travel Allowance 560.00 

Plumbing Inspector Fees 464.00 

Medical and Clinical Supplies 76.89 2,368.84 



Out of State Travel 50.00 

District Public Nurse or Other Nurses and Nursing Services 

Social Service League of Cohasset, Inc. 6,000.00 

Inspector of Animals and Slaughtering 

Salary of Inspector 277.00 

Refuse and Garbage Disposal-Town Dump 
Salary and Wages 8,808.77 

Expenses: 

Equipment and Supplies 54.70 

Electricity 78.58 

Bulldozing and Gravel 4,401.51 

Burying Animals 57.00 

Control of Rats 240.00 



136 



Rental-Garbage Containers 487.00 

Repairs to Fence 156.00 5,474.79 



Eradication of Mosquitoes 
Expenses: 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts 

State Reclamation Board 4,700.00 

Mosquito Control Project-Chapter 252 General Laws 
Expenses: 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts 

State Reclamation Board 1,450.00 

Control of Insect Life-Straits Pond 
Expenses: 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts 

State Reclamation Board 1,435.00 

Sewer Department 
Salary and Wages: 

Superintendent 1,000.00 

Clerical 300.00 

Wages 2,750.65 3,050.65 



Expenses: 








Dues and Subscriptions 


27.00 






Office Supplies and Expenses 


97.78 






Advance Training 


105.00 






Insurance 


325.00 






Equipment Maintenance 


393.69 






Supplies - Chemicals 


540.19 






Telephone 


100.00 






Electricity 


327.65 






Supplies- Janitorial 


90.00 


2,006.31 
150.00 




Out of State Travel 






Capital Outlay: 








(2) File Cabinets 


55.20 






Miscellaneous tools & equipment 102.70 






Testing Equipment 


691.12 


849.02 


45,638.38 


Sewer Construction - From Bond Issue 






Contractor 


60,520.36 






Engineering 


10,160.00 






Land Easements 


100.00 






Land Rent 


20.00 


70,800.36 




Sewer Construction - From Federal Grants 




Contractor 


130,179.32 






Engineering 


6,167.50 






Land Appraisals 


150.00 






Land Easements 


900.00 






Electricity 


89.30 


137,486.12 


208,286.48 



Branch Sewer Line to Police «& Fire Headquarters Building 
Contractor 4,018.19 

Engineering 350.00 4,368.19 



k 



Highways General 

137 



Salary and Wages: 






Surveyor 




8,080.00 


Wages 




44,243.69 


Expenses: 






Telephone 


224.41 




Material and Supplies 


15,521.72 




Maintenance of Trucks and Equipment: 




Gas and Oil 


2,742.02 




Registrations 


66.00 




Repairs and Maintenance 


5,576.02 




Street Signs 


1,667.80 




Dues 


15.00 




Street Painting 


1,708.00 




Rental of Equipment 


4,265.00 




Police Details 


150.00 




Repairs Sea Wall — Storm Damage 200.00 




Advertising and Miscellaneous 


16.30 


32,152.27 



Capital Outlay: 

(1) Hy-Dynamic D>Tiahoe Backhoe — 

Loader 14,965.00 

Advertising 21.33 14,986.33 



Chapter 616, Acts of 1967 — South Main Street 

Materials 2,661.83 

Chapter 90 Maintenance — Jerusalem Road 

Contractor 6,000.00 

Chapter 90 Construction — Forest Avenue 

Contractor 12,259.82 

Police — Traffice Control 230.00 12,489.82 



Reconstructing and Resurfacing Sidewalks: 

Materials 1,500.00 

Article 23 — Ash Street 

Materials and Supplies 2,366.17 

Contractor 2,633.83 5,000.00 



Snow and Ice Removal Sanding Streets 




Expenses: 




Wages 5,045.04 




Rental of Equipment 15,992.00 




Tools and Equipment 130.00 




Sand 1,971.00 




Rock Salt 9,232.90 




Maintenance of Trucks and Equipment: 




Repairs 2,766.69 




Gas and oU 314.60 


35,452.23 


Street Lighting and Beacons 


17,564.19 


Municipal Garage 




Expenses: 




Fuel 871.88 




Electricity 198.23 




Repairs 132.00 


1,202.11 



Harbor Maintenance 

138 



181,332.47 



I 



Salaries and Wages: 




Harbor Master 


6,988.00 


Assistant Harbor Master 


100.00 


Wages 


1,585.28 


Expenses: 




Equipment and supplies 


956.31 


Wharf and Float repairs 


535.49 


Maintenance — Building 


245.37 


Electricity 


57.32 


Maintenance of boat & equipenint 367.78 


Stationery & office expenses 


109.83 


Telephone 


91.84 


Dues 


20.00 



8,673.28 



2,383.94 

Wages — Relocating Moorings 315.48 

Capital Outlay: 

(2) Floats 1,000.00 

Article 30 — (1969) — Repairs to Stone Wall Lawrence Wharf 

Contractor 4,800.00 

Advertising 21.33 4,821.33 17,194.03 



4,631.42 



Public Welfare — Federal Grants 






Refunds — State and Federal 




1,765.49 


Medical Assistance 




2,865.93 


Veterans' Services 




Administration: 






Salary 


830.00 




Office Salary 


830.00 


1,660.00 


Expenses: 






Office supplies and expenses 


44.90 




Dues 


30.00 


74.90 


Assistance: 






Cash Grants to individuals 


10,596.79 




Groceries and Provisions 


134.97 




Fuel 


90.70 




Medicine and Medical Care 


1,748.91 




Blue Cross-Blue Shield 


242.40 


12,813.77 


Schools — General Maintenance 






Expenses: 






Administration 






School Committee Expenses 


395.89 




Other 


895.98 




Superintendent 






Salary 


22,307.67 




Staff's Salaries 


13,562.62 




Office Supplies 


1,382.55 




Travel & Dues 


948.92 


39,493.63 


Instruction 






Supervision 







14,548.67 



139 



Salaries 


30,917.49 




Clerical Salaries 


1,482.96 




Principals 






Salaries 


56,688.47 




Clerical Salaries 


24,130.25 




Contracted Services 


3,683.03 




Supplies 


5,579.70 




Travel 


481.53 




Teaching 






Professional Salaries 


948,975.07 




Non-professional Salaries 


4,619.49 




Contracted Services 


2,020.40 




Supplies 


34,838.64 




Travel 


164.67 




Textbooks 






Rebinding 


404.09 




Purchase of Textbooks 


16,424.76 




Library 






Salaries 


22,775.02 




Clerical Assistant 


4,913.72 




Rebinding 


107.40 




Books & Supplies 


7,421.63 




Audio-Visual 






Salaries 


731.00 




Materials & Supplies 


5,910.12 




Dues 


10.00 




Guidance 






Salaries 


26,351.58 




Clerical Salaries 


5,249.88 




Contracted Services 


1,055.69 




Supplies & Materials 


2,069.49 




Travel & Dues 


188.57 




Psychological Services 


870.00 




Educational TV 


880.00 


1,208,944.65 


Health Services 






Salaries 


15,081.80 




Supplies 


613.50 




In-Town Travel 


236.00 


15,931.30 


Attendance 




425.00 


Student Transportation 






Bus Drivers' Salaries 


18,165.27 




Gasoline & Oil 


3,134.82 




Physicals, etc. 


168.00 




Maintenance of Buses 


9,219.90 




Other expenses 


1,658.53 




Contracted Buses 


24,535.25 


56,881.77 


Athletics 






Professional Salaries 


20,818.13 




Non-professional Salaries 


5,259.49 




Contracted Services 


2,610.84 




Supplies & Materials 


12,345.45 




Ice time, insurance, etc. 


2,031.72 


43,065.63 



140 



Student Activities 








Professional Salaries 


1,855.50 






Other Salaries 


94.29 






Services 


65.65 






Supplies 


1,735.01 






Other Expenses 


228.31 


3,978.76 




Plant Operation 






Custodial Salaries 


90,256.23 






Services 


131.25 






Supplies 


6,304.43 






Heat 


10,593.48 






Electricity & Telephone 


19,352.16 


126,637.55 




Plant Maintenance 






Grounds — Salaries 


1,969.44 






Contract Services 


503.05 






Supplies 


149.88 






Upkeep of Buildings 


22,010.41 






Supplies 


3,342.16 






Maintenance of Equipment 


2,760.58 






Supplies 


148.90 


30,884.42 




Acquisition of Fixed Assets 






Alterations of Buildings 


400.00 






New Equipment 


9,587.72 






Replacement 


5,710.18 


15,697.90 
740.00 




Tuitions: Non- Vocational Stud 


ents 


1,542,680.61 


thletic Revolving Fund 






Travel Expenses 




81.50 




Contracted Services 




597.40 




Supplies 




829.69 


1,508.59 


tiapter 506 (Metco) 






Instructional Expenses 




2,597.60 




Transportation 




4,785.00 


7,382.60 



Out of State Travel 

Expenses 
P. L. #88-210 

Equipment 
P. L. #89-10 Title I 

Instructional Salaries 

Telephone 

Expenses 

P. L. #864 

Instructional Expenses 
Contract Buses 
New Equipment 

P. L. #874 

Administrative Expenses 
Instructional Expenses 



5,136.29 

106.68 

70.52 


1,161.08 
240.00 

5,313.49 


1,336.28 

58.50 

10,437.22 


11,832.00 


190.00 
3,856.05 





141 



Health Services 2.23 

Transportation 898.70 

Plant Operation 1,909.75 

Acquisition of Equipment 2,518.95 9,375.68 

Smith-Hughes, George Harden Act 

Equipment 308.60 

Vocational 

Tuition & Travel Expenses 1,171.05 

South Shore Regional School District - Assessment 17,976.00 

School Lunches 

Salaries 36,547.07 

Food Purchases 55,482.72 

Supplies 3,275.19 

Training 20.00 

Repairs 77.18 



Gas 


783.33 


59,638.42 


96,185.49 


Construction - Addition to Junior-Senior High School 






Contractor 




88,228.05 




Architect Services 




7,190.43 




Advertising 




12.80 




Engineering ' 




275.63 




Equipment 




25,699.44 




Site Work 




10,070.60 


131,476.95 


Acquisition of Land - Junior-Senior High School 




13,296.00 


School Facilities Committee - Article 47,1969: 






Appraisals 




5,800.00 




Printing and Miscellaneous 




254.46 


6,054.46 


Libraries - General Maintenance 








Expenses: 








Salaries & Wages - Paul Pratt Memorial Library 


31,026.26 




Paul Pratt Memorial Library • 


• Appropriation to 






Treasurer of library for: 








Expenses 


12,325.00 






Overpayment-see refunds- 








Reciepts 


1,675.00 


14,000.00 
1,000.00 




Nantasket Branch Library 




46,026.26 


Town Commons & Parks: 








Salaries and Wages 




8,652.72 




Expenses: 








Equipment and Supplies 


154.66 






Repairs 


207.09 






Gas and oil for Mowers 


63.50 






Fertilizer 


297.10 






Truck Allowance 


150.00 






Flags 


30.00 


902.35 


9,555.07 


Recreation and Playgrounds: 








Salaries and Wages 




3,069.01 




Expenses: 








Beechwood Bali Field: 








Maintenance 


458.00 







142 



r 



[ 
I 



Contract Mowing 


350.00 


North Cohasset Playground: 

Fence 

Supplies 


100.00 
123.61 


Milliken Bancroft Field: 
Gas and oil for Mowers 
Maintenance 
Electricity 


8.66 

294.79 

15.75 


Harold F. Barnes Field: 
Supplies 

Contract Mowing 
Maintenance of Grounds 


20.45 
350.00 
220.00 


Skating Rinks: 
Electricity 


47.57 


Summer Program: 
Wages 
Instructors 
Supplies 


1,800.00 
319.51 
333.91 



Capital Outlay: 

Wire Cable Fence Milliken Field 396.17 
Backstop - Barnes Field 998.00 

Resurfacing Tennis Courts - 

Milliken 1,965.00 



I 



1,988.83 



2,453.42 



3,359.17 



» 



h 



Memorial Day and Other Legal Holidays and Celebrations: 
Memorial Day: 

Band Services 150.00 



10,870.43 



Wheelwright Park Trust Fund Income: 








Expenses: 








Labor 




292.72 




Mowing 




85.00 




Signs 




28.00 




Saw 




4.99 


410.71 


Wadleigh Park Trust Fund Income: 








Expenses: 








Labor 




277.00 




Rolling - Grass Area 




15.00 




Miscellaneous 




7.35 


299.35 


Cedar Street Cemetery Trust Fimd Income: 






Labor 






84.80 


Charlotte Tincoln Bell Memorial Fund • 


- Cemetery Care 






Expenses: 








Labor 




508.80 




Water Services 




12.03 




Gas and oil for mowers 




3.15 




Repairs to Mowers 




2.50 


526.48 


Black Rock Beach - Clearing Title 






180.00 



143 



Collation 


152.43 


Flags 


276.00 


Wreaths and Flowers 


77.45 


Youth Days: 




Band Services 




Christmas Celebrations: 




Wages 


150.72 


Electrical Supplies 


63.60 



655.88 
200.00 

214.32 1,070.20 



Retirement Fimd to County System 40,534.43 

Non-Contributory Pensions: 
Various Persons 



Municipal Insurance: 
Fire Insurance 
Workmen's Compensation 
Automobile Insurance 
Public Liability 
Theft & Burglary 
Floaters - Various Departments 
Bonds 
Boilers 
Bleachers 

Employees Group Insurance: 
Life Insurance 
Blue Cross, Blue Shield 

Town Reports: 

Printing Town Reports 
Delivering Town Reports 
Advertising 

(Unclassified and Miscellaneous: 

Town Clock: 

Services 
Town Flag: 

Flags 

'Article 45, 1969, 200th Anniversary Celebration - Expenses 
Article 35, 1969, Council on Aging - Expenses 
Town Buildings: 
.• Expenses: 

North Cohasset Post Office and Fire Station Building: 

Water Services 47.88 

Repairs 114.94 162.82 



9,495.20 


50,029.63 


12,497.95 




7,604.90 




6,541.27 




1,912.00 




194.00 




256.33 




500.00 




339.00 




75.00 


29,920.45 


2,322.44 




29,762.12 


32,084.56 


2,400.00 




258.40 




6.60 


2,665.00 


100.00 




108.64 


208.64 


Expenses 


1,197.23 




141.97 



Government Island Real Estate: 
Repairs 900.39 

Water Services 205.72 1,106.11 



Guild HaU Building: 

Repairs 96.51 

Fuel 453.03 549.54 



144 



p 



Bates Building: 

Repairs 293.88 

Capital Outlay: 
North Cohasset Building 

Painting Exterior 675.00 

Remodeling Interior Post 

Office 1,400.00 2,075.00 4,187.35 



Parking Places Maintenance: 

Lining Parking Area-Sandy Beach 

Cleaning and Rubbish Removal - Sandy Beach 102.00 285.00 

Water Department 
Salaries and Wages: 

Salary of Superintendent 



General: 




Pipe and fittings 


2,479.33 


Meters and fittings 


1,526.45 


Insurance 


2,820.05 


Repairs and Maintenance 


448.75 


Service Connections 




Pipe and fittings 


1,914.98 


Miscellaneous Supplies 


487.75 


Repairs and Maintenance 


1,258.83 


Pumping Station 




Fuel 


510.16 


Supplies 


1,434.83 


Building Repairs 


368.45 


Electricity 


7,701.44 


Purification 




Supplies 


6,266.13 


Maintenance 


527.43 





183.00 
102.00 


9,786.62 
49,510.06 



Expenses: 

Administration 

Stationery, Printing & Office 

Expenses 985.21 

Telephones 516.54 

Addressograph Services 42.36 
Maintenance of Billing Machines 114.00 

Electricity 83.02 

Fuel 342.44 

Travel 29.36 2,112.93 



7,274.58 



3,661.56 



10,014.88 



6,793.56 



Maintenance of Trucks and Equipment 
Gas and oil 543.70 

Repairs 824.24 

Tires, etc. 234.83 

Insurance 585.10 

Registrations 27.00 2,214.87 



145 



Capital Outlay: 

Engineering 530.00 

Replace Pump at Station 6 909.22 
1969 Dodge Truck - Trade-in 1962 

International Scout (Net) 1,890.00 
Advertising 27.65 



Cemeteries - Veterans' Graves: 

Woodside Cemetery - Care of Graves 

Labor 200.00 

Cohasset Central Cemetery - Care of Graves 

Services 1,250.00 



Cemeteries - Perpetual Care - Woodside 

Salary - Superintendent 
Cemeteries - Improvements, etc. 
Article 38, 1969 

Contractors 3,655.00 

Article 25, 1959 

Contractors 322.50 



3,356.87 



Other Expenses: 






Blue Cross, Blue Shield 


1,276.08 




Life Insurance 


96.00 




County Retirement 


2,628.00 


4,000.08 


Debt Services: 






Interest 


7,139.00 




Maturing Debt 


36,000.00 


43,139.00 


'emeteries 






Superintendent's Wages 




4,833.60 


Wages: 






Woodside Cemetery 


1,044.00 




Beechwood Cemetery 


637.75 


1,681.75 


Woodside Cemetery 






Expenses: 






Electricity 


16.23 




Supplies 


60.01 




Telephone Allowance 


36.00 




Loam 


80.00 




Repairs - others 


22.10 




Repairs to Mowers 


79.38 




Gas and oil 


76.13 




Fuel (Wood) 


25.00 




Truck Expenses 


31.00 


425.85 



141,865.01 



1,450.00 
1,166.00 

3,977.50 



13,534.70 



Interest: 

Anticipation of Revenue 


29,971.42 




Schools - Bond Issues 


106,165.13 




Police and Fire Headquarters Bldg. 


4,030.00 




Sewerage 


13,440.00 




Anticipation of Highway Reimbursement 


190.33 




Tax Abatements 


44.40 


153,841.28 


Municipal Indebtedness - Except Water: 







146 



Temporary Loans 

Anticipation of Revenue 

Anticipation of Highway Reimbursement 

Maturing Debt 

Schools - From Appropriation 
Schools - From Bond Premium 
Police & Fire Headquarters Building 
Sewerage 

Refunds 
Taxes - Real and Personal 

Motor Excise 
Water Services 
Water Rates 

Sale of Cemetery Lots Fund 
Water Liens 
Estimated Receipts 
Blue Cross, Blue Shield 
Life Insurance 

State and County Assessments: 
State Parks and Reservations 
Metropolitan Parks 
State Assessment System 
Motor Vehicle Excise Tax Bills 
Health Insurance State Elderly Governmental 

Retiree Program 
Metropolitan Area Planning Council 
Mass. Bay Transportation Authority 
County Tax 
County Hospital 

Trusts: 

Woodside Cemetery Perpetual Care Funds 
James W. Nichols School Prize Fund 
Major William Arthur Scholarship Fund 
Conservation Fund 

Agency: 

Pay Roll Deductions: 

Federal Withheld Taxes 

State Withheld Taxes 

Blue Cross, Blue Shield 

Retirement - County 

Group Life Insurance 

Annuity - Teachers 

Retirement - Teachers - State 

Dues - Teachers 
Dog Licenses to Coimty 



1,300,000.00 
4,000.00 

231,149.31 

6,646.69 

10,000.00 

20,000.00 



14,624.44 

4,935.74 

225.00 

442.08 

40.00 

25.00 

10.00 

97.88 

2.76 



13,178.77 

1,924.19 

262.36 

701.55 

803.27 

275.57 

7,323.31 

71,855.39 

4,032.63 



8,100.00 

50.00 

500.00 

325.00 



291,295.15 

48,903.99 

32,762.36 

35,085.76 

2,624.08 

5,485.00 

54,943.45 

4,001.75 

1,667.00 



1,571,796.00 



20,402.90 



100,357.04 



8,975.00 



476,768.54 



Investments 

Certificates of Deposit 

Investment-Perpetual Care Funds 

Article 14, 1969, Appropriation-Stabilization Fund 

TOTAL EXPENDITURES 



150,000.00 
25,221.01 
45,000.00 



220,221.01 
$5,736,856.77 



147 



TRUST FUNDS IN CUSTODY OF TOWN TREASURER 
AS OF JANUARY 1, 1970 

Balance Interest Transfer Balance 

Jan. 1, 1969 1969 to Town Dec. 31, 1969 

PARKS AND PLAYGROUNDS 



Arthur N. Milliken Fund: 100.10 


4.95 




105.05 


Robert Charles Billings Fund: 








Town Common 1,150.00 


56.06 


56.06 


1,150.00 


Billings-Pratt Park Fund: 1,000.00 


48.74 


48.74 


1,000.00 


H. W. Wadleigh Park Fund: 5,000.00 


243.74 


243.74 


5,000.00 


Wheelwright Park Fund: 15,000.00 


731.24 


731.24 


15,000.00 


Edith M. Bates Town Pond and 








Common Fund 1,580.17 


78.42 




1,658.59 


CEMETERIES 






Perpetual Care - Woodside Cemetery 








Cohasset Savings Bank 20,897.03 








Lots added during 1969 1,875.00 




25.221.01* 




Annual care converted to 


1,124.41 


1,692.69 




Perpetual Care 6,225.00 








28,997.03 


1,124.41 


26,913.70 


3,207.74 


* 25,000.00 New England Power Co. 1st Mortgage 






par 100 due Sept. 1, 1999, interest rate 








8%% - accrued interest $221.01 




(25,221.01) 


25,221.01 


Perpetual Care - Beechwood 








Cemetery 4,987.29 


246.95 


3.66 


5,230.58 


Cedar Street Cemetery 1,226.12 


56.26 


200.00 


1,082.38 


Charlotte Lincoln Bell Memorial 








Fund 15,657.76 


766.05 


500.00 


15,923.81 


SCHOOLS 








Ripley Fund 1,207.59 


59.92 




1,267.51 


James W. Nichols School Prize 








Fund 2,874.31 


140.82 


50,00 


2,965.13 


Major William Arthur Scholarship 








Fund 6,854.08 


327.69 


500.00 


6,681.77 


OIUER 








Post War Rehabilitation Fund 661.74 


32.81 




694.55 


War Memorial Fund 1,234.81 


61.28 




1,296.09 


STABILIZATION FUND 54,139.54 








Transfer from Town 








Appropriation (1969) 45,000.00 


4,040.10 


1( 




99,139.54 


[)3,179.64** 


CONSERVATION FUND 16,203.43 


779.84 


325.00 


16,658.27 



TOTAL TRUST FUNDS IN CUSTODY OF TOWN TREASURER 207,322.12 
TOTAL TRUST FUNDS IN CUSTODY OF LIBRARY TRUSTEES, 

COHASSET FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY FUND; 36,934.45 

See Treasurer's Report for Details, see page 84 

244,256.57 



=* Pilgrim Cooperative Bank $23,742.80 
Cohasset Savings Bank 79,436.84 



$103,179.64 

148 



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163 



ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

OF THE 

TOWN OF COHASSET 

MASSACHUSETTS 




FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1969 

School Committee 

Sumner Smith, Jr., Chairman Term Expires 1972 

Lot E. Bates Term Rxpires 1970 

Paul M. Donovan Term Expires 1970 

T. Gerard Keating Term Expires 1971 

John P. Reardon Term Expires 1971 

Ellen Smith Term Expires 1972 

Superintendent of Schools 

Nelson J. Megna 
School Physician 

Dr. Robert T. Sceery 
Secretary to the Superintendent 

Ruth Bacigalupo 

Helen Mitchell, Bookkeeper 

Jean Viola, Secretary - Part Time 

Regular Meetings of the Committee 

At 8:00 p.m. On The Third Monday Of Each Month At The High School 

165 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

On July 31, 1969, Mr. William Ripley Jr. retired after 29 years 
as Superintendent of Cohasset's Schools. Characteristically, Bill was on 
the job virtually the last minute as he attended a School Facilities Com- 
mittee meeting on the night of July 31. 

Coming to Cohasset in 1926, a native of neighboring Hingham and 
immediately after graduation from Brov^n University, Mr. Ripley began 
his career in education as a high school science teacher at the original 
Osgood School. His success in the classroom was accompanied by suc- 
cess as a coach of both football and baseball. In 1941 he became Super- 
intendent and Principal of the Osgood School and later the present High 
School. He continued as superintendent when the principalship was made 
a separate position in 1955. 

Bill Ripley leaves as his heritage a good influence on generations of 
students and an excellent staff both professional and non-professional. In 
addition, he had the unique experience of having many former students 
as members of the School Committee. We are sure all citizens of Cohasset 
join in grateful thanks to Mr. Ripley for his wise and skillful leadership 
of Cohasset schools, and extend best wishes for a long, healthy and happy 
retirement. 

Late in January, shortly after Mr. Ripley announced his intention 
to retire, the committee began its search for a new superintendent. Speci- 
fications for the position were printed and distributed to numerous schools 
of education. Applications were received from 40 applicants from 7 
states. After the committee interviewed 12 of the most promising candi- 
dates and reviewed the 3 finalists, on April 28 the committee unanimously 
appointed Nelson J. Megna, who was Superintendent of the Washington 
South Supervisory District which includes the towns of Berlin, Northfield 
and Roxbury in Vermont. 

After 10 years in Vermont schools as teacher, principal and super- 
intendent, Mr. Megna came to Cohasset on July 15 and worked with 
Mr. Ripley for the balance of the month to provide a smooth transition 
in the administration. 

By diligence and concentrated effort, Mr. Megna has quickly learned 
about our personnel and the strengths and weaknesses of our school 
system. In these days of rapid change and turbulence in education Mr. 
Megna has demonstrated wisdom far beyond his years in handling diffi- 
cult problems. The committee is grateful to Mr. Megna for accepting the 
position of Superintendent. 

Negotiations with the Cohasset Teachers Association were not com- 
pleted until March 15 when Mr. Brendan Dalton of the State Mediation 
Service was present for an all-day Saturday session. As this was after 
the Annual Town Meeting and as the increase in the minimum salary 
from $6200 to $6800 was greater than anticipated in the budget, numerous 
revisions and deletions were required. It is a pleasure to note that with 

166 



f 



implementation of tight budgetary controls, the committee was able to 
operate properly and stay within its budget. 

Although the 2 elementary schools are at capacity enrollment, pro- 
jections are not clear as to rapid increases. Nevertheless, the committee 
urged for use as sites for future schools purchase of a 71 acre tract of 
land off Sohier Street by the School Facilities Committee. In addition, 
the committee ordered the administration to study and report by October 
1, 1970, the revived concept of year roimd schools. 

With the rapid increase in the rate of inflation it is indeed difficult 
to keep pace and still bring needed improvements to our schools. We 
appreciate the townspeople's desire for quality education and will con- 
tinue to do our best to justify your support. 

Respectfully submitted, 

SUMNER SMITH, JR., CHAIRMAN 

LOT E. BATES 

PAUL M. DONOVAN 

T. GERARD KEATING 

JOHN P. REARDON, JR. 

ELLEN P. SMITH (MRS. ROBERT M.) 

ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 
SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 

To the School Committee and Residents of Cohasset: 

It is a pleasure to submit my first annual report as your Superin- 
tendent of Schools. For purposes of clarity, the report is divided into two 
sections. Section I contains enrollment mfomiation and other statistical 
data of a general nature; Section II summarizes significant developments 
in the educational program which have taken place during the past year 
and concludes with recommendations for future improvement of the 
school system. 

SECTION I — STATISTICAL DATA 

A comparison of enrollments on October 1 for the school years 
1965-1966 through 1969-1970 (current) is provided by the following 
table: 

Table 1 — Comparative Enrollments, Five- Year Survey 

Grade Year 



Level 


1965 


1966 


1967 


1968 


1969 


K 


127 


110 


120 


123 


135 


1 


121 


151 


129 


149 


142 


2 


152 


141 


160 


121 


135 


3 


160 


154 


149 


167 


**127 


4 


143 


161 


154 


157 


164 


5 


140 


129 


163 


156 


164 


6 


120 


146 


142 


176 


162 



167 



7 


120 




117 


141 


149 


176 


8 


131 




115 


118 


141 


146 


9 


106 




124 


108 


121 


146 


10 


112 




102 


127 


104 


128 


11 


87 




107 


101 


128 


108 


12 


98 




86 


100 


99 


116 


Spec. CI 


*** 




*** 


*** 


*** 


5 


TOTALS 


1617 




1643 


1712 


1791 


1854 


** Grade 3 - 


— Joseph 


Osgood School 






69 


Grade 3 - 


-Deer Hill School 






58 



4; Hs 5{J 



Reported at performance grade level 



Table 2 provides a comparison of the enrollments in each of the 
three schools over a five year period: 

Table 2 — Enrollment Data Grouped by Schools — Five-Year Survey 

Year Building 



School 


1965 


1966 


1967 


1968 


1969 


Capacity 


J.O. 


435 


458 


457 


497 


481 


425 


D.H. 


528 


534 


560 


557 


553 


500 


High 


654 


651 


695 


742 


820 


1000 


TOTALS 


1617 


1643 


1712 


1791 


1854 





October 1 enrollment figures provide a means for comparing the 
school system's enrollment at a comparable time during any school year, 
but they do not provide an accurate description of the overall enrollment 
pattern. A more precise representation can be obtained by using a statistic 
called the Average Daily Membership (ADM). This is obtained for any 
given year by adding the aggregate number of days of attendance of all 
students to the aggregate number of days of absence of all students and 
dividing that sum by the total number of days that school was in session. 
The ADM for the two preceding school years are provided in Table 3. 
These figures include both resident and non-resident (METCO) students. 

Table 3 — Average Daily Membership: Two-year Comparison 

1967-1968 1968-1969 Net Change 



Category 

Elementary 

Secondary 

TOTALS 



1,016.4 
700.7 

1,717.1 



1,055.0 
747.0 

1,802.0 



+38.6 
+46.3 

+84.9 



In addition to those enrolled in the public schools, there are 201 
school age children residing in Cohasset who attend school outside of the 
community. Table 4 summarizes the distribution of these students by the 
type of school which they attend. 



168 



Table 4 



Resident Students Attending Other Schools: 1969-1970 



Type of School 
Parochial 

Private Day or Boarding 
So. Shore Regional Vo-Tech 
Other 

TOTALS 



Number Enrolled 

30 

158 

8 

5 

201 



Table 5 summarizes student progress for the preceding school year. 



Table 5 — Student Progress: 1968-1969 

Joseph Osgood Deer Hill 



Category 

Completions 

Promotions 491 549 

Non-Promotions 11 8 

Transfers 19 17 

Drop-Outs 2 

Deaths 

TOTALS 523 574 

Activities of the 99 students who graduated 

School in June, 1969 are summarized in Table 6. 



High 



School 
99 
639 
5 

19 

7 



769 

from Cohasset High 



Table 6 — Survey of CHS Graduates: Class 

Category Number 

Continuing Education 82 

Four -Year College (50) 

Junior College (16) 

Nursing Education (2) 

Other Schools (14) 

Armed Services 5 

Employed 10 

Business (Trade) (3) 

Clerical (3) 

Manufacturing (4) 

Homemaking 2 

TOTALS 99 



of 1969 

Percent 
82.8 

(50.0) 

(16.2) 
(2.0) 

(14.1) 
5.1 
10.1 
(3.0) 
(3.0) 
(4.1) 
2.0 

100.0 



Services provided to students through the school health program 
during the preceding school year are summarized in Table 7. 

Table 7 — Summan of School Health Program Activities: 1968-1969 



Type of Service 


Osgood 


Deer Hill 


High 


Total 




School 


School 


School 




Physical Exams 


100 


132 


429 


661 


Vision Testing 


501 


559 


749 


1809 


Hearing Testing 


501 


559 


749 


1809 


Immunization 


379 


472 


578 


1429 



Referrals for remedial care of vision defects — 64; number of students 
receiving corrective action — 58. Referrals for remedial care of hearing 
defects — 36; number of students receiving corrective action — 36. Re- 



169 



ferrals resulting from physical examinations by tiie school physician — 28; 
number of such referrals completed — 28. 

During tiie preceding school year, 140 students received corrective 
therapy from the speech therapy program. Activities of the speech therapist 
are tabulated below. 

Table 8 -— Sammary of Speech Therapy Services: 1968-1969 



Type of 


Osgood Deer Hill 


High 




Speech Defect 


School School 


School 


Total 


Stuttering 


2 7 





9 


Articulation 


65 48 





113 


Hearing Handicap 


2 1 


2 


5 


Other 


8 4 


1 


13 


TOTALS 


77 60 


3 


140 


Referrals for orthodontic evaluation — 13. 






Table 9 summarizes school lunch and special 


milk program 


activities 


for the preceding year 


'. 







Tahle 9 — School Lunch Program Participation: 1968-1969 

Item Quantity Served 

Type A Lunches 1 82,376 

Milk (Half Pints) 84,678 

STAFF DIRECTORY 

1969-1970 
Itinerant Staff 

(Persons Providing Services to More Than One Building) 
Name & Position Year Elected 

Gordon E. Bowman, Music 1966 

Mrs. Eleanor Croan, Speech Therapist 1966 

Paul Emanuello, Chief Custodian 1951 

-^Randolph Feola, Attendance Officer 1967 

Mrs. Ethel Gormley, Head School Nurse 1955 

*Mrs. Margaret Manners, Guidance Counselor, Elementary Schools 1969 

Miss Nancy Peterson, Music 1969 

Harry Rodgers, Music Supervisor 1962 

*Dr. Robert Sceery, School Physician 

*Mrs. Patricia Wunschel, School Lunch Program Supervisor 1953 

Joseph Osgood School 
Instructional Staff 

Catherine Mulcahy, Principal 1936 

Carol Andersen, Grade 2 1969 

Florence Ayers, Grade 3 1938 

Ruth Basiliere, Grade 1 1966 

* Vivian C. Chumbley, Librarian 1968 

Ruth I. Clark, Transitional Class 1967 

Edith Degnan, Kindergarten 1963 

Delia DiBenedetto, Grade 2 1957 

Mary K. Donovan, Helping Teacher 1955 

170 



Dorothy HaU, Grade 1 1957 

^Dorothy Hibbard, Helping Teacher 1965 

Carol Hubbard, Kindergarten 1969 

Shirley Manna, Grade 1 1963 

Janet Miele, Kindergarten 1961 

Dorothy Montuori, Grade 3 1969 

Violet O'Ouin, Grade 1 1951 

Harriet L. Piepenbrink, Grade 3 1963 

Marilyn Power, Reading 1968 

Rosamond T. Reardon, Reading Supervisor 1952 

Ellen Rief, Transitional Qass 1969 

Pamela Robie, Grade 2 1969 

Mary Rohrbach, Grade 2 1969 

Rosamond Terry, Grade 1 1946 

"^Nancy White, Physical Education 1965 

*Lisabeth Wyman, Art 1967 
Other Staff 

Donald Ainslie, Custodian & Bus Driver 1966 

Henry Brennock, Head Custodian 1958 

Gertrude Chase, Teachers' Aide 1968 

Anne Curley, Teachers' Aide 1969 

Mary Davis, Secretary 1968 

Irene Frugoli, Lunchroom Staff 1955 

William McLellan, Custodian 1959 

* Shirley Piepenbrink, Lunchroom Staff 1969 

* Shirley Prendergast, Secretary 1969 
^Elizabeth Sinopoli, Lunchroom Staff 1968 

Deer HiU School 
Instructional Staff 

John F. Cramer, Principal 1954 

Jane Archibald, Grade 5 1968 

Joseph Becker, Grade 6, Science and Sci. Supv. 1968 

Patricia Chase, Grade 4 1965 

Alice Daunt, Grade 4 1953 

Frank Deakin, Grade 6, Social Studies 1969 

Nancy G. Harney, Grade 3 1969 

Denise Henderson, French & Secretarial 1962 

Genevieve Kent, Special Education 1969 

Dennis Kuntz. Physical Education 1964 

*Harry Levi, Audubon Society Consultant 1969 

Deborah Levine, Grade 4 1969 

Margaret Maeder, Grade 6, Self-contained 1968 

Doris McNulty, Librarian 1969 

Mary Mullen, Grade 6, Reading 1958 

Rosemary Murphy, Grade 3 1953 

Joan Natkie, Transitional Class 1969 

Katherine Whitley, Grade 5 1967 

♦Jean O'Malley, Art 1967 

Bette Rega, Reading 1966 

171 



Gertrude Russell, Reading Supervisor 1961 

Susan Searles, Grade 6, English 1969 

Leslie Shaw, Grade 4 1969 

R. Lawrence Shultz, Grade 5 1967 

Lynn Tilden, Grade 5 1968 

Doris Tower, Grade 4 1956 

Eunice Truesdell, Grade 6, Mathematics 1955 

Janet Whalen, Transitional Qass 1969 

Ruth Whiton, Grade 4 1956 

Other Staff 

*Helen Arnold, Teachers' Aide 1968 

Barbara Conte, Secretary 1954 

Mrs. A. Donovan 1963 

Mary Glines, Lunchroom Staff 1955 

Donald Heman, Custodian 1963 

Stella MacDonald, Lunchroom Staff 1966 

*Helen O'Neil, Teachers' Aide 1968 

Nancy Sladen, Lunchroom Staff 1967 

Louis Sorrentino, Head Custodian & Transportation Officer 1959 

James Stover, Custodian 1969 

Cohasset High School 
Instructional StaflE 

Frank J. Giuliano, Jr., Principal 1964 

A. Ward Grant, Jr., Assistant Principal 1960 

Frank Almeida, Science 1969 

Brian Aschinger, Music 1969 

Mary Babaian, Physical Education 1965 

John Baltrushunas, Art 1969 

Dorothy Bates, Mathematics 1962 

Elizabeth Beatson, Mathematics 1969 

Ellen Bialo, Mathematics 1969 

Henry Boltz, Social Studies 1964 

James Campbell, Science 1967 

Peter Carroll, Special Education 1968 

Clark Chatterton, Mathematics & Physical Education 1968 

Melvin Cohen, Social Studies 1962 

Curtis CoUms, Jr., English 1965 

Patricia Coultrip, English v 1964 

Charles Davis, Mathematics 1961 

Gino DiGirolamo, Department Chairman, Mathematics 1959 

Everett Dorr, Director of Athletics & Physical Education 1949 

Kearin Dunn, Mathematics 1959 

Madeline Dunn, English 1967 

Ronald Emmons, English 1967 

Samuel Erbe, Science 1963 

Joseph Federico, Spanish 1968 

James Franey, Science 1961 

*Marjorie Giffen, Learning Disabilities 1969 

Steven Gilmartin, Science 1967 

' 172 



Hope Glover, Home Economics 1957 

Jean Gowdey, French 1969 

Lanier Grassie, French 1969 

Carolyn Gray, French (on Sabbatical Leave) 1961 

Paul Hogan, Mathematics 1967 

Marjorie Holman, Librarian 1966 

Walter Hughes, AV Coordinator & Industrial Arts 1960 

Christine Keenan, English 1969 

Donald Kelly, Social Studies 1962 

*Kathleen Kelm, Art 1969 

Bruce Kraemer, Science & Industrial Arts 1969 

*Doris Lahage, Business Education 1967 

Edwin Leach, Remedial & Developmental Reading 1961 

Laura Leonard, English 1937 

John J. Leary, Jr., Guidance Counselor 1959 

Thomas Lucas, Department Chairman, Art 1954 

Edward MacDermott, Social Studies 1963 

F. Allen MacDonald, English 1960 

William S. McCallum, Jr., Director of Guidance 1956 

Paul Narkiewicz, Department Chairman, Foreign Languages 1968 

Richard Nash, Science 1962 

Mildred Nelson, Business Education 1938 

Thomas O'Neil, Latin 1966 

Patrick Plante, Department Chairman, Industrial Arts 1959 

*Helen Pratt, Physical Education 1967 

Paul Prescott, Supervisor of Special Education Program 1959 

John Raccuia, Social Studies 1953 

Donald Reade, English 1964 

Marie Scheiff, English 1969 

John M. Shaw, Department Chairman, Social Studies 1961 

Edward Sheehan, Social Studies 1959 

Dorothy Sullivan, Science 1967 

Marion Sullivan, Department Chairman, English 1931 

Robert Thompson, Department Chairman, Science 1955 

Dennis Walsh, Mathematics 1969 

Carol Weber, French, Social Studies 1969 

Frank Wunschel, English 1955 

Patricia Wunschel, Home Economics 1953 

Priscilla Winquist, French 1968 

Other Staff 

Cora Ainslie, Lunchroom Staff 1968 

Isabel Ainslie, Lunchroom Manager 1957 

Nancy Anderson, Secretary 1965 

Robert Barrow, Head Custodian 1953 

Mary Brennock, Secretary 1969 

Dorothea Casey, Secretary 1962 

Paul Cogill, Custodian 1969 

Betty Enders, Secretary 1959 

Margaret Kelley, Lunchroom Staff 1968 

Josephine Laugelli, Lunchroom Staff 1967 

173 



Jeanette McNeil, Lunchroom Staff 1968 

Anita Ross, Lunchroom Staff 1969 

Mildred Salyards, Lunchroom Staff 1968 

Edward Sandberg, Custodian 1968 

Louise F. Sands, Secretary 1964 

Kenneth Sargent, Custodian 1968 

Kevin Soule, Custodian & Bus Driver 1967 

Florence Stoddard, Lunchroom Staff 1968 

Charles Stover, Custodian & Bus Driver 1963 

Jean Thompson, School Nurse 1963 

Virginia Waaser, Lunchroom Staff 1960 

Mildred Woomer, Library Clerk 1965 

Bus Drivers 

(Not Listed Above) 

Janet Figueirado 1968 

Nancy Geddes 1968 

Manuel Marks 1950 

Charles Pape 1966 

Maria R. Pape 1960 

* Part Time 



174 



GRADUATING CLASS 



Gary Edward Ainslie 
Richard William Andrews 
Eric Robert Aroner 
Debra Ann Bartlett 
Katherine Benedict 
Linda Jean Blair 
Donna Marie Block 
Daniel Joseph Brennock 
Stephanie Bmndage 
Mary Ann Calorio 
Sharon Craig Campbell 
Timothy L. Carlson 
Kathleen Mary Cashin 
Mark Andrew Cifrino 
Mary Ellen Cifrino 
David Clarke 
Keith Coddington 
Lynda Mae Cogjll 
Kenneth Robert Coleman, Jr. 
Marilyn Hayes Congdon 
Robert Francis Cotter 
Nancy Dale Damon 
Sally Ann Day 
Joanne Judith Dini 
Denise Marie Dolan 
Martha Ellen Duggan 
Deborah Joy Dmican 
Robert Myron Dutton, Jr. 
Dale Janice Edminster 
Hans Lennart Ekman 
Judith Ellen Emanuello 
Michael Francis Emanuello 
Kevin Wade Farrett 
Joanne Loma Gile 
Ronald Harold Goodwin 
Eugene Graham 
Michael John Greene 
Ann Howland Grinnell 
Harry Joseph Hanlon HI 
Michael Sullivan Healey 
Pamela Mary Hobbs 
Susan Carole Howorth 
Margaret Anne Hunt 
Deborah Gay Johnson 
Kristen Melinda Jones 
Thomas Walter Jones 
Bonnie Lee Keegan 
Stephen Paul Kent, Jr. 
Frederick Richard Koed 
Gregory Kent Kramer 



Charlene Kurtz 
David Talbott Lehr 
Susan Mary Libby 
Samuel Francis Lincoln 
John Lawence Longo 
Charles William Mahoney, Jr. 
Ann Elizabeth Maree 
Christine Ann Marks 
Kandance Gaylord Martin 
Mary Ellen Martin 
Mary Jo McCormick 
William Anthony McDonald 
Joseph Paul McGrath 
Mary Elizabeth McLellan 
Paul Andrew Middelmann 
David Mitchell 
Janice Marie Nardo 
Paul Francis Neagle 
William Robert Nickerson 
J. Joseph O'Donnell 
Gail Petersen 
Robert Carl Rechner 
Lesley Virginia Ripley 
William Churchill Robinson 
Donald Robert Rogers 
Jobjn Edward Sadler 
Janet Shannon 
Dana Kevin Simeone 
Karen Ann Smith 
Jane Mabel Souther 
Susan Anne Stoughton 
Dianne Elizabeth Talarico 
Kenneth Ellis Thayer, Jr. 
Cheryl Ann Tibbetts 
William Terrence Tilden 
Mark Joseph Timpany 
Fred Steven Troy HI 
Cathy Jeanne Turner 
Patricia Tusing 
Edward Howard Wall 
James Watson 
Leah Linda Whipple 
Holly Gailegos White 
Michelle Ruth White 
Michael James Willard 
Dean .Anthony Williams 
Diane Elizabeth Williams 
William Blake Woomer 
Nancy Lee Yocum 



175 



Section II — Summary of Activities and Recommendations 

This has been a busy year for the Cohasset Public Schools. A school 
system, like any other social institution, can remain a relevant and vital 
force only if it periodically reassesses its programs and goals. Towards 
that end, several studies are either currently underway or about to be 
initiated. These include the appointment of a committee to develop a 
philosophy for the school system, a review of the curriculum in the areas 
of reading and mathematics, the development of a set of criteria that can 
be applied uniformly throu,ghout the school system to evaluate the effec- 
tiveness of classroomi activities, and a study of the feasibility of extending 
the school calendar to a twelve month year as an alternative to the con- 
struction of additional facilities to house our growing school population. 
In each instance, emphasis is being placed on the total (grades K-12) pro- 
gram in an attempt to assure a well articulated school system. 

In addition to the initiation of studies which will provide direction 
for the future, several changes in the curriculum have been implemented 
during the current school year. Among the more noteworthy: 

— The development of nongraded transitional classrooms taught by a 
team of two teachers each at both the Joseph Osgood and Deer Hill 
schools. The intent of this pilot program is to provide instruction of a 
highly individualized nature to the participants; 

— The creation of an activity period at the Deer Hill School which pro- 
vides time for independent library work and which significantly re- 
duces the number of conflicts between the instrumental music pro- 
gram and regular classroom instruction; 

— The development of social studies "minicourses" for seniors at the 
high school level. Each course is a complete unit of study, and in 
most instances covers approximately nine weeks of work. Students 
are free to select the courses which are of interest to them. 

— Refinement of tiie high school's modular scheduling to permit even 
greater flexibility in the assignment of time to courses and programs. 

The budget proposed by the School Committee for 1970 makes pro- 
vision for several important improvements: 

— Rental of facilities at the First Parish and St. Stephen's churches to 
house the kindergarten program. The relocation of kindergarten 
classes will make space available at the Osgood School and this will 
provide a measure of temporary relief for the overcrowded conditions 
which presently exist at the elementary level; 

— Creation of two new guidance positions, one of which wiU be at the 
elementary level; 

176 



— Increased emphasis on the audio-visual program; 

— Employment of a Curriculum Coordinator and a Director of Special 
Services to improve coordination. 

In concluding this brief report, I would like to express my apprecia- 
tion to all who have been involved in the task of making Cohasset's schools 
better. In particular, I would like to recognize the contributions of the 
PTA who helped with the organization of the volunteer teacher aide pro- 
gram and provided the financial assistance necessary to publish The Com- 
pass; the parents and others who have volunteered their time and talent 
as teacher aides; and the School Committee, School Facilities Committee 
and the staff, whose enthusiasm and dedication have been a very real 
source of inspiration. 

Respectfully submitted, 
NELSON J. MEGNA 
Superintendent of Schools 



177 



INDEX 

Assessors, Board of 108 

Bicentennial Committee 124 

Building Code Committee 96 

Cohasset Free Public Library, Treasurer 84 

Collector of Taxes 103 

Conservation Commission 89 

Committee to Study Administrative Functions 90 

Committee to Study Town Buildings 85 

Council on Aging 94 

Fire Department 120 

Government Island Committee 95 

Harbor Master 94 

Health Department 99 

Highway Department 102 

Housing Authority 88 

Jury List 14 

Moth Superintendent 98 

Personnel Committee 87 

Paul Pratt Memorial Library Ill 

Planning Board 116 

Police Department 106 

Recreation Commission 89 

Registrars, Board of 93 

School Department 165 

School Committee 166 

Superintendent's Report 167 

School Facilities Committee 118 

South Shore Regional School District 118 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 87 

Selectmen, Board of 93 



178 



Sewer Commissioners 92 

Social Service League 98 

South Shore Mosquito Control Project 82 

Town Accountant 125 

Receipts 125 

Expenditures 130 

Trust Funds 148 

Statement of Town Debt 149 

Summary of appropriations and Other Accounts 152 

Balance Sheet, General Accounts 161 

Town Qerk 

Officers and Committees 5 

Annual Town Meeting March 1 16 

Town Election, March 8 33 

Special Town Meeting, December 2 35 

Vital Statistics 65 

Town Treasurer 102 

Tree Warden 117 

Water Commissioners 91 

Wke Department 117 



179 



DENISON PRESS. INC. 
East Weymouth. Mass.